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Popularity of Remington 700?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by 3Crows, Jul 23, 2020.

  1. 3Crows

    3Crows Member

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    This is not to bash on Remington or their Model 700. I just want to understand why this particular rifle has such a following and particularly has such a deep aftermarket for parts, stocks, bits and pieces? Is it because the military used the action for some sniper rifles? They are nice rifles granted and attractive, but since around 1982 the bolt does not lock, they are not controlled feed (and neither of which is terribly important to me) and the Model 700 is not especially inexpensive, solid middle of the market pricing. What is it about the Model 700? Maybe I need to add one to my small selection? It seems to be the 1022 of bolt guns!
     
  2. mcb

    mcb Member

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    Oh boy this should be good...

    The 700 action is remarkably strong for a bolt gun. The push feed system, with a bolt that encloses the case-head and then the bolt inserts into a recess in the barrel inside the receiver makes for a very strong lock up. The three rings of steel advertising moniker has some truth to it. The round receiver is very symmetric in its lockup this has some accuracy advantages. The round receiver also made them a bit easier to manufacture.

    These factor combine to make an affordable and very serviceable rifle. It got enough market acceptance to become the basis for a lot of other people's derivatives. You can now build a 700 and never touch a Remington part if you want.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2020
  3. Legionnaire
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    Legionnaire Member

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    It has been around a long time. It set a standard early as a solid hunting rifle capable of good out-of-the box accuracy, and surged in popularity with the introduction of the 7mm Remington Magnum cartridge in the early 1960s. It has been around long enough now that, as you point out, it has lots of aftermarket support. The basic action is a proven design; many custom actions are built on the same footprint. Take a look at Bergara's Premier series. The action is basically an upgraded Remington 700. So you have a classic (you can find excellent condition early models that shoot very well) with staying power (lots of custom guns are built on trued 700 actions).

    I am sorry for Remington's corporate problems. They have also made many stupid market decisions over the years (should have offered faster-twist barrels for a number of cartridges, for example). They had issues with some triggers. But the basic 700 action just plain works. And it's hard to argue the appeal of a 1970s era walnut stocked BDL.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2020
  4. tarosean

    tarosean Member

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    They have been around since the early 60's,I believe its the simplicity of the design. Much like the 10/22, Glocks, 1911's that can all be build from 100% aftermarket parts.

    I own 3, 2 shoot sub MOA while the other is more like MOB (barn).. Its a mas produced production gun, hitting the "lotto" is the key takeaway as with any mass produced gun.
     
  5. Bayou52

    Bayou52 Member

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    I can't speak of the newer 700s as the youngest one I have is a 1974 700 vintage in 30-06. I also have what looks like its twin - a 1966 vintage 700 in 270. Both are fantastic shooters and make nice single ragged holes @ 100 yards with handloads.

    Pics:

    IMG-20170909-082252.jpg

    IMG-20170909-082010.jpg

    Bayou52
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2020
  6. 23tony

    23tony Member

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    As I understand it, what is commonly sold as a 700 isn't the original 700, but a cheaper version of it (and actually has a different model number, something like "770" IIRC). The actual 700 is still available but you have to watch out for what you're getting, and the "real" thing, obviously, costs more.

    I can't say for sure that's accurate, but that's what I picked up a few years back when I was looking at getting one. I ended up with a Ruger American instead, because it hit the price range of the faux-700's with the accuracy of the "real" ones, and that's what I had available at the time.
     
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  7. George P

    George P Member

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    My 700BDL in 7mag from 1980 still shoots 3/4" 3 shot groups from a rest at 100 yards - and that was done about a month ago with handloads from 1990. My Model 7 in 7-08 from the early 90s, with its light and short barrel, still does 1" or less in the same scenario. I like them.
     
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  8. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

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    It's cheaper.
     
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  9. Legionnaire
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    Legionnaire Member

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    The current 700 is still a 700. The 770 (originally the 710) is/was indeed a cheaper lookalike targeted at the first time owner and occasional shooter. I date myself, but I think of the 710 as Remington's version of IBM's PC Junior ... one of Remington's many marketing blunders.
     
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  10. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    Over a two or three year period around 2005, I bought two Remington 700's (221 Rem Fireball, 17 Remington) and a Remington XR-100 (223 Remington) (basically a single shot version of the 700). All three had so-so accuracy out of the box.

    All three got some work on the stock and replacement triggers. All three are now sub 3/4" group accuracy.

    I bought the Remingtons based on their reputation but these three certainly did not live up to all the hype.

    I do still have the rifles.
     
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  11. Chuck R.

    Chuck R. Member

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    I've owned 5 or 6 over the years and still have 2.

    All the ones I've owned apparently lived up to the "hype" as they were reliable and reasonably accurate for a factory mass produced gun. I handloaded for all of mine and I never had one that I couldn't get to just about MOA or under for 3 rds, which IMHO is perfectly acceptable for a hunting rifle at normal distances encountered. I also have several friends with REM 700s with the same experience. As a matter of fact 5 of us are getting together SAT for a .223 shoot at my place on steel out to 600yds and 4 or the 5 rifles will be 700s.

    As guys have pointed out, the aftermarket support is fantastic, I don't think there's a stockmaker that doesn't inlet for a 700.
     
  12. 3Crows

    3Crows Member

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    Thanks all, very good information each. Please continue, perhaps this can be educational, at least for me! Like I said, I am not interested in bashing the 700 or Remington, just interested in learning about the Model 700, anything and all. I am odd, I would rather purchase an inexpensive or moderately priced gun and then modify it to cost more than the expensive gun I could have bought for the same money. But see, buying an expensive gun that shoots great is not nearly as much fun as spending more (time and money) on lesser so that the lesser is now more, in all ways! Thanks again.
     
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  13. Legionnaire
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    Legionnaire Member

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    @3Crows, if you really want to dig deep, Brownell's has a series entitled "How to Build Your Own Remington 700." It's good, educational reading. That one can build a Remington 700 adds to its popularity among garage gunsmiths.
     
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  14. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    A 700 made today is the same rifle today as the originals made in 1962. And other than some very minor differences pretty much the same as the 721 and 722 made since the end of WW-2. The 710 and 770 are completely different rifles.

    Timing was everything. The 721 and 722 were decent, if not utilitarian rifles introduced in the 1940's designed with a lot of cheaper stamped parts and cost cutting production methods. At the time the Winchester 70 was considered a much better rifle.

    In 1962 Remington dressed up the 721 and 722 calling it the 700 which made it a lot more appealing. Then in 1964 Winchester really cheapened the model 70. Shooters quickly moved to the 700.

    Shortest correct answer. Compared to other rifles in the 1960's and 70's it was the cheapest option for a decent rifle. And they did prove to be quite accurate, if not somewhat less dependable.

    A lot of people complain about some of the newer budget rifle's aesthetics, but admit they shoot well. Remington started the trend. No rifle in history has cut more corners in how they were produced than the 700 series. Instead of a machined action they are basically made from round stock with very little machining. Instead of a recoil lug machined into the action they use a round washer that slides on between the barrel and action. The extractors are made from a stamped piece of sheet metal and the bolt handles are brazed on.

    All of those shortcuts means a cheaper to produce rifle. All of those design features do at times lead to issues, but as long as everything is assembled right they can produce a very accurate rifle, at budget prices. No different than today's Ruger Predator or one of the many other modern budget guns. In fact most of the newer guns address many of the 700's shortcomings such as better extractors, a better bedding system, better bolt handle attachment, etc.
     
  15. marksman13

    marksman13 Member

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    Younger shooters don’t know and many older shooters have forgotten that the 700 built its reputation before there was such an animal as a Savage Axis or a Ruger American. Back when I bought my 700 ADL, there wasn’t really a cheaper option other than milsurps. Heck, I’d still buy a 700 ADL 100 times out of 100 of my other option was a Ruger American or Savage Axis.
     
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  16. .455_Hunter

    .455_Hunter Member

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    I have a couple of 80's and 90's 700 lefties in .338 and .30-06. They are top quality guns, with one serving as my current primary elk rifle and the other as essentially a SHTF duty gun.
     
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  17. George P

    George P Member

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    And the main reason I bought a 7mag - I am LH and back in 1980, there weren't too many choices of makers or even cartridges to choose from. Browning was the other major player for LH folks and the 700 was readily available and cost less.
     
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  18. 23tony

    23tony Member

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    It's been about 5 years, but when I was shopping, I found "Remington 700s" advertised on sale at one box store (since closed) for ~$350-400, and when I went to check them out, found out they were actually 770's. The gun counter guy swore that it REALLY WAS a 700, then when I came back the next day to buy it, he told me that there was no way a real 700 would sell for that price.

    Maybe it was just a bad experience with that one chain, but it certainly made me a lot more cautious when I'm shopping. Maybe that's why that particular store is closed. I guess I may be extrapolating too much from one experience, so take it fwiw...
     
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  19. TEKoken813

    TEKoken813 Member

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    Mine is about fairly new & I love it. Lots of fun to shoot. I did put a TriggerTech trigger in it.

    IMG_9437.jpg
     
  20. mcb

    mcb Member

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    You can get a Remington 700 ADL with scope from Walmart for under $400, sometimes cheaper if they are running a sale on a particular model/caliber.

    The funny thing is the cheapest 700 ADL Long Action (typically <$400) uses the same receiver as the Remington Defense M2010 sniper rifle that cost a bit over $11,000 (it comes with a scope too). Other than finish/coatings there is basically no difference between the M2010 and the ADL Magnum long action receiver.

    ETA: And due to the ADL all 700's have a little lump in the back of the magazine opening with a threaded hole in it. This is where the front screw of the ADL trigger guard attaches and all other models of 700 do not use it but they still have that threaded hole and protrusion into the magazine well. The other threaded hole at an angle is for the ADL magazine box again a feature only used in the ADL but all 700's have it. Rather silly IMHO.

    image-jpg.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2020
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  21. 23tony

    23tony Member

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    Interesting. Thanks for the info. That's why I joined up here!
     
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  22. marksman13

    marksman13 Member

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    I’d say that’s pretty typical of gun counter workers at big box stores. I’m not saying there aren’t exceptions, but this story does not surprise me in the least. He was wrong.
     
  23. LoonWulf
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    LoonWulf Contributing Member

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    I've seen enough bad ones in the last 10 years or so I'm leery of the 700s. I haven't seen a BAD Axis or American yet. I still like 700s and own 2, soon to be 3 (next paragraph will explain that one), but I suggest anyone looking to buy one look over THAT specific rifle carefully before purchasing it.

    Speaking of.......I got a 700p .308 barreled receiver coming, along with a Christensen Carbon barrel in 6.5CM. Gonna use either a H&S, or B&C take off stock to build it out.

    got zero gunsmith/machinest training, and no major tooling, and from a 700 can still build a fairly reasonable rifle.
    They are the glue together models of the firearms industry, where as ARs are kinda like leggos.
     
  24. 3Crows

    3Crows Member

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    Yes, as the owner now of two Axis II rifles I would probably take that bet on them being able to go toe to toe with about anything at quadruple their retail price. But, that is another subject and off this subject so forgive me. I am interested in the Model 700 due to the deep aftermarket which is almost unique in the bolt gun class. I could pick up a stainless ADL and rebarrel and restock it to achieve a light weight carry rifle (aka mountain rifle or whatever we call them these days) that would be fairly unique and at somewhat modest investment. Maybe as a winter project rifle. Or shoot as is if I found it in a caliber I would enjoy, I know the cheap synthetic stocks cause some to break out in hives but I am not allergic to penicillin or plastic.
     
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  25. marksman13

    marksman13 Member

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    I own a Ruger American in 223 that is the worst shooting rifle I have ever owned in my life and I’ve had a bunch of rifles pass through my hands. I realize that is a sample size of one, but I won’t buy another one. Good friend of mine bought a Savage Axis and it is in the running for worst shooter with my American.
     
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