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Shooting Glock to the left

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by wanderinwalker, Mar 30, 2014.

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  1. wanderinwalker

    wanderinwalker Member

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    Good afternoon all,

    I just thought I'd share this little observation from today's range trip. Hopefully it will help somebody out, as it sure opened my eyes. Sorry if this goes a bit long.

    Let's start: I've had a Glock 17 for a very long time (in my frame of reference) now. Can't say I love the thing, it's an inanimate object, but I do like it quite a bit as a shooting machine. Goes BANG, holds lots of rounds, is pretty easy to shoot, low maintenance and all of that.

    BUT! Every once in a while it crops up that I shoot the thing to the left. Oddly not usually while in a one-handed Bullseye type hold, rather mostly when taking a typical modern two-handed grip. Many, many right handed shooters shoot Glocks to the left. A quick Google search will reveal this, and it seems there are many different suggestions of what to do to "fix" the problem. Usually the suggestion is to vary how much finger the shooter is putting through the trigger guard, typically suggesting to make sure to use just the tip of the trigger finger, or just drift the sights if it's consistent. This morning though I found a post at Brian Enos forums (sorry, didn't bookmark it) that suggested all you have to do to correct "Glock left" is to make sure you're focusing on squeezing the trigger straight back at a steady pressure.

    Hmmmm.... that made a lot of sense. A little dry-fire against a blank wall and I'm starting to see how it's easy to curl the trigger-finger and pull the front sight in the wrong (left) direction. So I loaded up 50 rounds, formulated a plan and hit the range for some live fire.

    First target goes up at about 9 yards. I decided to use a plain piece of 8.5x11" paper. Five rounds in a magazine, I settle into a modified Isosceles stance and take aim. Squeeze the trigger, focus, straight back, BANG! First shot lands dead center. Ah. Now, for shot number two I try jamming my finger as far into the trigger guard as I reach. I end up with the trigger somewhere between the first and second knuckle. Again, I focus on just squeezing the trigger straight back. And another round goes close to center. (Pause for short giggle, I think I'm onto something.) Repeat three more times, varying how much finger is on the trigger and watch all 5 shots cluster pretty closely, in the center. AH-HA!

    Magazine two is another five rounds. This time I vary my grip on the pistol with how far my hand is wrapped around it and where the tang is hitting the web of my shooting hand. Again, as long as I can get my finger on the trigger in a position to drive it straight back and not apply force off-axis, the shots go to center.

    The remainder of the session was practicing placing the first round from the holster and the first round from a reload to the center. I lost focus a couple of times and overdrove the trigger squeeze, resulting in the predictable left-hits. But when I focused on "trigger straight back" the rounds went back to the middle.

    So maybe that's it. If your Glock is shooting to the left, focus hard on how you're squeezing the trigger. Be very deliberate to make sure the movement is straight to the rear through the middle line of the trigger. You may think you're squeezing the trigger carefully and not disturbing the sights, but you may in fact be applying the force at an angle to the center line. I know I for sure thought there was nothing wrong with my trigger control; I shoot DA revolver regularly and while I'm not even close to the skill of a good wheelgunner like our MrBorland , most people think I'm competent with a S&W. Yet targets never lie. Watch your trigger control and perhaps your Glocks will stop shooting left too. :cool:

    Thanks to anybody who read this far, and I hope this helps somebody out.
     
  2. Wreck-n-Crew
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    Wreck-n-Crew Member

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    Funny how I had a discussion on what is more correct: Did LE who had to learn to shoot Glocks have to do so because they did not know how to trigger a gun or did they have to learn a new way to make the lighter pistol shoot accurately.

    I myself have been through it. I can not only shoot my 5906 faster and with more accuracy than My G19 or G22. Though the G22 is naturally more accurate for me than the 19. I won't buy the bull that "I was doing it wrong and that is why the transition was not smooth" , but I do buy that I have to adapt and improve control to make it work. Went through the same thing with a few others as well, not just the Glock. Also had a P89 and P90. Both more naturally easy to shoot fast and accurate.

    The faster speed I attribute to recoil because of the weight, easier to steady, and more forgiving trigger that is not only different, but more forgiving due to weight.

    I did a little test of my own to confirm the movement was more with a lighter gun using a laser. You can see it move. Practicing with the laser made the other polymer gun I had at the time made me improve to an acceptable degree to cut down on movement.

    I now suffer from an injury that makes it hard for me to be steady at all some days. Damages nerves, Disc and muscle spasms make me look worse than if I were healthy. Also My trigger finger has been through so many injuries it is stiff and doesn't move well. It has been broke and cut several times and the trigger plus middle finger on the shooting hand is larger than those on my left hand permanently from those years of abuse. I am no crack shot but my steady vs. unsteady days vary from nice to pure green by looking at my targets. If I am physically good that day and have an off day of shooting, they still look much better than a physically bad day. For a visual example (Insert a little imagination) on a physically bad day I have had some shots completely miss the paper, With the majority being spread out around the bulls eye in a 10" circle and shooting 50 rounds, there might be 8 or 10 in a tight group. On a good day, not being physically affected I have dropped 35-40 in a 2.5" group from center, cutting a nice hole in the paper with the others being close by (within 4") and maybe a stray or two. Pretty much night and day.
     
  3. bds
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    bds Member

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    When someone complains their Glock shot groups are flying around the target, I have them dry fire while watching the front sight. They are often surprised to see the front sight move or jump when the striker is released.

    I then have them go through the basics of grip/relaxed trigger hand/smooth "pressing" of trigger until the front sight doesn't move. When the live fire shot groups are consistent to POA, I tell them there was nothing wrong with their Glocks. ;)

    If you are looking to buy a Glock, dry fire several times while watching the front sight and buy the one that doesn't move. Why? You'll spend a lot less in ammunition getting familiar with the new Glock and get a better shooting Glock from day one (unless you plan on doing a trigger job/trigger swap).

    YMMV

    Enjoy and have fun with your Glocks. :D
     
  4. jigglyjames29

    jigglyjames29 Member

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    Quite a few Glocks shoot to the left though.
    I've had quite a few that were spot on, but my G42 (and some other people's from what I've been reading) don't.

    I've tried other shooters, more and less trigger finger, adjusting grip, shooting weak handed, from a rest, etc.

    It shoots a bit left.
     
  5. TAKtical

    TAKtical Member

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    Ive shot almost every glock out there and I can tell you from experience that the chances of finding two that have the same poi vs poa is RARE. Im not sure why or how that happens. My beloved 17 would shoot 6-8 inches high at 25yds. Had a 19 that would shoot 6 inches low at 25yds. Had a glock 36 that would shoot low left about 4 inches at 25yds. I'll never understand it, I just work around it. Meprolight adjustable night sights have worked great for me. The 17 had the slide milled for an RMR and that is working great as well.
     
  6. Tommygunn

    Tommygunn Member

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    Match your shooting to this chart:
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2014
  7. Greg528iT

    Greg528iT Member

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    The few times I've shot a Glock, I've shot it low left.. finger tightening exactly as the listed chart shows.. I press and press and press on the trigger and it becomes finger tightening as the long throw messes me up. I'm sure I'd get use to it if I shot it more.. just keep practicing.. dry fires etc
     
  8. ritepath

    ritepath Member

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    I have a tendency to shoot everything I own from slightly left to 4" left, especially if I don't pay attention or shoot "drills" quickly. One thing I find funny is if I pull the trigger somewhat quick I get better accuracy.

    I kind of wonder if it's me being left handed but shooting right handed.
     
  9. hammerklavier

    hammerklavier Member

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    This is generally caused by 'milking' the grip. Take a very firm grip on the gun to prevent this. Eventually you'll be able to loosen up a little when you learn not to do it anymore. @OP: I think by concentrating on your trigger finger, you inadvertently stopped your other fingers from pulling the gun left.
     
  10. EdLaver

    EdLaver Member

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    I did shoot my Glocks left, but after adapting and getting a few mods, I dont have that problem anymore. I got the grips fully stippled, 3.5 connector, and Glocksmith match grade slide locks. Now my G19, G22, and G20 all shoot dead on.
     
  11. wanderinwalker

    wanderinwalker Member

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    Very much doubt I was milking the grip. I'm used to shooting DA revolvers in double action 99% of the time and don't generally suffer from shooting to the left with my S&Ws. If anything if I was having a bad day with the Glock, jumping to my 586 or M-19 put me right back to shooting like I have a clue.

    Exactly why my AR-15 Service Rifle weighs about 13 pounds. Much easier to shoot offhand with a nicely weighed rifle, plus the heavier firearm is less likely to be pulled off hold by getting a little aggressive on the trigger.

    Looking at the Glock 17 tonight, I notice the trigger face is rounded instead of flat like most every other handgun trigger I have. This may be part of why it's so easy to misdirect the force against the trigger; it feels like you're on the flat and squeezing straight back but you're actually somewhere on the side of the lever. Combine with a lightweight gun that isn't resistant to being forced off axis and there goes the muzzle when the trigger breaks.

    And FWIW, "THE CHART" applies to using a one-handed Bullseye hold, not a two-handed hold. Because according to The Chart when I stuffed my trigger finger far enough in to squeeze the trigger between with the middle pad of my finger, the rounds should have been off to the right. But when I focused on pressing the trigger straight back, they went to center. Like I wrote, focusing on applying the pressure through the trigger-safety lever brought the bullet impacts to the center of the target. And I do mean FOCUSING the pressure on that point, trying to drive the trigger with just the trigger-safety and then through the slot in the trigger face.

    Try it sometime with a misbehaving Glock and see what happens. I could be completely wrong, but if it isn't shooting to the middle, what do you have to lose anyway?
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2014
  12. wlkjr

    wlkjr Member

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    If I pull the trigger halfway back till it hits that tight spot and then squeeze, all my shots pretty much stay centered. If I just shoot fast all are low left. Canting the front sight slightly left about 11 o'clock also helps and is a bit more comfortable, if I can remember it.
     
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