Quantcast

Sighting 30-06 4" high at 100 or 320 yard zero for deer

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Stevel, Nov 3, 2019.

  1. Stevel

    Stevel Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    Messages:
    220
    Location:
    SE PA
    I was wondering if anyone sights in high for deer. With my load 4" at 100, it has maximum rise of 5.7" at 190 and zero's just shy of 320 yards.

    The theory is you can aim at the heart for shots out to 320 yards and place it in the vitals. Similar to Maximum Point Blank Range, but allowing greater distance with dead on hold with smaller vital zone variance.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2019
  2. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2018
    Messages:
    4,985
    Location:
    Up State New York
    I like 1.5 to 2'' high for a deer rifle.
     
    chez323, mljdeckard, hps1 and 5 others like this.
  3. mustanger98

    mustanger98 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2004
    Messages:
    3,792
    Location:
    GA, CSA
    ~+2"@100yds is an approximate 200yd zero. +4"@100yds sounds about right for 300-325yds.

    I've also heard it stated as a 50/200yd zero vs a 25/250 or 25/300 zero.

    Which cartridge are we talking? My .243 is dead-on at 50yds to be a couple of inches high at 100yds. In my part of the country, mostly, 200yds is considered a long shot.
     
    Stevel and Bfh_auto like this.
  4. Jack Ryan

    Jack Ryan Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2019
    Messages:
    367
    Location:
    Indiana
    Have you shot it at those distances to KNOW that?

    No, I do not deliberately set my cross hairs high based on some theoretical calculation I've never test to try for the first time ever on a deer in the field.
     
  5. LoonWulf
    • Contributing Member

    LoonWulf Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    9,101
    Location:
    Hawaii
    I agree one should know where bullets will land at any distance they expect to make a shot, but unless he's shooting a wierd handload, those numbers should be pretty close.
    Personally for scopes that don't have secondary aiming points, and I won't be dialing, I use 3" high zero.
    I'm actually much more comfortable with that when I don't have a range finder.
    I also don't care for more than 3-4" in divergence from los, so that reduces my mpbr a bit.
     
    <*(((><, LNF150, .308 Norma and 3 others like this.
  6. skeeterfogger

    skeeterfogger Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2019
    Messages:
    623
  7. Bfh_auto

    Bfh_auto Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2016
    Messages:
    2,497
    If you're 4" high at 100 and hold center shoulder, you only have approximately 2" error for a good shot.
    I use a 200 yard zero. That gives me no holdover to 250. At 300 I hold just inside the hairline.
    My opinion is; If it's close, I want to be able to pull up and shoot offhand with as much room for error as possible.
    As the range gets longer, either I have time to calculate, or I pass on the shot.
    I used to know people who used that zero and they missed a lot of deer.
     
    Dibbs and Peakbagger46 like this.
  8. skeeterfogger

    skeeterfogger Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2019
    Messages:
    623
    4" high at 100 yards shooting a 150-165gr bullet, 59f, 1000ft altitude at 12x works out to first mil dot for POA at 300 yards.
     
  9. Chuck R.

    Chuck R. Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Messages:
    2,410
    Location:
    Leavenworth, KS
    I zero for 200, since the majority of the animals I've taken are under that distance, even here in KS.

    With a standard Leupold duplex the lower transition point between the heavy and thin lines is just about a perfect 300 yard aim-point. For a couple rifles that I set up for potentially longer shots I've gone to CDS turrets and BDC reticles.
     
    Bfh_auto likes this.
  10. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2007
    Messages:
    12,539
    Location:
    Georgia
    I zero all of my rifles for 100 yards. That way the bullet will never be more than 1" above, or below line of sight between the muzzle and about 130-150 yards depending on the cartridge, bullet and load. No more than 2-3" low at 200 yards, and I can still hit any big game animal in the kill zone at 300 yards without holding over. If I estimate the animal to be over 200 yards, but under 300 I can simply hold on the top of the back. Even in the wide open west most shots are under 200 yards and it is a lot easier to hold over at long range than to remember to hold low at closer ranges.

    Zeroing several inches high at 100 yards adds very little to the maximum effective range, but having bullets 4-6" high at closer ranges increases the odds of the bullet striking unseen brush between me and the animal. Many of my shots are in thick brush where I have a softball size opening to place the bullet through. I'd much rather have the laser flat trajectory for the 1st 200 yards (where I'm most likely to shoot) than add only 20-30 yards to the effective range (where I'm highly unlikely to get a shot).

    Most of my scopes have multiple aiming points anyway. They are designed to be used with a 100 yard zero with aiming points for 200,300,400, and 500 yards. Out to 300 yards it isn't hard to make hits with most any modern cartridge with pointed bullets. Beyond 300 yards bullet drop is enough with even the flattest shooting loads that you really need a range finder and either multiple aiming points or a scope with turrets.
     
    Dibbs, d2wing, Loyalist Dave and 2 others like this.
  11. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    4,942
    Location:
    Fl panhandle
    I keep it "simple". Some type of ballistic reticle on a scope, zero at 100 yards, confirm to maximum range I am comfortable with for that rifle with live fire on 8" steel plates.
     
    horsey300, Bfh_auto and Jack Ryan like this.
  12. rdnktrkr

    rdnktrkr Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2014
    Messages:
    443
    Location:
    Atlanta GA
    With my 30-06 I like to sight in at 200yrds, then I am 2" high at 100yrds and 3" low at 300yrds using 3" steel targets. Most of my shots in North Georgia are less than 100yrds and the longer range is for coyotes.
     
  13. Jack Ryan

    Jack Ryan Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2019
    Messages:
    367
    Location:
    Indiana
    Pretty close is for people who hunt pie plates and like to blood trail stuff
     
    d2wing, Varminterror and Bfh_auto like this.
  14. IdaD

    IdaD Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2018
    Messages:
    353
    Location:
    Idaho
    I have my 30-06 zeroed at 200 yards and that's about ideal for my purposes. The deer I got a couple of weeks ago was shot at 225 yards, and that's a little longer than my average shot but not by a whole lot. Zeroing at 200 seems to work out pretty well on this cartridge in terms of not printing too high along the way while still maintaining a reasonable drop at longer distances. I carry around a rangefinder when I hunt and it's actually pretty handy to have. Sometimes it can be hard to eyeball distances, especially over open draws.
     
    Loyalist Dave and horsey300 like this.
  15. Captcurt

    Captcurt Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2010
    Messages:
    2,884
    Location:
    Ozark Mountains of Arkansas
    Back in the day when I hunted out west I sighted my 270 with 130 gr like my idol, Uncle Jack O'Connor, suggested. He and Bob Hagel touted a sight-in 3" high at 100 yards. Many calibers like 243, 270, 30-06 7mm Mag and even 300 Mag all benefited with this sight-in. You would be 3" high at 100 yds, 4" at 200, dead on at 250-275, and 12-14" low at 400. This was with medium weight bullets for each caliber. Your dead-on hold was approx. 350 yards. I have used it to take deer and pronghorns from 25 yds to over 400. I played with a 257 Weatherby with this sight-in and found it to be only about 7" low at 400. What's not to like?

    Now my long range rifle wears a Vortex. My load matches their BDC. If I have a rangefinder I can keep rounds in a 6" plate out to 500 yards, but all of my other rifles are on at 100yds.
     
  16. gspn

    gspn Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2006
    Messages:
    2,339
    I sight in high at 100. I also fire targets out to 300 yards to see where I'm actually hitting. I never just put it a few inches high, and then trust that it'll do what I read about in an article. Always test it, always know.

    I also check to see where that thing is gonna hit at 5 to 10 yards, while shooting down from my tree stand. The last thing you want is to have a deer step out right in front of you, and have to play a guessing game of "I'm 2 inches high at 100, so where am I at 10 yards? And I'm aiming downward at a huge angle...does that change anything?" It happens. Know before you go.
     
  17. LoonWulf
    • Contributing Member

    LoonWulf Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    9,101
    Location:
    Hawaii
    Ive never had that issue...wierd.
    Again, I tend to plink a lot tho, so I get quite a bit of practice in unknown yardage...
    I've also only shot maybe a dozen animals, archery included, that I had an exact distance for.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2019
    horsey300 and troy fairweather like this.
  18. Bfh_auto

    Bfh_auto Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2016
    Messages:
    2,497
    I think he's getting at the idea that it'll drop close to x" and the target is at close to y yards can add up to wounded game.
    You may be lucky and the tolerances balance out or you may be stacking them.
    Like you I do a lot of UKD plinking and got good at the "I'll hold about there" shooting with my rifle. But I know the drop for each distance too my max yardage. Not a hypothetical.
     
    horsey300 and LoonWulf like this.
  19. LoonWulf
    • Contributing Member

    LoonWulf Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    9,101
    Location:
    Hawaii
    I'm not disagreeing, you should always shoot your dope, even if it's not useful all the time.
    Part of the point of using mpbr is that instead of having to know an actual distance you simply have to know too far, or in range.
    if anything looks like it's too far you simply have to get closer.

    in my experience if I have to start figuring drop Ill alao needed to start figuring windage as well and that's much harder to judge than simply hold over or dialing up
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2019
    horsey300, <*(((><, Slamfire and 3 others like this.
  20. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2018
    Messages:
    4,985
    Location:
    Up State New York
    I think some guys give there selfs to much credit on how they can range a animal. My deer I have shot there's no time range find any no time to dial some drop or wind, so the mpdr gives you some safety net.
     
  21. Bwana John

    Bwana John Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2004
    Messages:
    2,115
    200 yard zero here for big game rifle.

    For me 5.7" high is not in my MPBR.

    2.5" high, to 2.5" low is what I consider MPBR.

    But I consider how close I shot it from to be much more important than how far I shot it from.
     
  22. Stevel

    Stevel Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    Messages:
    220
    Location:
    SE PA
    Thanks for all the replies. This situation is for an open space rifle in 30-06. For woods hunting I use a rifle zeroed at 100.

    For the times I hunt open fields I sight in 2.5" high at 100. Some of my rifles have an inch+ shift between cold bore and hot which has caused me to hit high (once), but it still dropped right there. Add in temp differential and you can get another inch plus of deviation.

    I've never shot a deer past 200 yards and doubt I will. But the situation had me thinking: if I sight in for mpbr at +2.5" with a warm gun, the cold bore could be +3.5" to +4.0". Even if the gun is shooting a little high, it still places me in the vitals out to a farther distance than I would take game.

    If mpbr for a whitetail with an 8" vital zone, though I think 6" is a better figure to use, isn't it more difficult to judge mpbr and cold bore adjustment together? What if you are shooting past mpbr? Then you need to estimate a holdover.

    Wouldn't it be more repeatable to set your maximum rise close to the 6" and aim at the lowest vital spot (the heart)? Well yes it would.

    If you are 30-300 yards having a consistent point of aim just behind the front leg would put the bullet placement at the heart or lungs and help the shooter with consistency.

    Like most things in hunting, people have things that work for them. Sometimes ideas look great at first but others have reasons they may not be so great.

    Thanks again for the replies.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2019
    LoonWulf likes this.
  23. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    Messages:
    10,143
    Location:
    Alabama
    It is too simplistic to say, you have to check your zero's at range, and with the ammunition you plan to use.

    I spend plenty of time setting my 100 yard zero

    DkWLfzf.jpg

    Then zero at 200 yards

    bitI9zj.jpg

    Then 300 yards

    2QG7BEe.jpg


    Here is an example of what happens when you change ammunition


    LkbRc58.jpg


    z3H1eed.jpg

    What I have found is that scope clicks vary. The 1970's Burris scope (hey, I had it and I used it, and at the time, in 1970, I thought 1970 was modernity, not as it is viewed today, ancient times) is actually a 1/3 MOA per click scope. That was a bit of a surprise and the clicks per MOA dropped out once I started counting clicks.

    If you don't have access to a 300 yard range the best you can do is book estimates. But I have found, in the real world, that book values are only approximate. In the real world, little differences in bullet trajectories, stock weld, scope height, recoil, shooting position, show up on target.

    Book estimates will be close, you should be "in the black", but to get the bullets in the center, you have to test the rifle, scope, cartridge at distance.
     
    Stevel, Bfh_auto and LoonWulf like this.
  24. TikkaShooter

    TikkaShooter Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2016
    Messages:
    344
    Location:
    NE Georgia
    You made a point. My favorite deer rifle was a Marlin 336C in 35 Rem. It is sighted in at 100 yards. In MD and PA, I never shot a deer at 100 yards; it was always less and a lot less.
     
    horsey300 likes this.
  25. newfalguy101

    newfalguy101 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2005
    Messages:
    1,661
    Location:
    Sutton, Nebraska
    I have always zero'd at 100 or maybe a scoshe high at 100.

    I dont believe I have ever killed a deer much over 100 yards and most have been between 25 and 50 yards..
     
    Loyalist Dave and Stevel like this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice