New 3D Printed Case Feeder for the Lee Pro 6000

9mmepiphany

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I was an early adopter of the Lee Six Pack Pro (SPP) and have become a big fan…and a Lee fan…of the direction that they are going. It is really nice that the SPP comes with a case feeder.

My only concern with the case feeder was that it was attached to the shellplate assembly and moved up and down as you stroke the handle. I have three foot long tubes for additional case capacity (40 .45 ACP cases per tube) and having that much mass being raised and lowered with each stroke didn’t seem like a good idea.

I wasn’t quite ready to add a motorized collator, so looking around the internet turned up a 3D printed case feeder which changed the attachment point to the SPP frame…Lee was even nice enough to provide a hole to attach the feeder there. The case feeder is designed by Grimnir3D out of Norway and he offers the 3D prints or the completed unit (including hardware) on Etsy

I inspected it when I received it and found the printing to be of very high quality. All surfaces fit well and slide smoothly against each other. There was no drag on the pivot pin (white metal pin that the trigger assembly rotates on).The nuts screwed smoothly onto the threaded support with hardly any drag. There was no flash that had to be cleaned off. I installed the case feeder according to the video instructions which can be accessed via a QR code packed with the unit.

The case feeder had enough interesting features that I thought members might enjoy an explanation/description of how it functioned

Here it is mounted on the Pro 6000. It mounts to the existing hole in the frame just above the case slider, using the long bolt from the Lee Universal Case Feeder and one of the nuts. 20240127_153629.jpg
 
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The main attachment post for the unit includes a flange that snugs up against the die station to help with alignment
20240125_164643.jpg

As the shell plate is raised, the case slider is pushed up to the Trigger Bar which levers up the Trigger Assembly to allow a case to drop. The Tigger Assembly is powered by a stout spring
20240127_155042.jpg
 
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The following case is caught as the Trigger Assembly returns after the first case is dropped and the shell plate lowered. When my Trigger Bar is adjusted correctly the lip of the Trigger Assembly catches the extraction groove on the next case 20240125_164624.jpg


A nice feature of the Trigger Bar is that it is reversible, with the teeth on one side being 2mm off from the other…allowing adjustment in 2mm increments
20240127_154913.jpg


The feeder assembly may be adjusted both vertically, up or down the main support bolt, or horizontally, in and out, on the bolt to allow adjustment for different cartridge heights and diameters. One important point is to insure that the Trigger Lever does not contact the feeding tubes to restrict movement
20240125_164953.jpg
 
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Trial running the feeder has shown that it works very reliably…I ran 40 cases through as a test. I’m using three foot long tubes which each hold 40 .45ACP cases and the trigger assembly’s ability to keep additional cases from following the first case was not affected by the weight of the column
20240125_165403.jpg

Here are the left over/unused parts from the Universal Case feeder...the plastic parts aren't special, they are really black; the picture was just underexposed. The bench top is black also
20240130_103733.jpg
 
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You need a step ladder to add brass..... :what:
It's a little exaggerated by prospective .

I can dump cases into the Hornady LNL case feeder (on the right) while standing on the ground. To reach the collator atop the Lee tubes, I have a two-step Rubbermaid step stool
 
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Nice write up. I ordered mine and got it a few days ago. I have to agree that it's worth every penny. It's super stout, very well designed, easy to adjust with the huge knurled nuts, and honestly Just Works™. It took maybe 2 minutes to install, a cartridge change takes less than 30 seconds, and no more fiddling with wrenches.

These really are massive productivity enhancements that address the few weak spots in an otherwise great product. I'd say the same about the APP Press. I put a new case feeder on that one too.
 
Looks like you have a little factory going there too.
Not really anything special.

I load a lot of 9mm for competition, training, and teaching and usually load in runs of 1k...so that's done on the Mark 7 Apex-10 on the left. I've just started loading .45ACP and have the Pro 6000 set up for it in the middle. On the left is my first press the Hornady LNL AP that I load my competition .38Spl on. I spend a lot of time in case prep in that caliber, so having fewer stations isn't an issue...it is the easiest to switch dies around on, so I can use it as a single stage or a turret when loading other calibers.

The Hornady and Lee are on Inline Fabrication Quick Change mounts, which means I can change them out for the other presses you can glimpse under plastic on the far left...single stage, case prep, dedicated priming
 
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Not really anything special.

I load a lot of 9mm for competition, training, and teaching and usually load in runs of 1k...so that's done on the Mark 7 Apex-10 on the left. I've just started loading .45ACP and have the Pro 6000 set up for it in the middle. On the left is my first press the Hornady LNL AP that I load my competition .38Spl on. I spend a lot of time in case prep in that caliber, so having fewer stations isn't an issue...it is the easiest to switch dies around on, so I can use it as a single stage or a turret when loading other calibers.

They are mounted on Inline Fabrication Quick Change mounts, which means I can change them out for the other presses you can glimpse under plastic on the far left...single stage, case prep, dedicated priming
I like it and really would like one press for one caliber. I just don't have the space to keep everything set up all the time. Besides, it takes me four weeks to shoot 1000 rounds of any one caliber.

And NO I'm not going to spend the dough for the in-line fab stuff as great as it is:)
 
I just don't have the space to keep everything set up all the time.
The bench, my three progressives are set up on, is only 4' x 1.5'

I'm not going to spend the dough for the in-line fab stuff as great as it is
I went that route mostly because I didn't want to apply of lot of pressure to the edge on my bench...well, that and I wanted the shell plates at eye level
 
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Not really anything special.

I load a lot of 9mm for competition, training, and teaching and usually load in runs of 1k...so that's done on the Mark 7 Apex-10 on the left. I've just started loading .45ACP and have the Pro 6000 set up for it in the middle. On the left is my first press the Hornady LNL AP that I load my competition .38Spl on. I spend a lot of time in case prep in that caliber, so having fewer stations isn't an issue...it is the easiest to switch dies around on, so I can use it as a single stage or a turret when loading other calibers.

They are mounted on Inline Fabrication Quick Change mounts, which means I can change them out for the other presses you can glimpse under plastic on the far left...single stage, case prep, dedicated priming
Nice pictorial and bench.

I have pretty much gone the one press/one caliber route too.
I buy any and all RCBS Piggy-Back presses I find at gun shows and Frankenstein them into a setup I have cobbled together.
The last one was bolted onto an Ammo-Master press base that I bought for $50...:what:
This is what I got:
AmasterS.jpg
That press would not index and I found it had a bent shell plate pivot bolt, an easy fix.
Sorry for the drift...
.
 
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What is the inside diameter of the case feeder adapter and tube holder adapter?

Checking to see if my existing lee tubes will work.
 
Nice write up.

You need a step ladder to add brass..... :what:
Had to smile at that one! I use to use 3' tubes too......my ceiling above my press is only 7' high though. so my upper support was a hole in the ceiling....that was the lateral support! But then jmorris demoed his kit-made 3D printer, and how it could make cheap electric collators. The rest is history.....

I bought one commercial one....the Hornady pistol bullet feeder, but it was so dang inefficient, that I had to spend a lot of time and effort just to make it empty faster.....still use it, but my other presses all have 3D printed ones, 4 so far, and they work better and are so stinking inexpensive. Just have to buy a printer....;) then it just keeps on giving.....I'll probably print one more.
 
What is the inside diameter of the case feeder adapter and tube holder adapter?

Checking to see if my existing lee tubes will work.
I haven't measured it, but I'll offer some circumstantial evidence .

1. The 3" tubes, I got them at PetSmart, you see in my picture worked with the Lee Universal Case feeder before I moved it onto Tube Adapter on this feeder
2. The video states that it "accepts four Lee Case Feeder tubes"
3. The video goes on to state that the adapter accepts tubes with an outer diameter of .565" or 14.35mm
 
Had to smile at that one! I use to use 3' tubes too......my ceiling above my press is only 7' high though.
I got lucky, the ceiling in my garage is 10' high...I have to keep a short ladder available to reach anything

The rest is history.....
It's going to happen soon. I even left some space behind the presses to mount the vertical supports. Trying to see if I can get one set of collators to use with both presses...Hornady and Lee...figure the Apex-10 is far enough removed that it will get it's own bullet collator
 
I haven't measured it, but I'll offer some circumstantial evidence .

1. The 3" tubes, I got them at PetSmart, you see in my picture worked with the Lee Universal Case feeder before I moved it onto Tube Adapter on this feeder
2. The video states that it "accepts four Lee Case Feeder tubes"
3. The video goes on to state that the adapter accepts tubes with an outer diameter of .565" or 14.35mm
Thanks I suspected they would work, started watching the video but had to stop, will finishing watching it later tonight.
 
Adding to 9mm's post, the Lee Tubes for the 4-way are 9/16" O.D.

The "Thinwall" aquarium tubing has been made in 1/16" increments with 1/32" walls. That meant that 5/8 slid over 9/16 over 1/2 over 7/16 over 3/8. Perfect telescoped one into the next size. Then that Lee company, (not Lee PRECISION) started buying their tubing from China, and metric sizes started creeping in. For now most still work ok except the new 5/8" is iffy. I've had to buy metric ones to compensate in the 5/8 size.

But that doesn't effect this project. Buy the shorter tubes from Lee Precision or the 36" tubes from the aquarium outlet in the 9/16" size....and it'll fit the 4 or 5-ways.
 
I got lucky, the ceiling in my garage is 10' high...I have to keep a short ladder available to reach anything


It's going to happen soon. I even left some space behind the presses to mount the vertical supports. Trying to see if I can get one set of collators to use with both presses...Hornady and Lee...figure the Apex-10 is far enough removed that it will get it's own bullet collator
You can call that lucky, but I'm getting too stinking old to be climbing around.....so I feel lucky not to have a tall ceiling.:)
I am doing some sharing between presses too.....that's the reason I asked my nephew to weld me a horizontal steel bar system to mount them.....don't know if I showed you that:
 
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Had to smile at that one! I use to use 3' tubes too......my ceiling above my press is only 7' high though. so my upper support was a hole in the ceiling....that was the lateral support! But then jmorris demoed his kit-made 3D printer, and how it could make cheap electric collators. The rest is history.....

I bought one commercial one....the Hornady pistol bullet feeder, but it was so dang inefficient, that I had to spend a lot of time and effort just to make it empty faster.....still use it, but my other presses all have 3D printed ones, 4 so far, and they work better and are so stinking inexpensive. Just have to buy a printer....;) then it just keeps on giving.....I'll probably print one more.
One of these days I will make the plunge. Right now I don't have any space to put one.
 
that's the reason I asked my nephew to weld me a horizontal steel bar system to mount them.....don't know if I showed you that:
Yes, I was immediately jealous.

The only person I know who welds is a friend's daughter. She only learned to do it because it was a requirement for her Major to teach Ag Studies...it isn't pretty
 
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