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Why Do People Reload When ...

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Satasaurus, Apr 1, 2013.

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  1. Satasaurus

    Satasaurus member

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    After reading this thread I would kick myself in the face if I could for not reloading for the entire time I've been shooting. I've shot thousands and thousands of rounds over the last several years and just never looked into reloading enough. To think I could have shot triple what I have really hurts. I haven't shot more then 100 rounds at a time because of how much factory ammo costs. If I would have saved all the brass from the factory ammo I shot I probably would have had a lifetime supply.
     
  2. CoRoMo

    CoRoMo Member

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    Well, if ammo is all sold out from stores... reloading and saving money while doing so means you have ammo?
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2013
  3. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    I started reloading around when I was 16 (9mm was the first, heh). That was a ways ago. I didn't have much money back then, that's for sure. I shot a bunch. Then I got paid to shoot up lots of ammo for years. that was fun. Then I got my old stuff out and got some new stuff to shoot some more. shooting is fun
     
  4. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    I now shoot more shotgun than metallic - but I couldn't have over 250,000 through one of my shotguns without reloading for cost savings
    Whether shotgun or metallic, my reloading costs have always been 1/3 of whatever factory ammo costs
     
  5. Zoogster

    Zoogster Member

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    People that reload like to encourage it but it is not for everyone.

    I enjoy reloading, it does not save much on less expensive rounds, and for the additional time it takes if you compared it to how much you get paid professionally per hour you would probably save money buying factory ammo in in a larger number of calibers if you just worked an extra few hours and bought some factory ammo. So it is something that you need to also enjoy to really be a savings.


    Reloading can also be dangerous. While it can be done in a perfectly safe manner, being absent minded on a single round can cause catastrophic failure, your gun being damaged or destroyed, and hand or face injuries.
    With factory ammunition that is very unlikely.


    I would be cautious encouraging a bunch of people you don't know to take up reloading.
    It deserves a certain quality of attention, which can become lacking in some people after they load round after round and start to get casual with it and let other things take thier attention during reloading.



    As far as positives beyond what has already been mentioned such as cost and tailoring your own rounds:
    Reloading still depends on factory produced components. Which means you are not really any more self reliant, and your ability to shoot still depends on purchase of items you are merely assembling (with some measuring, weighing, resizing, trimming, tumbling, inspecting, and otherwize reconditioning brass.) With bullets being the only component some even produce.
    However reloading makes you familiar with those components, and for myself has resulted in me thinking even beyond just purchase and towards being capable of making my own as well.
    Causing me to think about homemade primers, homemade propellants, and homemade or makeshift 'brass'. I feel fairly confident that even without the ability to buy anything from the factory I could still manage to produce ammunition in certain calibers with even more time invested per round.
    Without reloading I would not have arrived at that point.
    So reloading is certainly a progression towards better understanding and self reliance of what is necessary to exercise a right that has and can be restricted by governments around the world limiting access to such things.
    So even if the day came that I couldn't buy ammunition I feel confident I could still have ammunition.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2013
  6. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    Both of these statements are very true. If it were something I viewed as a chore, I wouldn't do it. I would do what Zoogster said and volunteer for a few hours overtime a week and simply buy my ammo.
     
  7. ljnowell

    ljnowell Member

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    Because your numbers are wrong. Brass is reuseable many, many times. 38 brass is something that I get an easy 20 reloads out of. If I buy once fired I pay maybe $50/1000 cases. Much cheaper than you list. Bullets? I pay like $30/500. Much cheaper than you have listed. I buy primers in bulk and pay less than 30/1000, like you listed, but even if you go with that, ok. Powdast time I bought I paid 13/lb.

    So for 100 rounds:
    bullets 6.00
    powder .50
    primer 3.00

    That makes 9.50/100. Sounds a lot cheaper than buying ammunition to me.
     
  8. ljnowell

    ljnowell Member

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    Do you pay yourself to go shooting? What about playing ball with your kid? Reloading isnt a chore, its a hobby. With a progressive press 3-500 rds per hour are easy. I dont think you would be costing 3x what new ammo costs.
     
  9. Guy de Loimbard

    Guy de Loimbard Member

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    When you reload, ammunition price is not a factor in the purchase of a new gun. When I used to own a .45-70 marlin, I think I was loading 50 rounds for $6 or $7, while store bought ammo was $30 for a 20 round box.
     
  10. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    With some handgun rounds, I fully agree. I can't see myself ever reloading a cartridge you can buy as cheap as 9mm but with most the others, it saves me a boatload. I do factor in my time because handloading is not really much fun to me. It is a necessary chore so that I can shoot the guns I want to shoot, close to as often as I want to shoot them. If I was satisfied with making noise at the indoor range a couple times a month with a Glock 9mm (which is not too bad a way to spend your time), I would be fine with factory loads. I wouldn't be shooting too much .38-40 or .44Colt if I didn't handload.

    That said, at this point in time I won't be casting any bullets. Commercial cast bullets are far more convenient for me. Right now I have more money than time, others have the opposite problem. We all have to find what works for us.
     
  11. Satasaurus

    Satasaurus member

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    I don't know if that was directed at me, but if so I don't need the sarcasm. I was asking because obviously I don't know that much about it. I actually hardly ever eat out because I'd rather not be obese with heart problems, and my food is a lot better anyways.

    Also, reloading would be a lot of fun for me, definitely not a chore. Now I'll start getting the calibers I was avoiding because of factory ammo costs.
     
  12. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    If you really want to save money, and have some time on your hands, casting will save big $$$.
    A bucket of wheel weights runs me $40 and yields around 110 pounds of useable lead ingots. That's 4,400 175 grain .40 bullets for $40.00!
    Of course it does involve a fair amount of time as CraigC pointed out, so it's not for everyone.
     
  13. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    No, not at all. Even though I knew you started the thread it was just a general statement. I think the statement has merit, facetious though it was.
     
  14. silicosys4

    silicosys4 Member

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    The guys that can't save money on their 9mm reloads need to get a progressive press. I wouldn't load 9mm or 38 spcl on a single stage either, but it doesn't mean that a progressive doesn't make sense. I load about 100 9mm in 15 minutes on mine.

    I watched a guy pay $45 for 100 rounds of 9mm ammo the other day. It was the first 9mm ammo he had been able to find in months. I thought about the THOUSANDs of rounds of 9mm I had shot in the last two months for all of $80/1k or so. Last I looked factory 9mm ammo was a lot more than $80/1k.


    The equivalent of the afternoon's worth of time to load 1k 9mm rounds was FULLY worth my time, considering that 1k 9mm rounds is going to cost you ALOT of money right now, IF YOU CAN FIND THEM.

    Very few people have a lifetimes supply of 125 gr. +p 9mm ammo on hand
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2013
  15. Satasaurus

    Satasaurus member

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    Another thing I just thought about is that I've heard it's not a good idea to use reloaded ammo in a carry gun because they could try to say it was tampered with, etc, etc. Is that true? Do you guys carry your reloaded ammo?
     
  16. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Member

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    Let's say you do use factory ammo. What's preventing them from accusing you of tampering with that? Oh sure, the unfired ammo still in the magazine was OK, but you loaded the magazine so you knew how many to fire and then stop to make it look that way :rolleyes:

    I carry factory ammo because it's just simpler that way. But I use reloads for home defense (presumption of innocence is stronger there), and if I run out of factory ammo because the shelves are empty I will carry my own reloads.
     
  17. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    You will hear everything from "It's fine. Carry it." to "No way. Don't ever do that."
    I don't presonally. My CHL instructor recommended not carrying handloads. He said carry factory ammo and put the factory box in your safe. If you find yourself in an HD situation, hand them the box and say, "This is what my firearm was loaded with."
    It may be a little overkill, but it sounds like a good idea to me.
     
  18. hovercat

    hovercat Member

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    Unless you accidently hit a cop or politician during your HD, the police report will list the ammo used as Winchester, or Frontier or whatever is stamped on the brass. And that is the information the prosecutor and defense will get. CSI is not going to investigate the ammo. They know who shot it because you or your attorney told them so.
     
  19. Deaf Smith

    Deaf Smith Member

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    Well in Texas I would not worry much about what kind of ammo I had unless it was a gray shooting were there were doubts about my honesty. As long as it was a righteous shooting I'd be on solid ground.

    But in California or New York? Dunno about the DAs there.

    And if you are wondering.. I do use factory loads in my carry guns. But I sure use reloads for my practice.

    Deaf
     
  20. Lost Sheep

    Lost Sheep Member

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    Subject for another thread - a long one.

    The first question to answer in criminally investigating a shooting is, "Was the use of deadly force justified?" If yes, the questions generally stop there. What ammunition was used is pretty much irrelevant.

    In VERY few cases, the forensics may be used to determine facts, based on powder residue and such, but this is vanishingly rare.

    Of more concern is claims and civil suits for damages where claims are made that you manufactured excessively painful or deadly ammo.

    Having ammo not "standard" has never actually changed a court outcome that I have ever heard of, but occasionally extra money is spent by the defense to counter (or prepare to counter) claims that the home-rolled stuff means something.

    Personally, I recommend using whatever your local police use. It is hard for a prosecutor to claim you are extra-sanguine if you use the same stuff his colleagues in law enforcement do. I have my house gun loaded with Glaser Safety Slugs (they have "Safety" right in the name! - How can you call that bad?).

    But there are a lot of handloaders who regard their own ammo as more reliable and more accurate than factory, so they recommend that.

    Like the subject line, though. Another thread. (Actually, many. Do a search.)

    Lost Sheep
     
  21. Zeke/PA

    Zeke/PA Member

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    I have also found some You Tube info questionable.
     
  22. 45_auto

    45_auto Member

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    I believe that should say:

    "I've noticed a very high incidence / percentage of Morons on YouTube where it comes to ALL things."

    Always remember that half the people out there are below average in intelligence.
     
  23. Drail

    Drail Member

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    People reload because they can produce a better product than almost all of the mass produced junk we are being sold today. I have been reloading for over 30 years simply because I want absolute control of the quality of my ammunition. I have seen too many boxes of factory ammo with primers inserted backwards and sideways or cases with no flash hole in them. No thanks. Forget about learning anything on Youtube. It is for entertainment purposes only.
     
  24. AethelstanAegen

    AethelstanAegen Member

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    Well only if we're using the median for the average. Outliers and uneven distributions can skew the mean and mode average. That said, point well put.

    This is generally true, but I think like all things in life, you have to consider the source. Person A on youtube might well be a dangerous moron, but that doesn't mean all youtube content creators are idiots. I first learned about the Lee Classic Loader from a youtube video. The information from that video really helped me get into handloading. I'm not in a position to be able to afford a press, etc (it's on the to-acquire list) but I was able to get into hand loading with a $25 kit. As 45_auto pointed out, there's an awful lot of idiots out there in general and I've seen some very poor advice come from supposedly reputable sources. So in everything, it's better to a little research and make sure there's corroborating evidence for anything you read on forums/watch on youtube.
     
  25. Missionary

    Missionary Member

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    Greetings
    Because I cast my own bullets (boolits). So if you now refigure your data and the fact reloaders reuse that expensive brass my cost of a box of my reloads is far cheaper than you might spend driving about trying to find ammo.
    If I want a 280 grainer in my DW I have it. If I want a 185 grain WC in my carry Ruger I have it. If I want a 240 grainer at 1350 fps I have it or the same bullet made of very soft lead at 950 fps I have it.
    And on this could go. In the end I have the perfect load for each condition and am never out of ammo and will always be able to afford to go shoot a few more. I will never be a slave to the mass hystaria that empties the shelves and raises prices to somewhere the Russians think they can fly to.
    Mike in Peru

    PS.. I forgot to mention just a couple calibers.. 414 Supermag, 33 Winchester, 44-77, 50-70 and 50-95. Seen any of those on the shelf lately.
     
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