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Is there something inherently different in Glock pistols?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by TheProf, Mar 22, 2015.

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  1. Sol

    Sol Member

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    I believe that any weapon can be great in terms of durability, reliability and value.

    The guns you mention are probably as good as the glock 43.

    I think the only thing that sets glock apart the rest is the marketing it does and the exposure it recieves.
     
  2. HammsBeer

    HammsBeer Member

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    Glock in one word - Marketing.

    They built a reliable, simple to use, simple to service pistol, sold it to police departments at steep discounts, touted how many PD's use Glocks so they must be the best, get some tv shows to call everything a Glock, and wait for the whirlwind of sales.

    Glocks are nothing special except they were one of the first mainstream polymer pistols on the market, and have QC that puts out a consistently decent product.
     
  3. Skribs

    Skribs Member

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    Something that is morr popular is inherently better due to more knowledgeable gunsmiths and third party parts.
     
  4. Sol

    Sol Member

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    AR-15 *cough* *cough*.
     
  5. JDR

    JDR Member

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    The full size G's just flat out do what they are designed to do. I've put many thousands of rounds through my Gen3 17 in the last 6 years, but I have other nines that I shoot a little better and probably like better, like my BHP, my STI Trojan 9mm, my Sig P225 and P228, my HK P30, and my CZ 75B. My Gen4 21 holds its own wih my HK45, but my Dan Wesson Valor 1911 is still my best.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2015
  6. barnbwt

    barnbwt member

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    The only inherent difference is Glock can get away with selling pistols that are way more plain-looking than the competition. The various poly striker guns are all functionally identical, and if made to good standards (and it's not like Glock is particularly magnificent in that regard; all the major brands are generally on par) demonstrably identical.

    TCB
     
  7. edmo01

    edmo01 Member

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    The key to the famed GLOCK reliability is in the polymer.

    They use only the most select polymers mined in GLOCK's exclusive polymer mines located in eastern Austria.

    Edmo
     
  8. Tallball

    Tallball Member

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    Yaon and CM - I am being 100% honest, no failures of any kind in the one Ruger or the three S&W. I am not exaggerating. However, it's all about the circumstances.

    I have owned three Rugers. One was a Single Six 22 revolver. I shot it for 30 years or so with no malfunctions ever. Actually, that isn't all that surprising. It was a single action 22 revolver. I would expect it to function perfectly (with proper cleaning) practically forever, until a spring or part wore out. That would take a LONG time with a 22. I have had a Blackhawk 45 for five years or so. I have maybe shot a thousand rounds through it. It is completely unsurprising that it has functioned correctly. It is a very strong pistol that has been shot sparingly with light loads. My third is an LC9. I have owned it less than a year and haven't shot it much - maybe 200 rounds. Doubtless it would screw up eventually, but I haven't given it much opportunity.

    The Smith story is similar. I own three, and have had them less than a year apiece. One is a... sd40ve I think they are called. It bores me like most plastic guns, so I have only put a couple of hundred rounds through it. The 32 revolver and the 38 revolver are about 100 years and 80 years old. I think the 32 was carried a fair amount and shot very little. It locks up very tightly. The 38 has been shot a lot more, but it is still mechanically very sound. And I only fire light loads through it.

    Really, none of this is surprising, given the exact circumstances. I think the moral of the story is that if you want zero malfunctions, your odds are better with revolvers.
     
  9. herrwalther

    herrwalther Member

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    I am probably reading too much into this but Glock is the new kid on the block based on company lineage. Companies like Ruger, S&W, Springfield and Walther have been around for much longer. Glock does one style of firearm that was popular enough to be accepted by LEO based on a per unit cost, that trickled into civilian use.

    As far as reliability, any firearm can fail. Even the supposedly ironclad, infallible Glock. I have had brand new Glocks fail and fail very badly. And on the same hand have had zero malfunctions with my Walther and minor malfunctions with Rugers, Taurus, Smith and other brands I have owned. Preventative maintenance such as proper cleaning and oiling will eliminate MOST firearm issues. Parts breaking or out of spec are relatively rare for modern firearms compared to how things used to run 100 years ago.
     
  10. Deaf Smith

    Deaf Smith Member

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    Well herrwalther,

    While Ruger and S&W have been here a while, their polymer handguns have not (and some of S&W first polymer guns didn't fare so well.

    Add to that what armies of the world have adopted ANY polymer handguns other than Glocks?

    And what countries use Glocks?

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glock

    Sure some Glocks have failed, considering how many have been made, but Glocks are favored around the world, and that is a fact.

    Deaf
     
  11. tepin

    tepin Member

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    Glock is the only defensive brand I'll buy.
     
  12. george burns

    george burns Member

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    That's all I am saying, if you are going to reach for a weapon to save your life, you would want the one with the least amount of failures. Glock may lack certain refinements here and there, but most of us agree that the chances of it firing when we need it to is probably better than the average gun regardless of price.
    That's all I want out of my defensive handgun, not a 3 lb trigger or hand tuned action, that may decide not to function that day, just the reliability, I will do the rest.
    Like Deaf eluded to, the cops and military wouldn't be so stuck on them if there was something more reliable. Throw them in the mud, run them over and they still shoot, even with a broken guide rod mine fired.
    And I have heard several times from places like Front sight, that the guys that show up with fancy pants guns, have to borrow a glock to finish their 2 or 3 day course, as their 1911's stop running and seldom if ever finish the course.
     
  13. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    I'm on record here and elsewhere -- as saying that in 10-15 years, the only way to you'll be able to get a steel, hammer-fired semi-auto gun will be to buy an old one, or go to a custom gunsmithing shop.

    I clicked on the link you provided and was surprised that so many militaries bought them. We should note, however, that no single military in the West, other than the US, BUYS THAT MANY HANDGUNS, and relatively few troops are actually issued handguns in any military unit (other than MPs and the folks running "armored" equipment). Then, too, few other countries have close to as large a standing army as the US! Great Britain's Army is the newest convert -- giving up their long-treasured BHPs (or did those guns eventually morph into FN HPs?) I also saw something recently that one the USMC's Special Ops teams CAN now use Glocks -- it's not an "issued" weapon, but one available for use if the individual wants. I think some SEALS like Glocks, too.

    The U.S. government's federal agencies use Glocks, too, but also a surprising number of SIGs -- M11A1/228s and 229s (Coast Guard, some special units, Special Ops, air units, etc.) Many nations -- the US seems to be the biggest exception -- like to buy weapons made in their own country. That's why Turkey, Argentina and Brazil have big firearm industries: they started out getting the rights to make to make "foreign" gun at home and then, after the system was established, made their own. Metal frames are not dead, but they're not exactly lapping the competition, either.

    I think Glock has been successful because 1) the company knows how to sell their product, 2) it is relatively inexpensive to make (allowing them to make sweetheart deals when they need to), and 3), most importantly, it uses a relatively simple but durable design. I really like the new Ruger SR9/SR9c, and think it does almost everything Glock does, BETTER than Glock does -- but I think there are as many parts in the Ruger fire control system (striker, trigger, etc.) as you'll find in the entire Glock weapon!! The simplicity of the design is part of it's allure: you can do almost anything yourself with a simple guide book and almost no tools.

    Then, too, the ad agency guy or gal who came up with "Glock Perfection" marketing concept has probably already retired, and just chuckles when he or she thinks about how well that theme has worked as s/he sips the beverage of their choice at the beach...

    Glock has NOT tried to branch out into other type of firearms. They are not FN, for example. It may be that they'll stick with handguns. They found a unique market niche when they introduced the Glock 17; I suspect it would be much harder to do something similar with long guns. (Kel-Tec continues to do that, however.)

    If Glock could just develop a BETTER TRIGGER without making major changes to their basic design, I think they could dominate the handgun world. I'm also surprised that Glock never developed (as far as I can tell) their own Custom Shop to support the guns used in the gun games. That custom shop-type support all comes from after-market providers. (I've even seen metal-frames for Glocks, and entire after-market internals and cost almost as much as the basic Glock weapon!)

    Maybe they'll wake up, one of these days, and try to gild the lily... They know how to sell their weapons, but they seem to be slow on really IMPROVING them... It's taken them 25 years to get the grips more user-friendly and "flexible" (i.e., more adjustable).
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2015
  14. Plan2Live

    Plan2Live Member

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    This exemplifies the "problem" with Glock. Nothing wrong with the product, it's the fan base that is the turn off to most non-Glock owners.
     
  15. Skribs

    Skribs Member

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    Ignoring an object because you don't lile the people that like it is one of the silliest ideas I've ever heard.

    I don't like some of the people who drink water, should I only drink root beer?
     
  16. DeepSouth

    DeepSouth Member

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    Seriously, yes its inherently different.
    Can you name another porcelain gun, that doesn't show up on airport metal detectors, made in Germany that costs more than you make in a month?
    Of course not!

    Nothing like the Glock 7




    Couldn't help it :eek:
     
  17. Plan2Live

    Plan2Live Member

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    Yeah, I guess it's almost a silly as over the top fanboyism. Not quite, but close.
     
  18. 45_auto

    45_auto Member

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    If Glock's acceptance by LEO's was based on unit cost, why didn't all the LEO's change over to Hi-Points when they came out in 1992?
     
  19. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    Probably for the same reason the U.S. Department of Defense didn't select an International Scout instead of the HUMVEE (built by AM General) when they needed a new High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle. The Scouts were still in production, and I'm sure the unit costs would have been much lower.

    Put simply, they weren't designed to do the same job.

    When various LEO agencies started evaluating Glocks and comparing them to the weapons offered by Beretta, Ruger, S&W, and SIG -- and in a few cases H&K -- all other things being similar (and they were) costs were an important consideration. And Glock not only offered very low unit costs, they also bought the existing service weapons. They BOUGHT their way into the US market, and were instrumental in changing the nature of how weapons were sold to LEO agencies here in the U.S. S&W and SIG and Beretta now use similar tactics, and the playing field is more level.
     
  20. 45_auto

    45_auto Member

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    So they offered equivalent or superior performance to S&W, SIG and Beretta but at a lower cost to the purchasing LEO agency? Why do some people seem to think that was a bad thing back then but is a good thing now?
     
  21. Deaf Smith

    Deaf Smith Member

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    I agree!

    I also feel since most of the mags made for Glocks are made by Glock then the gun works right! Way to many aftermarket 1911 parts and mags are just awful.

    Now I don't knock Sigs. I have two of 'em and they work very very well.

    To me SIGs and Glocks are the worlds right arm. Yea I know Beretta but to me it's not that good a gun. Sorry folks!

    Deaf
     
  22. FireInCairo

    FireInCairo member

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    The Glock design is very simple compared to other pistols. This makes it easier to take apart and work on. Some pistols have tons of little springs and kitty-corner assemblies that benefit automated production to make. The Glock is something you can open up the hood on and feel comfortable replacing or modifying.

    And, yes, because of this simplicity of design they are known for reliability.

    That being said, they're not perfect. Here are some knocks:

    - they are no longer using their tennifer finish anymore, which means the finishes scratch/wear a lot easier

    - while the trigger safety is decent, Glocks have seen their fair share of negligent/accidental discharges. They also have a lot of guns out there, but it pays to be really careful reholstering a Glock in my opinion. I think Springfield's grip safety is perfect as it allow for reholstering with the pad of your thumb on the rear of the slide (many don't agree, it's a matter of opinion).

    - their grips are kind of blocky and don't really suit smaller hands
     
  23. gun_with_a_view

    gun_with_a_view Member

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    The big difference between Glocks and other semi autos is the grip. Instead of steel,aluminum or polymer, the Glock uses a simple 2X4 piece of southern yellow pine wood known for it's superior shear and tensile strength. Some people must really dig that because the darn guns are all over the place, negligently discharging frequently.
     
  24. OilyPablo

    OilyPablo Member

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    Glock has the loose chamber down to a science. I don't mean that in a bad way, but it's their main path to so few feeding issues. Anyone who has purchased a LW barrel knows this in an odd way. Glock (now) knows the dimensions to hold to avoid case blow outs, yet feed loose and fast.
     
  25. Lman57

    Lman57 Member

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    I have a Glock 17 3rd gen it works great never a problem with thousands of rounds it eats any kind of ammo I feed it.
     
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