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anyone use a Hornady GS-1500

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by jim8115, Mar 11, 2012.

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  1. jim8115

    jim8115 Member

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    I bought one of these and it is just not accurate. I have changed the batteries, made sure no draft, etc. I also have a RCBS beam scale, in the same location that works fine. I just thought an electronic one would be easier for these old eyes to read. the only way it will work right is to Tare it between each weigh.
    Example, using a primer for a constant,if i weigh a it , it weighs 4.7 grains, take it out of the tray, set it in again, and it weighs different.. same primer. if I do this 10 times in a row, it will vary from 4.1 all the way to 4.9...

    JIM
     
  2. Scimmia

    Scimmia Member

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    I use one. I just tried the test you proposed, weighing a CCI large rifle primer 10 times in a row without a tare, it read 5.1 gr 9 times and 5.0 gr 1 time. I turn it on, let it sit a bit, then do a tare before I start weighing.

    With the variation you're seeing, I would suggest calling Hornady.
     
  3. chrome_austex

    chrome_austex Member

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    Yeah, I didn't like the GS-1500 that my kit came with. I had to replace it after a hard jolt to the table rendered the thing useless (no, it didn't drop and hit the floor). It would read a whole +4 grains heavy for my 44gr 308 rounds, yup it was reading 40 grains of powder as 44 grains ... EVEN THO IT 'PASSED' THE LARGE CALIBRATION WEIGHT. I tossed it after I shot that round of handloads and noticed they were shooting way low (due to seriously low powder/ velocity), and discovered the error after buying some smaller sized check weights.

    FWIW, Now I distrust ALL electronic powder measures (at least the cheap ones I've owned). The cheap Frankford Arsenal unit I currently use seems to be made with the same (chinese?) internals as the GS-1500, and works about equally badly as the Hornady unit before it's big jolt. The 'tare' weight of the empty pan varies about 0.4 grains, AFTER it has warmed up (at least both units do warn you to let them warm up for a minute or so before using them). However, unlike the Hornady, the FA unit still works, and I've learned to trust my instincts.. when it starts to seem fishy, it probably is. New batteries have 'fixed' it every time so far. The FA unit actually skips some numbers (for example, it NEVER reads 24.4 grains, only 24.3 and 24.5. Both units claim 0.1 grain accuracy, but clearly do not provide it. They're 0.2 grains or worse.

    That stupid powder measure and the Hornady one-shot lube nearly put me off Hornady products all-together.

    If anyone has a line on an electronic measure (preferably cord-fed) that is accurate AND precise to +-0.1 grains and costs less than $200, I'd love to hear about it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2012
  4. jim8115

    jim8115 Member

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  5. Axleman27

    Axleman27 Member

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    Mine gave inconsistent measurements and was slow to react to trickling. I bought a Redding beam scale and have been very pleased with it. It is just as fast if not faster, is easy to set up and work with and is spot on accurate.
     
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