Quantcast

Yugo M1924B question

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by MosinT53Hunter, Aug 9, 2018.

  1. MosinT53Hunter

    MosinT53Hunter Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2016
    Messages:
    208
    I had a question for those who know much more than I about this topic. I have been looking at a Yugo M1924B Mauser for a bit, learning, researching, but one thing that is wrong with this one is the bolt is missing, least I think that's the only issue, I don't know for certain as its on on line sale. I was curious, what bolts would be a replacement for it, and would it be more trouble then its worth to even try to get a bolt to fit it? My research has told me that the yugo bolt is a little shorter, and some sources say either a GEW 98 or a 1912 Mexican bolt will fit. I really like the rifle, but I also do my research before buying any projects as well, and I don't want to end up with a "money pit". (I have a few of those already) Still up in the air on this one.

    Thank you to everyone in advance.
     
  2. LoonWulf

    LoonWulf Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    5,975
    Location:
    Hawaii
    Again like you this is just from reading (mostly because I wanted an intermediate length action for a sporter project), the Yugo uses a bolt that's about .25" shorter than a standard K98.
    I see them on eBay and GB for 80-150 bucks pretty regularly.
    You would likely need to have some adjustments to the headspace made if you replace the bolt, so factor in another 50-125 bucks there depending on the work needed and cost of smithing.
     
  3. boom boom

    boom boom Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,941
    Location:
    GA
    A GEW 98 bolt is a standard length bolt for the m98 action. It will fit all standard length Mauser actions but not the Yugo or Mexican action.

    Get the Yugo bolt which do turn up on gunbroker or fleabay from time to time--the Yugo 24/47 and the later m48 were intermediate length mauser actions. The stuff that I have seen on Mexican actions has been pretty thoroughly worn and expensive if markings are present. The model 24 usually had the straight bolt like the VZ 24 or the GEW 98 while the later m48 used the turned down bolt like the mauser 98k. Your stock might require inletting for the bolt handle if you have the standard m24 or m24/47 stock and use a turn down bolt.

    See http://www.hoosiergunworks.com/catalog/mauser_reference.html which lists all of the mauser actions and their specifications. Be careful as the Yugos also got and redid a lot of Mauser 98 actions that are regular length Mauser 98 actions and some of the online auctions don't distinguish between them and the intermediate action.

    Prices on the Yugo bolts are heading up and often go for as much as $100-150 for a full length bolt. Right now, ebay has one at auction starting at 25.00 and a gunbroker auction has an m48 turned down bolt for $46.00 currently. The only joker in the deck is whether the rifle will headspace with a non-matching bolt. Surprisingly, many will pass a field gage goes initially but you need to check the lug engagement (cheaply done with machining fluid) of the bolt receiver combo. Bolts and lugs generally break in when combined and thus headspace can increase beyond a field gage and also accuracy may suffer if engagement is off. A few might exhibit too little headspace thus a no-go gage. It is also wise to be prepared to turn down the barrel and rechamber if necessary which generally requires a gunsmith with a lathe. Often it is cheaper to buy another barrelled receiver and try that with the bolt than doing substantial machining work on an old milsurp.

    If this is all too much, then I would suggest that you have a competent gunsmith look at it and even test fire it for you before firing it yourself or pass on the rifle. Complete rifles are still around from 300-500 if you want a shooter grade Yugo. If you want a pretty shooter grade, then consider a Mitchell Mauser but don't expect a severe collectible.
     
    JeffG, LoonWulf and MosinT53Hunter like this.
  4. MosinT53Hunter

    MosinT53Hunter Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2016
    Messages:
    208

    This is why I come here seeking advice. Thank you so much on this information. Most of what I have been able to gather looking online is some what confusing at times. I believe I will pass up on the Century Arms Yugo mauser at this time. Its too much of a project for me, so much has to be considered before ordering anything. I will stick with my Enfield MKIII and 1916 Spanish Mauser projects. I like projects, but this one I shall pass on, let someone else take it on I guess. Thank you so much for your helpful info boom boom.
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  5. MosinT53Hunter

    MosinT53Hunter Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2016
    Messages:
    208
    Yes, I have come to the same conclusion, looking at prices, and what is available, which is limited at best. I think I will pass on this project, and I thank you for your helpful insight into this matter. Best to come here and ask the experts their opinions on this. Thanks again for the help LoonWulf. :)
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  6. boom boom

    boom boom Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,941
    Location:
    GA
    You are very welcome, lots of folks have helped me on this forum and I try to keep silent on what I don't know and pass on what I have learned. It looks like you already have two worthy projects-let me know if I can help. Through trial and error, I have learned a few things about restoring old rifles. GunnyUSMC is a wealth of knowledge, especially on stock work. LoonWulf, Entropy, and Alexander A, among others etc. also know their rifles and fitting stocks to receivers etc. That is one of the main issues on restoring a sportered Lee-Enfield is fitting the stock properly.

    Sorry for the long post ahead and feel free to ignore,

    I have several flavors of the Lee-Enfields and have restored several--have some good sources for parts if you need any. The 1916 and the older 93 Spanish Mausers are probably one of the easier ones to get parts for right now due to Samco Global stocks being released into the wild. They are pretty straightforward to restore except stocks have been getting expensive. Biggest issue right now is a lot of the Spanish rifles available now are rode hard and put up wet as the saying goes. Rough bores are common along with worn receiver lug recesses (from the 7.62 Nato conversions and wear). It appears that Springfield Sporters will soon be up and running again and they have excellent service and the parts quality is what they say it is or better.

    From a cost standpoint on a new project, my advice (YMMV) is that the easiest to restore is a plain Mauser 98 action of whatever flavor--VZ24, k98, GEW 98, FN, etc. There are still some factory new bolts for them, plenty of original and new barrels, trigger guards, etc, and you can obtain bare receivers for $50 or so. The scrubbed Yugo 98 actions usually marked Preduzece 44 often go quite cheap, and the Czech VZ actions are a bit more expensive but very well made, sometimes even the k98's of wartime vintage show up, and a variety of Mauser 98 stocks are around for not a whole lot.

    The Mauser 98 also has the virtue of not requiring the barrel to be timed. Variants of the M98 such as the Springfield and 1917 Rifles with their coned breech, the P14, etc. with extractor relief, and the Yugo Mauser with its "safety ring" require barrels to be set back one thread for everything to line up. A M98 headspace can often be adjusted merely by turning back the shoulder and finish reaming. Sights are then reinstalled at the new correct barrel timing. There is also still enough interest in sporter 98's that sporting barrels, triggers, etc. are around if you lose the zeal to bring it back to military trim.

    Swede 96 Mausers also have a surplus of new bolts right now on the market but the receivers are generally higher because of the perceived value in Swedish steel and workmanship. Parts are still available but climbing on some key parts. Stocks are around and relatively affordable. The older 95 actions, complete bolts have become very scarce. Of the older actions, the Argentine 91 Mauser still are relatively cheap and barrels in the original caliber are around. Difficulty in these is finding stocks. Plenty of sporterized versions around.
     
    MosinT53Hunter and LoonWulf like this.
  7. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2018
    Messages:
    552
    A 24/47 or m48 will work fine. id get one frome liberty tree colectibles.
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  8. boom boom

    boom boom Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,941
    Location:
    GA
    The O/P was looking at a rifle that needed a bolt. Libertytree is out as are most of the parts places such as Sarco.
    Numrich has them but only as stripped bolts. You would need a firing pin and spring which Numrich does have for the m48 and I believe that the rest of the bolt parts such as the bolt sleeve, cocking piece, and safety are common to other Mauser 98 actions. Not absolutely sure about the cocking piece though. Thus, you are running close to $100 dollars for a bolt plus what you paid for the rifle. You will also probably need to fit the parts for reliable operation and check headspace which can be an issue with mismatched bolt/receiver pairs and relieve the stock for the bolt handle if the stock is an m24.
     
  9. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2018
    Messages:
    552
    Sometimes thats the price u pay buying a action with no bolt. If i can find the number fir the old guy herby i know he will a bolts for under $50.
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  10. LoonWulf

    LoonWulf Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    5,975
    Location:
    Hawaii
    Been there, ended up with an arisaka that was all replacement parts besides the receiver.
    One of my favorite guns now tho
     
  11. MosinT53Hunter

    MosinT53Hunter Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2016
    Messages:
    208
    I had been pricing bolts and possible parts for this if I had gotten it. Cost for me for the rifle without the bolt, with shipping, tax, FFL fee and cost of the rifle is just a couple of bucks under $300. A bit to pay out for a project gun, figured in the end with rough calculating, might cost me around 500 in total with cost of the gun to get it running again...maybe.
     
    boom boom likes this.
  12. LoonWulf

    LoonWulf Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    5,975
    Location:
    Hawaii
    Course I'm into it for well over a grand.....wierd how that happens
     
    MosinT53Hunter likes this.
  13. MosinT53Hunter

    MosinT53Hunter Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2016
    Messages:
    208
    I don't mind a lengthy read, that's one of the main reasons I come here so often is to read and learn from others who know what they are talking about.
    On Springfield Sporters, I have a whole laundry list of items to order, just waiting for them to open again. They had some parts for the 1916 Spanish Mauser that were better priced and in better condition then what Numrich had. I bought a barreled receiver of an Enfield MKIII, and ordered from SS a full stock, lovely parts kit by the way. Even had the full brass butt plate. :)
     
    LoonWulf and boom boom like this.
  14. MosinT53Hunter

    MosinT53Hunter Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2016
    Messages:
    208
    I think that might be me in the future with my Universal M1 carbine. (yes, the aluminum parts in the trigger pack already broke before I got it, one of the risks of buying on gunbroker...off to Numrich!)
     
    LoonWulf and boom boom like this.
  15. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2018
    Messages:
    552
    Ya i got those two type 99s needing to be finished i cant find the firing pin spring i lost them lol. The one with the better barrel i may leave 7.7 the other one id like to get a 44 cal blank and maybe do 44 auto mag. Very easy to make brass.
     
    LoonWulf and boom boom like this.
  16. boom boom

    boom boom Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,941
    Location:
    GA
    That is too much. You can get a complete service grade Mitchell's Mauser Yugo 24/47 for that price @$299. The m48 Service grade is bringing $349 which are fine for shooters. Comparable prices for these on the auction sites or pawnshops etc. if you keep looking. They are not exactly rare. These may or may not have a matched bolt but it should headspace fine.
     
  17. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2018
    Messages:
    552
    Id have a 24/47 over a m48 any day
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  18. boom boom

    boom boom Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,941
    Location:
    GA
    I like the stock lines of the 24/47 and wood better. The straight bolt is meh on operation versus the turn down.
    The m48's elm stock is a fat, heavy, 98k look alike. I don't like the wood whiskers that keep coming off of the stock either.

    That being said, the extra weight help when shooting hot 8mm ammo. Almost all of the model 24's were rearsenaled while most of the m48's were barely used. Mine is the exception and was pretty well used with a somewhat gray bore but shoots okay. It shoots well enough that I have never put a spare m48 barrel on it that is pristine.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice