Anybody strip a Marlin mar-shield stock?

CraigC

Sixgun Nut
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Jan 27, 2006
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West Tennessee
I've got a levergun from the early `90's I need to refinish this winter. Wondering if standard chemical strippers work on it or if I'm in for a mess.
 
I have.
With a good stripper, it’s no problem.
I can’t remember the brand, but one I used was junk. I got it at Walmart, iirc.
The other, I got at an Ace Hardware, and it made short work of the finish.
Kwick-Strip, IIRC.
Aircraft Paint stripper works great! Works real good on airplane propellers, too.
But be sure to use heavy rubber gloves and a well ventilated area!

First, use some medium-coarse sand paper to “rough” the finish. Then spread the stripper generously on the surface, then set piece down and take a break. I then follow with a 3m scrunge pad to wipe the stripper and bubbled up finish.
It may take two, or three applications of stripper to remove.

I then prefer to use a medium to dark walnut stain, but I once got a really good result mixing some dark walnut with maghony (red-ish) stain. I followed up with clear Polyurethane satin varnish. Several light coats.
I’ve also used Danish Oil dark walnut stain/finish. I use 0000-steel wool to spread it on. Leave it wet. Let dry for 2-days, then repeat 6-8 times until grain is filled. Then wax and enjoy!
For checkered areas, use a bronze brush to work in stripper and remove finish. Apply new finish with a tooth brush. Wipe with soft cloth.
 
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I have.
With a good stripper, it’s no problem.
I can’t remember the brand, but one I used was junk. I got it at Walmart, iirc.
The other, I got at an Ace Hardware, and it made short work of the finish.
Knick-Strip, IIRC.
Aircraft Paint stripper works great! Works real good on airplane propellers, too.
But be sure to use heavy rubber gloves and a well ventilated area!

First, use some medium-coarse sand paper to “rough” the finish. Then spread the stripper generously on the surface, then set piece down and take a break. I then follow with a 3m scrunge pad to wipe the stripper and bubbled up finish.
It may take two, or three applications of stripper to remove.

I then prefer to use a medium to dark walnut stain, but I once got a really good result mixing some dark walnut with maghony (red-ish) stain. I followed up with clear Polyurethane satin varnish. Several light coats.
I’ve also used Danish Oil dark walnut stain/finish. I use 0000-steel wool to spread it on. Leave it wet. Let dry for 2-days, then repeat 6-8 times until grain is filled. Then wax and enjoy!
For checkered areas, use a bronze brush to work in stripper and remove finish. Apply new finish with a tooth brush. Wipe with soft cloth.
Very good. I may try the Citristrip and if it doesn't work, then the epoxy remover. Thanks for the info!


Not with chemicals. I usually take the finish down using wood scrapers.
Tough to scrape it out of checkering.
 
I have used the Citrus Strip with okay results. It takes multiple applications. To get into checkering use a toothbrush or even a soft brass brush. Then I went back with Tru Oil.
 
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I have used the Citrus Strip with okay results. it takes multiple applications. To get inot checkering use a toothbrush or even a soft brass brush. Then I went back with Tru Oil.
It's definitely not as effective as the other stuff but it doesn't eat through all my gloves. I've used it to good effect on Uberti stocks. Just takes more applications.
 
Craig, as Dave pointed any chemical is very harsh on stocks, sanding won't change the original wood color. Unless you want to stain, paint or use another method for finishing.
I've found using three different # sandpapers plus an orbital sander fulfill my intention on woodworking projects in general when sanding is needed.
 
Craig, as Dave pointed any chemical is very harsh on stocks, sanding won't change the original wood color. Unless you want to stain, paint or use another method for finishing.
I've found using three different # sandpapers plus an orbital sander fulfill my intention on woodworking projects in general when sanding is needed.
The stock is checkered, chemically stripping it is the only solution. How harsh it is is really irrelevant. I also don't want to take off so much wood that it effects the way they fit.
 
I recently refinished part of my Marlin stock to cover up some wear marks and holes. High grit sandpaper (500 I believe) worked through the polyurethane top coat easily. Citristrip is my go to for nearly any wood project I need to refinish. But didn't need to strip it on mine.

When I did a complete refinish of my neighbor's older Marlin, the polyurethane coating on his was long gone. A bottle of "LA's Totally Awsome" cleaner (yellow liquid) from Dollar Tree removed the varnish faster than anything I had used. As well as all the dirt and grime. Much cheaper and faster than Citristrip.
 
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