Quantcast

Today's New Pocket Knives

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by heeler, Oct 24, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. heeler

    heeler Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    2,619
    Last month my brother had one of his Victronix pocket knifes blade come back against him and sliced his index finger very badly and after that it made me sort of start looking at different knives that have locking blades.
    Well I have to admit I have not bought a pocket knife since the late 1970's when I purchased a Buck Stockman and since it was bigger than I liked in closed length I bought a Buck Cadet a few months later.
    None of these knives have locking blades.
    But no big deal because I hardly ever carry a pocket knife anymore but that's about to change.
    So lately I became somewhat bewildered watching some pistol reviews on YouTube where some guy was using a pocket knife as a pointer or as a sizing graphic and they usually were very fast one handed opening knives and I always wondered how they did that.
    Remember I have not bought a pocket knife since the 70's and now I have been reading up on a LOT of knives this weekend and have discovered that most are one handed flick openers or outright switch blades whether they call them that or not.
    Not sure how they got those things out in the legal market but they seem pretty neat as long as the thing does not go off in your pocket after bumping into something.:uhoh:
    Anyway after watching a NutNFancy video about the Buck Vantage Select I ordered one online for myself and one for my brother for $23.95 each.
    This is the smaller model 340.
    I will probably make another purchase of a higher quality knife with better blade steel later on but wanted some feed back on some brands such as Spyderco,Benchmade,Buck,Kershaw,etc. from those of you that own them.
    I prefer a non serrated blade and a closed length of no more than four inches in length.
    The one deal killer is anything made in Red China.
    No compromise with me there.
    After looking at several websites I find it irritating that a lot of makers do not tell you where their product is made.
    At least Buck does.:D
    Pocket knives have come one hell of a long ways in the last few years with their opening and locking mechanisms,steel quality,pocket clips,and of course price.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2011
  2. sigarms228

    sigarms228 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,082
    Location:
    Illinois
    Those are all great brands.

    I believe that Benchmande knives are all USA made these days though at one time they offered "red class" that was mode in China or such. If you look at Kershaw's catalog on their website it will show which models are USA made.

    From what you describe as wanted a couple that come to mind to check out are the Kershaw Skyline and the Benchmade Mini Griptilian. There are many You Tube reviews of those two knives also.

    http://www.kershawknives.com/
     
  3. heeler

    heeler Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    2,619
    Thanks...That's two more to look at.
    Just curious about all these new types of steel though.
    Buck seems to be using the S-30V in their top of the line knives but I can tell you I own a 1973 made and a 1982 made Buck 110 Hunter that uses the 420 HC blades and they have served me well every year during deer season.
    They have gutted and skinned so many animals and the blades are still in great shape.
    So I am sure these newer steels are probably much better and possibly even stronger but there are so many it's dizzying trying to learn about them.
     
  4. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    Messages:
    10,160
    Location:
    Alabama
    Lock blades will spoil you :neener:

    To me, a knife collecting fossil, today's knives are better than they have ever been.

    Lightweight polymer handle materials greatly reduce the overall weight of the knife which allows designers to add steel to the blade. Which is where the weight should be. You may remember the Buck 110, a revolution in its era, but those heavy brass bolsters added nothing but weight. Another exceptional improvement has been in the quality of the steels. Even the 420 steels are decent, the 440’s, ATS 34, D2, etc, every steel is cleaner, better, the heat treatment better on production knives than they have ever been.

    Be aware, some of the knife steels out there require a diamond hone to restore the edge. The good old India stone of the past is not aggressive enough.

    As for made in America. If it is cheap, it is made in China. American knives are not $14.00. If you want an American knife, Bear knives are a good value, but you are going to have to spend $35.00 or more. Case and Queen knives, which are absolutely outstanding in materials and workmanship, well $75.00 is a good deal.
     
  5. heeler

    heeler Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    2,619
    Thanks for the input SlamFire.
    One thing though about the Buck 110.
    I personally want a heavy knife for gutting a deer as it seems to put less pressure on my hands.
    Best example I can give you is I was helping a newby deer hunter two years ago who shot his first buck and was showing him how to go around the breast bone and instead to pull up through the rib cartlllage.
    He was using his father Schrade Sharp Finger knife and was having all sorts of problems.
    So I took it from him to show him how easy it was and quickly realized how light the knife was and was having trouble myself with it.
    I pulled the 7.5 ounce 110 Hunter and went through that deer like a proverbial hot knife through butter.
    For that application a heavier knife is a good thing.
    Not so much for an EDC though.
     
  6. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    53,295
    Location:
    0 hrs east of TN
    Yep, switchblades are available across the internet and they're no longer just cheap smuggled junk (although plenty of that is out there). OTOH, of you're thinking that the assisted openers that you may not have seen before are switchblades you're mistaken. For a knife to be a switchblade you have to activate it with a mechanism on the handle and it has to be started from closed position with the spring mechanism. Assisted opening knives have to be push started by partially opening the blade before a spring pulls the blade to the locked position. It may seem like a very fine distinction, but it is the critical difference in whether you have a switchblade or assisted opener.

    As to current production knives that fit your need, you'll find several using good old 420HC and plenty of others using 440C and more exotic steels. Designs have become far more ergonomic and locks have improved greatly.
     
  7. heeler

    heeler Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    2,619
    Thanks for the info hso.
    Still though they sure appeared to be a switch blade too me.
    Lot's to read up on and learn about for sure.
     
  8. Magoo

    Magoo Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2009
    Messages:
    712
    Location:
    TN
    Some of the assisted openers are fast and slick enough to make you grin like you've got a switchblade. You still have to close 'em like a traditional locker, though. As hso says, the legal distinction is important but the available assisted openers available will prohibit me from ever entering the pricy world of true switchblades (not that I need one or would anyway).
     
  9. Sheepdog1968

    Sheepdog1968 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2009
    Messages:
    3,518
    Location:
    CA
    Sorry to hear what happened to your brother. I used to carry a very similar Swiss Army knife. Not that long ago I upgraded to the "newer" slightly bigger Swiss Army knives that have locking blades.
     
  10. splithoof

    splithoof Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2010
    Messages:
    1,053
    Benchmade Griptillian. It is offered in two sizes, a variety of handle colors, has a stout blade, and some versions have either a thumb stud or thumb oval opening in the upper portion of the very thick blade. It features the super-strong Axis Lock, which is very easy to open, and just as easy to close. Made in United States of America. I have several , and will never own a better pocket knife.
     
  11. jef2015

    jef2015 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2011
    Messages:
    113
    Location:
    SW La
  12. alaskanativeson

    alaskanativeson Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2008
    Messages:
    798
    Location:
    Back in the Last Frontier
    I cannot recommend a Benchmade Griptilian highly enough. The Gold line from Benchmade is really nice, but just the standard Benchmade Griptilian is still a really great knife. My Chris Reeve small Sebenza is sitting in a drawer while my Cabela's D2 mini-Griptilian is riding in my pocket.
     
  13. Piraticalbob

    Piraticalbob Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2008
    Messages:
    480
    Location:
    Matthews, NC
    Since you seem to be a traditionalist and fan of Buck knives, you might take a look at the Buck Knight. It's a lockback similar in design to the 110, but smaller in size and lighter in weight, without utilizing plastics in the construction. The frame is stainless steel, the blade shape is a drop point instead of the 110's swept point, 1.78" in length, of 420HC steel. And Buck has one of the best warranties in the business. The weight is only 1.5 oz, as opposed to the 7.2 oz. of the 110.
     
  14. TimboKhan

    TimboKhan Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2005
    Messages:
    8,178
    Location:
    Greeley, CO
    I would disagree with you that most knives are assisted or "flick open", but I would agree with you that many, many current knives are designed to be opened one-handed.

    I like Spyderco quality, but they do make some of their knives in Seki City, Japan. Not a problem for me, as they are high quality, well made knives. That particular area that they are made in is a traditional area for blade-making, much like Solingen, Germany. In fact, they have been making cutlery there in one form or another since the 13th century! Spyderco also has a budget line made in China. You don't like Chinese products, don't buy them, but they are very good, well made knives.

    I don't think you can go wrong with a Spyderco, or a Benchmade, or any of a number of the big manufacturers. Here are a few suggestions I have based on what I have owned and enjoyed.

    Iif you enjoy the more traditional look, you have options. Case makes a regular old lockback knife that is very nice and simple and decidedly not a one-hander or an assisted opener. Here is a page with a selection of them: Case Copperlocks from Knife Center

    Spyderco makes a very popular knife called the Native, that is in fact made in Golden, Colorado. Many, many people love this knife, including me. Spyderco Native

    The Griptilian series of knives is very popular, and among my favorites. The AXIS lock mechanism is very secure and a delight to use: A selection of Griptilians

    I personally only have one assisted opening knife, and it is a made in the USA Kershaw Blur. I like it a bunch, and I find it to be an excellent every day carry blade: Kershaw Blur

    Anyway, those are just suggestions. Maybe you like them, maybe you don't. Look around, don't get sucked into ridiculous claims and internet hype positive or negative. Remember, a lock is a mechanical device, and mechanical devices can and will fail regardless of claims to the contrary. These ridiculous torture tests that you see have little to no real world meaning for 99.9% of the tasks that people will do with a knife. They look showy and cool, but are largely based in marketing hype.

    The other thing you can think about it a custom made knife from any of a number of fine makers. It's more coin, but maybe you are at a point in your life where you want something a little fancy or one of a kind or maybe you just want something truly made by hand in America by a real American craftsman. You're going to pay for it, but you're also going to know that your carrying something made by one person, just for you. Ask around, but there are plenty of makers on here and other places that can point you in the right direction.
     
  15. heeler

    heeler Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    2,619
    Thanks for the input TimboKhan.
    Actually I have no issues with a Japanese made knife or vehicle as I have owned many a Japanese motorcycle and trucks.
    I just try very hard not to support a communist police state with my green backs.
    I realize others have no qualms about this at all and that's their decision.
    Now that we have skirted politics lets track back to knives on the High Road.
    Actually this very morning I read up on the Spyderco Native,Centofante,and Delica.
    Spyderco has the strangest looking blades I think I have ever seen,but oddly they kind of grow on you or at least me.
    Good information about the locks.
    After looking at the slice my poor brother received from his accident and his future upcoming operation to repair the tendon a good lock is nothing to over look.
    I shudder just thinking about getting cut like that with a razor sharp blade.
    Ughh!!!
    I should be getting my low cost Buck Vantage Select in the next day or so in the mail and will keep reading and watching youtube reviews on different makes and models as that has helped me on the learning curve a good bit.
    As far as a one handed opener this is something just like a non serrated blade I have decided to stick to as this a very handy thing to be able to open a knife so easily and quickly.
    I say this only by what I have seen on youtube mind you as I have never even held one of these knives.
    Another problem is a lot of places have these knives in a blister type packaging so you cant even hold or operate what your trying to buy.
    Keep the suggestions and information coming.
     
  16. Tirod

    Tirod Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2008
    Messages:
    4,839
    Location:
    SW MO
    If you haven't noticed, most of the traditional makers are now outnumbered by new names, many of them US based. It started with Gerber offering the LST, and then Spyderco with a thumbhole opener and pocket clip. Fiberglass reinforced nylon, thumb opening, and top of the pocket carry have completely changed pocketknife use.

    The next big changeup was the Walker Liner Lock, and possibly the biggest contribution, because he didn't (or couldn't) get a patent on it. Within ten years, just about every knife maker in the mass production world offered a liner lock. And some weren't all that good.

    In terms of the new materials, they do have shortcomings. FRN is not stiff, and requires metal liners to hold it's shape. In smaller knives it's not a problem, over 3" and you'll find even Spyderco abandoned it. Secondly, that S30V steel is incredible, and retains it's sharpness almost as well as it is difficult to resharpen. Diamond hones are the minimum to work on it.

    Any lock isn't guaranteed to always work. Aside from dirt impeding the lockup, a short, thin leaf design is prone to walk out when the blade wobbles against the bushings now used. Teflon washers tend to squeeze down, and adjusting blade play between easy out and secure lockup can be problematic.

    I've found that over the 35 years I've been carrying one, 22 of those with time served in the Army Reserves, one particular type is what I now prefer. It includes the Benchmade Vex, Spyderco Tenacious, or Boker Plus M-type. It's a droppoint, plain edge blade in midgrade steel, with nitrided or titanium surface hardening, a G10 scaled frame or liner lock with clip.

    You can remove a clipped knife, open it, cut, close it, and put it back in the pocket - one handed - in the time it takes to dig out a traditional pocket knife and get it open with two hands. It has nothing to do with tactical - for the working guy, it's simpler, faster, and he has his other hand free to hold onto whatever he's working on. Many tradesmen and suppliers use a knife like that everyday. It's now the standard pattern workingman's knife, whether a simple FRN lockback, or a Strider SnG.

    As for Swiss Army knives, my favorite one is the Rucksack. It locks. But it did give me my worst cut - which is what any knife will do if we don't pay attention.
     
  17. heeler

    heeler Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    2,619
    Tirod,watching a youtube review on the Spyderco Centofante last night I realized it has the FRN handle but has no inner steel liner which thinking about it I was wondering just how well that would work.
    Maybe I am confused but the regular Native I was reading up on is a similiar FRN handle with no inner steel liner.
    Seems to me the inner liner up against the knifes handles would give it superior side strength.
    Not so sure now.
     
  18. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    53,295
    Location:
    0 hrs east of TN
    heeler,

    You don't need a liner for FRN with knives under 3.5". Bigger than that and you start to have flex issues that concern some folks. A lot of companies go to G10 composite handles at that point.

    I carried a Spyderco of one sort or the other for well over a decade. Delicas or Enduras all were FRN handles and none of them ever gave me a moment's trouble. I used them in what was essentially a specialty construction setting.
     
  19. Unistat

    Unistat Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2008
    Messages:
    503
    Location:
    SE Michigan
    For what it's worth, I have nothing but the very best things to say about my Benchmade Mini-Griptillian.
     
  20. DAdams

    DAdams Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2007
    Messages:
    3,081
    Location:
    East Tennessee
    +1 for theNative.

    P4050002.jpg

    Native on the left.

    P1010005-1.jpg
     
  21. Mudinyeri

    Mudinyeri Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2010
    Messages:
    628
    State and local laws vary widely as related to auto-opening or "switchblade" knives. This is one of the reasons that you will have a hard time purchasing such a knife unless you are in the military or a LEO. Depending on your state and local laws, you may be able to find auto-opening knives locally.

    Personally, I prefer a knife that can be opened with one hand so much that I can't imagine ever again purchasing one that requires two hands to open. With that said, I learned to open my old Buck 110 with one hand. Many of the current knives are much easier to open with one hand even if they aren't auto-openers.

    I've become a fan of Benchmade's knives over the last few years but there are other U.S.-made knives that are just as good I'm sure.
     
  22. alaskanativeson

    alaskanativeson Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2008
    Messages:
    798
    Location:
    Back in the Last Frontier
    One thing I want to expound on with the Griptilian, the locking mechanism. The Axis mechanism is smooth and strong, it's what sets these knives apart from all others. It makes opening one handed extremely easy, I have complete confidence in it's locking ability, and yet it's also really easy to close when you are ready to. It's very easy to take the knife apart to clean it and put it back together.
     
  23. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    25,931
    I get by with the KaBar Dozier folder. Simple, light, made in Nationalist China/Taiwan.
     
  24. pikid89

    pikid89 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2009
    Messages:
    1,556
    Location:
    The Gator Nation
    I've got a spyderco endura in my pocket right now...for such a big knife, its super light and handles like a much smaller knife...best edc knife I've ever bought...can be found on amazon for around 50 bucks
    FRN handle and a Full flat grind
    photo.gif
     
  25. SG1

    SG1 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    343
    Location:
    Kentucky
    I have to go +1 on the Kershaw Blur. I was on the fence over the Kershaw Blur versus the Benchmade Griptilian. My boss has the Benchmade. They're both great USA made knives as far as I can tell. I like the lock mechanism on the Benchmade better but went with the Kershaw because of price ($70 vs $100 for the Benchmade).

    After carrying it for nearly a year I love everything about it. Great steel, one hand opening, terrific grip. I opted for the black blade.

    I had a really nice Buck folder (can't remember the model) that was normally around $50 and I got it for $12 at Basspro. Some one stole it from my house a couple months later, but it was a great folder and extremely sharp and light weight. I've always been a fan of Buck knives.

    Good luck in your search! Handle as many of them as you can.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice