Refinish or touchup Model 70 stock project?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by Wreck-n-Crew, Feb 27, 2017.

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  1. Wreck-n-Crew

    Wreck-n-Crew Member

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    Opinions needed. I've finished a stock that was virgin wood but never re-finished a stock. I have an oak table and it came out well with stain and clear.

    I have a Project I'm starting to Bed and free float (if need be) a Model 70 Walnut stock. I figured the stock needs touched up or refinished. Is there an easy way to touch this stock up and make it look decent by touching it up and if so what are those options? If not and a refinish is the best route would you recommend using True Oil, Linseed Oil (longer process), Just clear it or a light stain and clear with polyurethane?

    As far as finish I don't care if it's high gloss or semi-gloss shine I just want a decent finish before I Bed the stock.
     
  2. Wreck-n-Crew

    Wreck-n-Crew Member

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    pics
     

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  3. JeffG

    JeffG Member

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    Try touch up first, if you don't like it, strip it and start over. It looks like polyurethane finish. Try Watco wipe on poly. It's a damp rag type of a situation. Wipe on thin coats of finish, work the checkering with a toothbrush. If it doesn't work, Watco is a great, durable finish for your strip and finish. Let us know how it turns out....
    https://www.menards.com/main/paint/interior-paint-stain/polyurethane-clear-protective-finishes/oil-based-polyurethane/watco-satin-wipe-on-poly-finish-1-qt/p-1444453040918-c-7966.htm?tid=6930200598410747310
     
  4. Wreck-n-Crew

    Wreck-n-Crew Member

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    I thought it was an older stock and they may have used polyurethane. Looks to be pre1992 with full gloss. Seems they went to Semi-gloss in 1992 forward as well as laminate stocks. The grain looks good and the color is nice.
     
  5. JeffG

    JeffG Member

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    I've had good luck with Watco and a rag. Most of the handling marks will blend in pretty well. You can pick your gloss level.
     
  6. Wreck-n-Crew

    Wreck-n-Crew Member

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    I think ill give it a try. Ill update when its done. I appreciate it, thanks.
    A side pic...forgot it too.
     

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  7. Wreck-n-Crew

    Wreck-n-Crew Member

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    I realized I need to do the whole thing now. But I also realized I want a satin or light coat finish and I am wondering if Tru-Oil or Linseed Oil would be the best bet. The color of the walnut is amazing. After sanding I wiped off the dust with a lightly dampened rag and I about fell over. Just really the look I want.

    This is the limit of shine I want (not my stock) . guess it's time to go hunting down the finish I need and get to work.
     
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  8. JeffG

    JeffG Member

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    Ok, here is a Tikka that I stripped from a urethane finish, lightly stained and used only Watco(not poly). I just took these photos under very bright fluorescent lights to show the satin effect. I used Citri Strip to get the original finish off.
    The finish is very field worthy, and is easily re-polished with a rag and a little Watco. Unless you have experience with linseed oil, you might want to stay away from that. The gumming and darkening tendencies are sometimes not what you might like.
    Having said that, Watco is a linseed oil base with formulated drying agents, that is very easy to use. Tru Oil tends to be pretty glossy.

    . IMG_2283.JPG IMG_2284.JPG IMG_2285.JPG [​IMG]
     

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  9. Wreck-n-Crew

    Wreck-n-Crew Member

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    That's a beauty! I Fine job. If this turns out half as good id be happy.

    I ended up with some satin But they did not have any Watco so I got poly. Got a coat on but I believe I will have to wait until tomorrow to get another coat on. We will see what tomorrow brings. just glad I got the time to do anything. If it don't turn out i'll strip it and go find some at Lowe's.
     
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  10. JeffG

    JeffG Member

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    Go slow, be patient. Listen to country music. ;) Rub down your last coat with OOOO steel wool. Make sure you de-lint and dust every crevice. Use a fresh rags piece for each coat. Work a tiny bit into the checkering with a clean toothbrush. Take some pics for us. :thumbup:
     
  11. Wreck-n-Crew

    Wreck-n-Crew Member

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    First coat a little shiny...but looks decent. Hope i git the right stuff!
     

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  12. Wreck-n-Crew

    Wreck-n-Crew Member

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    I've got some 0000 steel wool ready to go.
     
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  13. JeffG

    JeffG Member

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    Looks great! Poly is going to be super durable by the way...
     
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  14. Wreck-n-Crew

    Wreck-n-Crew Member

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    Thanks we'll see what the Steel wool does when I get it done. Then on to bedding and a sling.
     
  15. JeffG

    JeffG Member

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    If it dulls it too much, wipe a super this coat and leave it. Like you were polishing a table with lemon oil.
     
  16. RugerBassMan

    RugerBassMan Member

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    I would not finish the stock before bedding it - a messy procedure with overflowing bedding compound or epoxy.

    My simple procedure is to sand the stock with a orbital sander with 100 grit. This makes the flat surfaces real flat and the edges real sharp but be real careful as these sanders are a real handful and can wreak sharp edges, checkering or remove an excessive amount of wood. Stay away from critical areas. I then hand sand everything down with 150 grit, then 200 or whatever, then 320. I then apply my stock finish or choice - MINWAX Wipe-On Poly, keep the poly stuff out of the checkering, the first coat takes about 6-10 hours to dry and cure, then sand with 320, when the Poly has cured the odor is distinctive. On open grained wood such as black walnut, 8-10 coats are required, rub each coat real hard in small areas until squeaky. Sand lightly with 320. At the end sand with 400. Final coat goes on over un-sanded. Sand out any lumps or runs or missed spots having tool marks. Finally, brush in one coat to seal checkering that has had old finish removed by paint remover.

    I don't like steel wool - to me it is more of a cleaning scrubbing thing and I go for a clean, extremely flat surface with no pores showing and a deep finish that can be looked into. Adequate rubbing between coats removes the glossy effect. I use the "clear satin" variety of the Poly Rub.
     
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  17. JeffG

    JeffG Member

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    We all have our methods of stock finishing. I am a hand finish guy. I would never advise someone to go at a stock with an orbital sander; things could get out of control and unwanted results could appear very quickly. Wipe on poly is a great innovation, and has brought about some beautiful finishes.
     
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  18. Wreck-n-Crew

    Wreck-n-Crew Member

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    Well i made two mistakes. One the poly i got is a five day cure! Who ever heard if such! Anyhow it was not what i wanted. Going to have to make a trip to lowes.

    Second mistake was the stock was not a 2 piece and even if it had been i realized the adapter i orderd would not work. So i had to make one.

    I went by the recycling place that sells aluminum stick, bar stock, sheet metal, etc and picked up a piece of 1/4" of aluminum and headed to the shop. Hand work it is. I had a grinder, cut of saw etc but ni band saw. Took a while to shape it up.

    Had to overlap and grind and offset so tye screw would go through both the trigger guard and the plate. I also had to counter bore the front screw in order to get it to start and tighten up.

    I also discovered i may have to do a litte work to free float. I have clearance all the way down to about 4" before receiver. Not a big deal. Should be easy.

    I want to use striper to remove the crap poly i put on. But ill wait until free float and bedding is done. Got a batch of devcon...that should do well.
     

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  19. JeffG

    JeffG Member

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    Five days, no I never heard of that one. Now you know why gunsmiths are grouchy. Keep plugging. Stuff happens...:thumbdown:
     
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  20. Wreck-n-Crew

    Wreck-n-Crew Member

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    LOL...Right. 5 days for full cure! Thats what I get for not taking the road I know, you know I thought I would have learned that the first hundred times in my life! :oops:

    At least a Gun Smith actually does it for a living and they have more tools, training, etc. lol...Oh well. I'm going to make it look good so a do over is warranted.
     
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  21. Wreck-n-Crew

    Wreck-n-Crew Member

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    That stuff finally hardened up today. So today I got put on a new recoil pad since I had to strip the stock anyway and sanding was doable. I figured why not do everything since the old pad that came with it was a little rough. The Stock had the curve so I had to get it nice and flat to get them to mate up. Had to take a little off the stock to get that good finish around the edges. Made sure the barrel was free floating.

    Next I got the Dremel out and prepped the stock for bedding. I left ledges for the bedding as a stop. Removed the trigger and the bolt release. Got the modeling clay and filled where needed in case of overflow. Used some KIWI neutral ( natural clear) shoe polish as a release agent and went over everything real good. Mixed the Devcon (barely made enough.) and bedded it down for the night. ;)

    If I get the time tomorrow ill go over the stock again and make sure it's wiped down with mineral spirits and touch up any spots from bedding with the Dremel if need be. Not sure I will have time for more. Hopefully I have here done by this weekend or at least Monday.
     
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  22. Wreck-n-Crew

    Wreck-n-Crew Member

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    You know i realizes i have some Watco teak oil. Wonder if it would give a good look?Good thing about teak oil is you can go right over it with polyurethane after 72 hours.
     
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  23. JeffG

    JeffG Member

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    It might be worth a try. Make sure you let us know...pictures too. :thumbup:
     
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  24. RugerBassMan

    RugerBassMan Member

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    Get a piece of scrap wood and develop your orbital sanding skills. Paint remover with a tooth brush works great on checkering. The Gun-Line multi washer barrel channel scraper is a fast effective way to open up barrel channels. I have seen more damage done with a Dremel applied to the insides of a stock than an orbital sander loaded with 100 grit on the outside - as mentioned stay away from checkering and don't wipe out those nice sharp edges or mess up curves. Any tool can be improperly used including scalpels used in surgery - risk is present in any event.

    The longest time I have ever waited for that first coat of Poly Wipe to cure enough for sanding is 8 hours and if the surface is less open the cure time will be less. Wiping down the outside of the freshly sanded wood with 91 per cent Isopropyl alcohol raises the grain for subsequent sandings and cleans dirt and grease from surfaces.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2017
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  25. LoonWulf
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    LoonWulf Contributing Member

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    Stock project looks good, i like the bottom plate that was very well done.

    If your looking for a durable gloss finish, west systems 105 plus 207 hardener produces a really solid finish that's fairly easy to apply and work with. I prefer it to the polys for atleast the initial coats.
     
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