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Looking for info on 32 S&W CTG

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by simonejh, Apr 11, 2010.

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  1. simonejh

    simonejh Member

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    I inherited a 32 S&W CTG from my dad. I think he brought it home with him after WWII. He was stationed in France. It is similar to pictures I have seen of a 32 S&W CTGE. It is hammerless, has a back strap saftey, and an unusual trigger. Serial # 182916. Just looking for information and possible worth. Thanks.
     

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  2. DickM

    DickM Member

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    You have a Smith and Wesson Safety Hammerless 3rd Model, manufactured between 1909 and 1937. Your serial number would place the gun toward the beginning of that period, and I would estimate a manufacturing date of around 1914. Because of the safety feature on the back of the grip, these guns are sometimes called "Lemon Squeezers." The designation 32 S&W CTG doesn't refer to the gun but rather the caliber that it's chambered for - "CTG" is an abbreviation for "cartridge."

    They have some collector value. Although it's difficult to tell from your picture, yours appears to be in reasonably good condition and if its mechanically sound (which of course we can't tell from the photo) with much of its original bluing and no rust (as it appears) it might be worth in the range of several hundred dollars.
     
  3. Gatofeo

    Gatofeo Member

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    I admit I'm not up on the older Smith & Wessons, but that photo is rather blurry.
    Could it, instead, be a European copy of the S&W? Spain and Belgium were particularly bad for ignoring international patents and producing nearly exact copies of American and British firearms.
    These copies varied in quality from okay to dangerous to fire.
    I've seen some Spanish copies of Smith and Wesons that were obviously pot metal. The giveaway is typically the lack of Smith & Wesson markings, but there is usually a reference on the barrel to Smith & Wesson and the cartridge, spelled out or an acronym.
    I'm not disputing you, DickM, but considering that the poster's father brought it back from Europe, it could very well be an inferior copy.
     
  4. DickM

    DickM Member

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    Yes, I thought about that as well, but all of the features of the gun (as best I could tell from the somewhat blurry photo) and the serial number were correct for the model I quoted, so I concluded it was a genuine S&W. It certainly could be a forgery, and they're out there, but I didn't think so based on the information available.
     
  5. simonejh

    simonejh Member

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    Thanks for the info. The picture was taken with my phone. I will take better pictures.
     
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