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'splain this to me?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Guns and more, Aug 16, 2008.

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  1. Guns and more

    Guns and more member

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    Snap caps. I understand the concept. (I don't understand why 50 rounds of ammo costs $15 and 5 snap caps cost $15, but I digress). Do you load them in a magazine and release the slide to chamber one? I would think so. So then the gun is cocked and you dry fire it. But the slide doesn't reset. So in a D/A gun, like my PM-9 Kahr, I jack the slide and the snap cap flies out. Pick it up and start over?
    I see on a S/A, you can thumb the trigger to reset it, but that's not what you really want to practice.
    Am I missing something?
     
  2. MT GUNNY

    MT GUNNY Member

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    DRY FIRE exercise, they help learn trigger control. While protecting firing pin. You can also load them with live mag, for mis fire procedures.
     
  3. Marcus84

    Marcus84 Member

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    Why is it bad to dry fire without one?
     
  4. ColinthePilot

    ColinthePilot Member

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    I don't even know anymore
    I'm flinching. didn't need snap caps to tell me that. just one bad magazine that doesn't always hit the slide catch. Now I gotta figure out how to cure that.
     
  5. MT GUNNY

    MT GUNNY Member

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    I dont flinch either, However, safely point the pistol at a wall with snap caps and watch the sights move when you pull the trigger. Practice holding and firing untill the sights dont move. (tigger control)
    Some firearms can be damaged by dry firing.
     
  6. kingpin008

    kingpin008 Member

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    Because in some guns (particularly rimfires) firing the gun without a cartridge in place to absorb the blow from the firing pin can damage the chamber wall, break the firing pin, or both. A snap cam prevents that damage by acting as a surrogate for a live round.
     
  7. GarySTL

    GarySTL Member

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    With the Kahr you don't need to rack the slide fully to reset the trigger. About 1/4" will do it and the snap cap doesn't eject.:D
     
  8. acdodd

    acdodd Member

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    I would guess they sell millions of rounds of live ammo for every snap cap.
    Therefore the price per round of snap cap will be higher.
    Just my guess. Maybe they charge more just because they can. :D
    AC
     
  9. 230RN
    • Contributing Member

    230RN Marines raising the left-leaning Pisa tower.

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    Same with the Kel-Tek PF-9. Also, with the SKS, you don't have to retract the bolt all the way over the mag follower to cock it for dry-firing. I am sure there are a lot of arms for which this is true.

    I use dummies or snap caps when I first try out an autoloader. Fill the mag with live rounds, three short of full, then a dummy, then two live rounds.

    I started doing this when I bought an SKS with that rifle's known slam-fire tendencies, and since then have found two other guns I bought which give double-taps. One a brand new RIA .45, the other a used .22 pistol.

    The full mag is to emulate the full magazine spring tension.

    If the first two rounds go off with one trigger pull, then the dummy stops the phemonemon before an uncontrolled full mag goes downrange or upsky. And the dummy round wil be left in the chamber.

    I try that a couple of times, then I just put two rounds in the mag to test it with low mag spring tension. (This is the most likely situation to produce slam fires, since the bolt or slide meets less resistance on closing.)

    These are not positive tests for NON-slam firing, but if you do get slam fires it indicates that fixing is necessary. Beats getting a real surprise the first time you fire an autoloader with a mag completely full of live rounds.

    I also use this procedure after doing any bubba-ing on the guts of an autoloader.

    Sometimes I use reloaded (rebulleted only) empty cartridges for the dummies, and I magic-marker them green where the bullet meets the neck and in the extractor groove, where the color won't wear off, and sometimes I use regular commercial snap caps. Depends on whether I've got dies or not or money or not.

    I've made snap caps by filling the dummy primer pockets with RTV and striking it off flush with any flat implement. Seems to work fine, but clean the primer pockets thoroughly first. Any adhesive's effectiveness depends on the tensile strength of what you're putting it on, and dirt doesn't have any tensile strength.

    Yeah, I know, "check the gun before you fire it," but this is only sometimes possible, and a mere takedown and visual inspection may not reveal certain faults which can lead to slamfires.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2008
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