Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

45acp question

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by cmbrown, Dec 3, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. cmbrown

    cmbrown Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    7
    Hey Everyone,
    before you call me stupid i know i am....i reloaded 100 45acp rounds with 5.2 grs. of bullseye and hornady 230gr. XTP bullets. when i was finished i realized i used CCI magnum large pistol primers instead of standard large pistol primers. my question is with the load being this mild do i have to worry about this or should i break out the bullet puller? thanks for any advice
     
  2. 56hawk

    56hawk Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    Messages:
    1,298
    5.2 grains is a mild load? That's right at max in my book. Regardless I wouldn't worry about the primers too much, I've never noticed that much difference. I would suggest shooting one and checking the brass for signs of pressure. I'm assuming you have shot that load with standard primers before?
     
  3. rsrocket1

    rsrocket1 Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2010
    Messages:
    1,274
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    Being that 5.0g Bullseye has been the standard load for 230g FMJ hardball for a long time, you are not in any real danger. Magnum primers do theoretically add a tiny bit of energy to the shot, but I have interchanged between SP/SPM/SR and LP/LPM and have not seen any difference in chrony data when going from one primer to the other.

    If you are ultra cautious, pull them and count it as penance for carelessness. If you want to know the practical truth, so long as your seat depth wasn't too deep, you honestly won't know the difference. You can also do the scientific thing and work up loads using LPM primers from 4.8 to 5.2g and see if you run into any pressure problems. I'm betting dollars to donuts you won't see any, but then again I'm betting with your money.
     
  4. cmbrown

    cmbrown Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    7
    thanks for the advice. actually 5.2grs is a middle of the road load in all of my books. max is like 5.5 - 5.6grs
     
  5. 56hawk

    56hawk Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    Messages:
    1,298
    Interesting, Lyman 49th lists 5.3 max.
     
  6. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2007
    Messages:
    59,082
    Location:
    Eastern KS
    Alliant lists 5.0 as MAX.
    Lyman #49 lists 5.3 as MAX.
    Speer lists 5.0 as MAX.
    4.7 was the standard mil-spec 230 FMJ load for as long as they used Bullseye powder.

    5.2 is Not middle of the road.

    5.2 is +P, without Mag primers.

    rc
     
  7. 1KPerDay

    1KPerDay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Messages:
    12,701
    Location:
    Happy Valley, UT
    What books?
     
  8. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    Messages:
    7,579
    Location:
    Alabama
    I consider 5.2 grains Bullseye above my max, which is 5.0 grains with a 230 FMJ and standard primers.

    Don’t forget to post the pictures as I would like to add some more handgun blowup’s to my collection

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. KansasSasquatch

    KansasSasquatch Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2012
    Messages:
    1,771
    Location:
    LV county KS
    What gun are you planning to use them in? If its +p rated I wouldn't worry about it. If it isn't, pull the bullets dump the powder and drop down to 4.7-8gr and call it good. Personally for me, if it were a an all steel gun I wouldn't worry about it. If those little junk Kel-Tec guns can handle +p ammo on occasion without kabooms, I doubt a 1911 or similar gun is going to have trouble with an extra .2gr. But do what YOU think is best. I personally stay at least .5gr away from max on all my loads to date as I primarily load mild-moderate target loads.
     
  10. readyeddy

    readyeddy Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2012
    Messages:
    1,132
    The Alliant website has a recipe for 45 ACP, 230 grain Speer TJM RN, 1.26 OAL, barrel length 4.4, CCI 300, 5.7 grains Bullseye at 840 fps.

    If I were using similar parameters, I would shoot the lot. But you gotta make the call for yourself.
     
  11. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2007
    Messages:
    59,082
    Location:
    Eastern KS
    Speer TMJ are plated bullets.

    And JAcketed Hornady XTP's are not shaped the same.
    They have more bearing surface / friction then Speer TMJ bullets.

    rc
     
  12. mljdeckard

    mljdeckard Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2006
    Messages:
    12,705
    Location:
    In a part of Utah that resembles Tattooine.
    That sounds like a good guideline, < .5 gr of max.
     
  13. Tob

    Tob Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2007
    Messages:
    95
    Location:
    La
    I'm curious to see the outcome.
     
  14. mtrmn

    mtrmn Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2011
    Messages:
    877
    Location:
    Louisiana
    Since I shot a couple rounds in my Colt Govt mdl that looked a lot like the bulged rds in these pics, I have been MUCH more wary of loading with fast powders like Bullseye and Acc#2. Just the slightest mistake could mean the difference between safe and a blowup.
     
  15. hentown

    hentown Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2012
    Messages:
    1,742
    To the OP: Slamfire's "dramatic" pics are irrelevant to your loading, as long as you don't double-charge a case. .45ACP is a low-pressure round. The loads you're using won't be dangerous by your use of magnum primers.
     
  16. kerreckt

    kerreckt Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2011
    Messages:
    803
    Location:
    SE Virginia
    I have used magnum primers in small primer .45acp loads which were near max with no problem. I doubt you will have any problem but that is easy for me to say.
     
  17. Swampman

    Swampman Old Fart

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2011
    Messages:
    1,447
    Location:
    East Texas
    This is what I would do, except that I'd probably start at 4.7 grains.
    Better safe than sorry.
    Any load at or near max should be dropped 10% and reworked up for any component change.
    It's an old rule, but a good one.
     
  18. gamestalker

    gamestalker member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2008
    Messages:
    9,832
    Location:
    SW Arizona
    It's your gun, your eye's, and your fingers. But if it was me, I would pull them and fix the issue. Even though the 45 ACP is a low pressure cartridge, but by using a clearly questionable max, or near max charge of a fast burning powder combined with a magnum primer really doesn't sound like a good idea to me.

    GS
     
  19. bds

    bds Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2010
    Messages:
    13,664
    Location:
    Northwest Coast
    +1, good advice IMO.
    Because hollow point bullet bases are seated deeper in the case neck than FMJ/RN profile bullets (which tends to increase chamber pressures), I would reference the Alliant load data for GDHP bullet instead of TMJ RN bullet - http://www.alliantpowder.com/reloaders/powderlist.aspx?type=1&powderid=1&cartridge=35
    As to those posting that it is safe to fire overmax powder charge with magnum pistol primers, OP did not even post the OAL and the pistol being used. Since we are working with several unknowns, I would also suggest OP pull the 100 finished rounds and conduct a new powder workup from 4.5 gr. I feel like we have read enough of "Funny thing happened at the range today" threads ...
     
  20. Coldfinger

    Coldfinger Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2011
    Messages:
    178
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Ditto on the polymer frame gun. If you were to shoot them from a steel frame it may be different. As previously stated, if you are questioning the safety of your loads pull them. My single caliber Lyman handbook states that they have experienced pressure differences of up to 2000 psi just by changing brands. Magnum primers will also increase case pressure. If you were loading .40 I would definitely advise you to pull them. If your not comfortable with the thought of what could happen pull 'em.
     
  21. dirtengineer

    dirtengineer Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Messages:
    315
    Location:
    Southeast WA
    My answer depends on what gun you plan to use to shoot them.
     
  22. Swampman

    Swampman Old Fart

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2011
    Messages:
    1,447
    Location:
    East Texas
    While I'm all for safety, I personally wouldn't immediately pull all the bullets and start over.
    Do as I suggested in my previous post.
    Using identical components, work the load up from 4.7 grains using the same COAL and crimp as the already loaded rounds.
    If at any point during the workup you run into pressure signs, immediately stop, and then pull the bullets and dump the powder. Then resize the cases with the decapping pin removed and reload the cases with a safe charge that you "proved" during your workup.
    If the workup shows that the loads are safe, shoot 'em!
    There's no need to break down the ammo as a knee jerk reaction.
    You'll still be following safe reloading practices, just a little out of order.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page