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Thinking About Moving from CA to Oregon

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by spencerhut, Aug 6, 2007.

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  1. spencerhut

    spencerhut Member

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    I've got a possible job lined up in the Portland area. I've been wanting to get out of the ********** for a while and was wondering if there are any nice rural areas around Portland where I could get 10+ acres and have a place to shoot in my backyard. I'm used to a 35+ minute commute. I currently live in the foothills in California on 8 acres, not a bad place, but the poor air quality and numerous silly ********** laws (not just the gun laws) are driving to want to move. This job came up and I'm considering it. So . . . any nice spots around Portland for a firearms enthusiast to move?
     
  2. kd7nqb

    kd7nqb Member

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    where exactly is the job. There are tons of rural areas in the "Portland Area" just be more specific so we can help.
     
  3. carpenter

    carpenter member

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    I have some friends who moved from <one to the other>. They don't like it. Mostly cause the <one doesn't like the other>.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 7, 2007
  4. GunTech

    GunTech Member

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    The Portland area is not too much different. It's Oregon trying to be California. I moved from the Portland area to Helena Montana two years ago, and never looked back. Our state has fewer people than the city of Porland.
     
  5. Nomad101bc

    Nomad101bc Member

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    Just move to texas if your sick of gun laws its just as hot there and alot less taxes.
     
  6. Gord

    Gord Member

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    Thing is, outside of Portland and the other larger cities (which qualify more as towns by CA standards, actually) Oregon is full of two things - beautiful, pristine forests that you can't build in, and tiny little townships that are mostly trailers and old fifth wheels on cinderblocks. The economy sucks, and unless you enjoy a rural, disconnected sort of life (or living in Portland, which is basically ********** all over again) I don't think you'll like it.

    My family and I took a two-week trip up there early last year and it was decidedly not for us. Whether the same can be said for you isn't within my scope to predict, but be forewarned.

    I'm enjoying Utah a lot more.
     
  7. spencerhut

    spencerhut Member

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    Not to be too specific, but to the West of the Williamette River near downtown is where the job is. So I'm guessing a place to the west of town would be the easy commute. And I'm not much of a Kalifornian, never have been, and I've been here pretty much my whole life.
     
  8. carpenter

    carpenter member

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    That may not be much of a factor when they find out you moved from <California>.
     
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  9. spencerhut

    spencerhut Member

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    I'll tell them I'm from East Lansing MI. I lived there long enough to fake it.
     
  10. DoubleTapDrew

    DoubleTapDrew Member

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    Don't like the ones that are trying to turn it into Kali Part Deux. Freedom loving Americans are welcome!
    PM me and I'll let you know where some good options would be.
     
  11. ArfinGreebly

    ArfinGreebly Moderator Emeritus

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    Stereo Typing

    That's typing done with both hands.

    My friends, may I encourage you to eschew the employment of generalities?

    I grew up (or rather "reached age of majority") in CA. I bought my first fishing boat at Raley's (in Placerville). What it has become is not where I grew up.

    There are many who live there who fully appreciate the yoke they wear. The people are not their government.

    Look at it this way: if a community loathes socialism, and someone who also loathes socialism wants to join them and move away from a place that is steeped in socialism, it would see that -- once this was understood -- our pilgrim would be welcomed.

    I moved to where I now am when the place where I was become too biased toward the squishy sentiments.

    When I got here, I didn't push "who I was" on them, rather I sought their guidance. It's working out.
     
  12. wccr

    wccr Member

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    Those of us in Jefferson can do without the oregon folks too! They have an attitude.
     
  13. physics

    physics Member

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    And a gun... what's your point?

    As for Oregon, I've lived here all my life. It's not as bad as those above say it is. Sure the economy can suck in small towns, and there isn't a lot to do, but most of us are pretty relaxed, and there are the forests. We have some beautiful country here, from desert to ocean. Great camping too, as long as you don't mind the rain.

    Portland is kinda lame though, in my opinion, but that may be because I don't like big cities in general. Traffic is crazy here though, although public transit is pretty darn good. Gun laws aren't too bad, but no open carry in Portland without concealed carry permit.

    I don't know, I would rather live in Montana, but Oregon isn't too terribly bad, as long as you don't mind a little bit of rain.
     
  14. Regolith

    Regolith Member

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    The only reason lots of Oregonians don't particularly like Californians is because a lot of them seem to be trying to make Oregon into California 2.0. That tends builds up a lot of resentment. I don't think most Oregonians would have a problem with someone who is simply trying to escape Cali.

    As for Portland....well, to say its the liberal nexus of Oregon would be putting it lightly. About the only cities on the west coast that are nuttier are San Francisco and Seattle, and perhaps Los Angeles. The rest of Oregon is fairly decent, though.
     
  15. Gord

    Gord Member

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    I didn't mean to offend - it's not bad per se, just a bit of a (not wholly unexpected) culture shock going from the 3rd largest economy in the world to a bunch of little towns where the little local grocery store's out of business and boarded up and you've got to drive thirty miles to get milk and eggs.

    I hate California for its politics, the attitudes of (most) of its residents and the thousands and thousands of pages of convoluted, ridiculous legislation and regulation that come out of Sacramento for any trivial little thing, but I'll admit that having several dozen electronics, grocery and department chain stores within a fifteen minute drive is mighty convenient.

    The problem arises when there isn't anyplace left for the grass to grow through the asphalt...

    Southern Utah, for me, is a nice mix of availability (I've got a decent selection of stores here, and St. George has many more about forty minutes down the freeway) and unspoiled beauty - God's country indeed. :)

    Unfortunately, they're trying to do that everywhere they move - and they're moving in droves.

    Sell the manor for a cool few million, move to a "quaint" little "rustic" state whose savage inhabitants are in need of conversion to enlightened liberal philosophy, buy a swath of gorgeous land and bulldoze half of it as the pad for an even larger, gaudier manor, and begin preaching the ministry... :rolleyes:
     
  16. eliphalet

    eliphalet Member

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    Rent, take time to look around and see what you want. You might find you would rather be a Washington resident. It's a short drive across the Columbia to Vancouver. This would be my advice take your time and don't buy at first till your sure.
     
  17. carpenter

    carpenter member

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    Uh, not these days they won't.

    I went on a guided fishing trip on the McKenzie. Our guide complained that natives build houses on the river but leave the landscape/trees in tact. That's essential to prevent erosion, etc.

    The <newbies> come in and, in spite of the native's pleas, clear cut the trees so they can see the river.
     
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  18. Zoogster

    Zoogster Member

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    .deleted
     
  19. kirkcdl

    kirkcdl Member

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    As Regolith said,as long as you don't try to change Oregon to what you left behind,(if it was so much better,then why did you leave? is a common question I ask),then most Oregonians I know would welcome you.But what do I know,I live in a tiny little township that"s mostly trailers and old fifth wheels on cinderblocks....LOL...
     
  20. kd7nqb

    kd7nqb Member

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    As far as actual cities check out Sandy (near Mt. Hood) or Scappose or maybe even St. Helens. Camas Washington is also nice but 10 acres would be a challenge.
     
  21. sfhogman

    sfhogman Member

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    .....
     
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  22. Red State

    Red State Member

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    Oregon is not bad at all - especially if you already have a job lined up! And are ok with a bit of rain. :)

    If you are on the west side of downtown, I would look towards the western suburbs. Maybe the Sherwood, Newberg, or Hillsboro areas. That is kind of where the suburbs meet the farmlands and forests. And the further you get out of Portland, the better the attitudes towards firearms.
     
  23. ArfinGreebly

    ArfinGreebly Moderator Emeritus

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    carpenter

    Dude.

    I see I have been excessively subtle regarding your use of crude terminology and generalities.

    Please excuse me for this error.

    I'll try to remedy it here.

    Yo, carpenter, you're breaking the rules. Go back and read the terms and conditions, and quit slinging insults.

    I hope this is somewhat clearer.

    If it's not, I'm sure someone with more authority will be along shortly to help out.
     
  24. XD Fan

    XD Fan Member

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    Oregon is a great place in many ways. Sometimes the politics of the rural residents and those of the urban dwellers can be quite divergent.
     
  25. DavidVS

    DavidVS Member

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    If you have a decently secure job lined up, Oregon is a great place.

    If you work in one of the few professions that Portland or the bigger towns actually need, Oregon is a good place.

    It is pretty, underpopulated, and the more populated locations are often politically anti-business. This makes it difficult for those whose line of work is not in need and those starting a business. The landscape is great, but what to do when you are here?

    You should be fine, Spencerhut. Just take our time, look around, and also familiarize yourself with Portland's confusing but predictable traffic patterns. Then you can find a place to live that suits you and your commute.
     
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