H&R 732

Mr. Mosin

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Jun 26, 2019
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I have an H&R 732 on layaway (I’m broke and poor)- I saw it for a deal, and couldn’t pass it up; not when my father and family had similar in years back. I fully intend for this bugger to be my BUG to my Makarov, but I’ve questions regarding it.

From what I’ve found thus far, most seem to agree that H&R’s revolvers were similar to Ruger’s offerings- tank-like, though not necessarily attractive and a bit utilitarian. How true is this statement- ie, will this 732 hold up to daily carry and usage around the farm, etc ?

Recommendations on both holsters for concealment in pocket and OWB carry are appreciated, as are loadings for defensive usage (I’m thinking a full hard cast wadcutter).

I’ve also read that certain S&W grips will fit- how true is this, and what does the availability of parts look like, if necessary ? Any other recommendations (besides “don’t disassemble it”) ? Will any accessories common to other manufacturers interchange or be made to work ?

Thank you in advance.
 
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I have never seen an H&R compared to a Ruger.

The post war revolvers by H&R I've always been a bit suspect of as the one 732 I tried to buy had timing issues. I saw a video recently of one being repaired, but frankly the 732 doesn't offer much. Top break .32 Longs are, IMO, better as they were built on frames and with internals meant for .38 S&W.

The 732 was designed to bring H&R into the 20th Century, the revolver itself was built for the .22 and .32. IDK, but I'd rather have an H&R .32 built on a frame meant for .38 and those are easy to get for under 150.
 
It should serve you well if it hasn't been abused over the years and I think your ammo choice is a good option. Check out Lucky Gunner's testing on 32's for some info there;

I wouldn't compare it to a Ruger. I have been tempted to work on the trigger some but haven't been up to taking it apart.

When I was a kid, most of the old men I knew wore bib overalls all the time. The chest pocket on them seemed to be made to hold a small frame revolver, and most of them were a 32 S&W or Long of some flavor. Could see the outline of it worn into the cloth. They have been passed by in history but are still a capable tool for what they are.
 
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While H&R could make a good product when they were solvent, the company rode difficult financial waves for many decades.

The hands and ratchets of their later revolvers were delicate to begin with and heat treatment was suspect as quality slipped. Timing problems will surface in high-mileage examples. They are nowhere near Ruger in terms of durability.

Many models used a plastic mainspring shoe which will shatter eventually as well. There are metal replacement parts available and they are easy enough to swap, however.

Finish-wise, they offered a resonably tough matte nickel, but blued examples rust with alacrity if not kept oiled.

If you've found a lightly-used example and limit the round count, it could serve as an adequate carry peice- though in a world of $250 PSA Daggers, LCPs, Beretta APX, etc....IMO there are better options.

Still, if thats what you want, Buffalo Bore makes a good factory SD load.
 
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I had two of those and gave one to my former FiL. I still have the other. Mine were the 32 H&R magnum versions.

They go bang. They remind me MUCH more of Charter Arms than Ruger.

I would expect it to go bang for maybe a few thousand rounds total, if you're good to it.

I remember them being on sale for $89 NiB in the mid/early 80's.

 
Just saw one of these at my LGS in great shape.
I considered one back in the '90s as my first handgun...


The shop owner remarked that he was surprised what they go for now, and he remembered when they were considered a $75 gun. I told him that .32 caliber in general has made somewhat of a comeback in recent years.
 
If it shoots OK right now, I wouldn't worry about durability too much.

YMMV. To me, where durability matters most is frequent, hard use, which is something different than a BUG. Keep it clean, check for rust, change the ammo regularly, and shoot it a few times a year to make sure you remember where the fixed sights group.

Personally I'd also choose something with a bit more oompf than a .32 Long, but again that's just me. FIWW, my BUG of choice is a S&W 637 Airweight with .38 Special +Ps.
 
i hate to be a naysayer. i have a h&r 22lr revolver buried somewhere in my safe. i got it because of nostalgia: it was made 50mi east of my hometown, and most adult males had one stashed away somewhere in a barn, toolshed or fishing tackle box when i was a kid. mine shoots ok, but trigger pull is stout. it’s not a 22lr handgun that i would enjoy plinking much with, nor would i have it as my one and done 22lr handgun. if it were to break i wouldn’t bother repairing it, but sell it to the next “gun buyback” scheme.

if were in o.p.’s shoes now, wanting a 32 revolver, i would save my pennies further and apply my layaway to a new, lifetime warrantied, taurus 327 revolver and load it with 32longs.

32 is an unsung caliber that truly needs more pistol and revolver platforms. if the newly-released heritage roscoe revolver is truly meant to be evocative of the 1930s-40s it should be offered as a 6-shot in 32long before 38sp.
 
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While H&R could make a good product when they were solvent, the company rode difficult financial waves for many decades.

The hands and ratchets of their later revolvers were delicate to begin with and heat treatment was suspect as quality slipped. Timing problems will surface in high-mileage examples. They are nowhere near Ruger in terms of durability.

Many models used a plastic mainspring shoe which will shatter eventually as well. There are metal replacement parts available and they are easy enough to swap, however.

Finish-wise, they offered a resonably tough matte nickel, but blued examples rust with alacrity if not kept oiled.

If you've found a lightly-used example and limit the round count, it could serve as an adequate carry peice- though in a world of $250 PSA Daggers, LCPs, Beretta APX, etc....IMO there are better options.

Still, if thats what you want, Buffalo Bore makes a good factory SD load.

This is pretty much spot-on, IMO. I picked up a Model 733 cheaply a couple months before COVID hit. I like it for what it is, a small, cheap gun. It's certainly not in the class of any Ruger ever made.

The single action trigger isn't bad but double action is pretty stiff.

HR733.jpg

It came with the plastic mainspring shoe, which shattered as soon as any lateral pressure was applied to it when I removed the grips. Numrich carries replacement with a steel shoe. If yours comes with the plastic part immediately order the steel replacement from Numrich (or elsewhere).

If you plan on using it for defense I highly recommend using wadcutters so you at least have the ability to punch a clean, ~5/16" hole in an assailant. If you're a handloader you can put together wadcutters or SWC rounds that will be more effective than the factory RN. Starline makes good brass. Prvi Partizan brass is good, too. I found Fiocchi brass to have tight primer pockets.

A friend has a 732 in exactly the same config except for the finish. He's taken it apart and remarked on the cheap construction and that it's kind of a pain to reassemble.

I wouldn't expect it to take high round counts.
 
From what I’ve found thus far, most seem to agree that H&R’s revolvers were similar to Ruger’s offerings- tank-like,
If a gun salesman or salesmen told you that, drop that store as a reliable gun store or gun source.
You may even want to ask if they prefer indica or sativa when they smoke their breakfast.
 
Ruger has always made guns of top quality. H&R has always made guns that were inexpensive, but were good value for the price. They are not comparable. And that is despite the fact that I learned pistol shooting with an H&R 999, and felt it was a good gun. I have owned two Ruger revolvers, and both made me think "This is built like a bank vault". They were that solid and precise. H&Rs are not like that, but they didn't cost as much either.

I had an H&R 732 for a while, because I like 32 revolvers, and I did not care for it. By then I was used to better guns, I guess, and the sights, grip, and trigger pull made it no fun to shoot. I like 32 Long a lot, but it's too low powered to recommend for self defense, and too expensive to recommend for practice shooting. (Unless you reload it, maybe. People have said it can be cheaper than 22 LR if you reload it, and shoot enough to spread out the cost of the dies.)

But if it's got sentimental value, sure, get one. It won't be the only pistol you ever buy. If I didn't already have my father's High Standard Model C, I would have bought one, because of how he told me how much he enjoyed his.
 
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