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What would happen if you shot a gun in space?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Tech Ninja, Nov 9, 2012.

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  1. sawdeanz

    sawdeanz Member

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    I thought shooting a rifle with muffs on was difficult, imagine doing it with a space helmet on.
     
  2. gunnutery

    gunnutery Member

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    Supposedly the Russians never fired the gun in the OP. So I guess we'll never know exactly what it's like to shoot a gun in space. I'm guessing the Cosmonauts were under strict orders not to shoot it unless it was a life and death situation. Otherwise who wouldn't be curious enough to shoot it, gun guy or not?
     
  3. Sam Cade

    Sam Cade Member

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    Salyut-3 supposedly had a 23mm NS-23 autocannon that worked just fine.
     
  4. Sam Cade

    Sam Cade Member

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    Plugging in some numbers and assuming that the recoil was delivered along the central axis, a man wearing an EVA suit (figure about 350 lbs in 1G) firing the equivalent of a single 55gr 5.56mm round would be propelled rearward at the blistering speed of .68 mph.
     
  5. Sav .250

    Sav .250 Member

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    A nerd might find that of interest but I`ll bet most might being thinking, who cares or at the very least, how is that going to enrich my life?
     
  6. Sam Cade

    Sam Cade Member

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    In order to maximize your enjoyment, I'd recommend you not read threads that don't interest you.
     
  7. Devonai

    Devonai Member

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    In my novels, the Reckless Faith series, the protagonists have to build a ship using advanced alien technology. However, they have to provide many of their own systems, including weaponry. So they steal a couple of GAU 8/A and GAU 19/A weapons systems from the US military and install them as fixed and articulated positions, respectively.

    The ship also has simple force field technology, not enough to provide protection from other weapons but powerful enough to keep the vacuum of space at bay. Those fields are used to protect the parts of their weapons systems that protrude from the hull, not to keep the ammo oxygenated, but to keep them warm. I wouldn't give those hydraulic systems much of a chance at -460 F.

    For simplicity's sake, the ballistics of these weapons are pretty much point-of-aim, point-of-impact. Any minor variances in trajectory due to gravitational forces are automatically calculated by the ship's computer.

    I researched air-to-air missiles extensively for my book, but I couldn't find any conclusive evidence that they'd work in space. As far-fetched as the story is, I didn't want to include anything that was simply impossible. So, no missiles for the good guys.

    Ditto.
     
  8. Doc3402

    Doc3402 Member

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    If you aimed it just right you'd end up with a bullet hole in your asteroid.
     
  9. Sig Bill

    Sig Bill Member

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    The aliens must be anti-gun, have you seen any packing? :p

    Shooting a bullet out toward space will be just like the energizer rabbit, it keeps going, going, going, going...
     
  10. 357Shooter

    357Shooter Member

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    Angry Birds Space will not only answer all your concerns but will also allow you endless hours of practice!
     
  11. k_dawg

    k_dawg Member

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    SpaceBattle.jpg

    *pew* *pew* *pew pew pew*
     
  12. tightgroup tiger

    tightgroup tiger Member

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    Tech Ninja, I absolutely loved that article. Thanks for posting it!
     
  13. Doc3402

    Doc3402 Member

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    Just a thought, but would a 1911 perform as well as a Glock in space? I only ask because of the faster twist of the Glock.
     
  14. Coop45

    Coop45 Member

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    Since there are no whitetail herds in space, how about tofu deer to shoot at?
     
  15. CountryUgly

    CountryUgly Member

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    I love these kinds of threads! It brings out the nerds and gives me a good indicator of who to direct future "over my head" questions to :) All the "egg heads" stand up and take a bow! You're all rockstars in my book ;)
     
  16. Sam Cade

    Sam Cade Member

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    The 1911 would work better. Mostly because the glock would either shatter or be melted.

    In earth orbit you are going to be dealing with temperature ranges of -160ºC to well over 200ºC.
    The nylon glock frame melts at 260ºC or so.


    http://www.amazon.com/Mission-Analysis-Design-Technology-Library/dp/1881883108
     
  17. Doc3402

    Doc3402 Member

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    That answer makes so much sense that the 1911 vs. Glock can of worms will have to remain closed this time. I guess I'll have to resort to the old pistol vs revolver ploy.

    Just kidding folks. Step away from the can opener.

    Seriously though, in a vacuum would rate of spin make a difference? I'm guessing no since there would be no outside influence besides minimal gravity, but I'm not sure.
     
  18. CAR-AR

    CAR-AR Member

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    I'd want to borrow the Stainless Steel Rat's 75 caliber pistol for this job!:neener:
     
  19. AethelstanAegen

    AethelstanAegen Member

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    The TP-82 (the gun in the OP's pic) wasn't really intended for space but mostly to help the crew survive (if need be) on touchdown, since the capsules often landed in remote sections of Siberia.
     
  20. 230RN
    • Contributing Member

    230RN Marines raising the left-leaning Pisa tower.

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    Mullifications:

    A slightly less rifling twist is "needed" in a vacuum because the twist rate required depends on the density of the medium the bullet is going through.

    The difference between the density of air (1.0) and the density of a vacuum (zero) is so minimal it would not be necessary to change the rifling twist.

    And anyhow, the "calculations" for rifling twist are only approximations --quoting an exact number is unnnecessary, especially since other factors like the form and length and material of the bullet are more important.

    In "practice" (heh-heh) all the factors involving orbital speed would cancel out for a shooter and a target in essentially the same orbit for practical ranges and the shooting would pretty much be a straight line affair except possibly for "lead," with no drop calculations needed. In other words, the sights should line up exactly with the axis of the bore to make a hit. The velocity of the bullet in a vacuum would be slightly greater because the bullet does not have to push a column of air out the barrel ahead of it.

    For a bullet fired straight "ahead" in the orbit, the projectile would seek a higher orbit and probably continue to orbit in a more elliptical orbit. The chances of getting hit by your own bullet are almost nonexistent, considering the errors involved accumulating over the well-over 25,000 mile flight around the full orbit. For a bullet fired "backward" in the orbit, the bullet would seek a lower orbit. However, this lower orbit might intersect with the earth. Or at least be slowed by the atmosphere and burn up.

    If that bullet could be fired "backward" at exactly the orbital velocity, it would fall straight down to the earth, but I know of no gun which can fire at any low earth orbital velocities.

    Fun mulling it over, huh?

    Terry
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2012
  21. Bovice

    Bovice Member

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    You know if you fart in space, you'll move!
     
  22. Coop45

    Coop45 Member

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    Are there a lot of Taco Bells in space?
     
  23. gunnutery

    gunnutery Member

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    I was aware of that, but it was still with them in space. You know the thought HAD to at least run through their head once..."what if...?"
     
  24. il.bill

    il.bill Member

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    With a straight face I would then state: "That is what I was aiming at!"
     
  25. il.bill

    il.bill Member

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    I am so glad that I had already swallowed that gulp of coffee before seeing your post.
     
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