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.44 Magnum Semi Auto Pistols

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by 4Freedom, Jan 28, 2009.

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  1. 4Freedom

    4Freedom member

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    Hi, I am hearing .44 Magnum is the most powerful handgun round, except, perhaps for a .50 cal round. Anyhow, does anyone know of any types of decent semi auto pistols that are concealable that are in .44 magnum? The only .44 pistol I have seen is the desert eagle and its way to gigantic to be used for concealing. I hear .44 is powerful round, but I myself would like to avoid using revolvers. Is it possible to get a gun the size of like a Springfield XD 45 ACP in 44 magnum caliber?
     
  2. Japle

    Japle Member

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    No.

    The Desert Eagle is too big. The .44 AutoMag is too big and costs $3,000 - $5,000 and shoots a different .44 mag cartridge.

    If you want to pack a .44 maggie, the S&W 629 "Mountain gun" would be the way to go.

    http://www.theothersideofkim.com/index.php/ggps/5578/
     
  3. Billy Shears

    Billy Shears Member

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    What do you need to conceal a .44 magnum for? Generally, the only reason you conceal a handgun is when you are carrying it for defense, and that's a task for which the .44 mag is less than optimal, owing to its considerable blast and recoil.
     
  4. bluetopper

    bluetopper Member

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    First of all the 44 Mag is not the most powerful handgun round. There are the super magnums such as the 454 Casull, 460 S&W, 480 Ruger, and 500 S&W.

    This 44 Mag pictured is more concealable, more beautiful, more finely crafted and better made than any 44 Mag semi auto ever built.
    629-3inch.jpg
     
  5. M14/11B

    M14/11B Member

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    Can't see the price tag, tho'.
     
  6. Peter M. Eick

    Peter M. Eick Member

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    [​IMG]

    If you are going to get a 44 auto loader, get a 44Automag.
     
  7. bluetopper

    bluetopper Member

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    Very nice Automag Peter!
     
  8. wyocarp

    wyocarp Member

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    Well, it is possible to conceal a desert eagle. In the following picture, I have two .44 Desert Eagles and two Glock 29s. The Glocks I was already wearing, so I just added the eagles while reading this post. I've worn the double eagles concealed. I once walked between four officers talking in a truck stop without any of them taking notice at all.

    HPIM0326.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2009
  9. jglcolosprgs

    jglcolosprgs Member

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    There is always the L.A.R Grizzly.

    Don't know where you would find one, but it would be cheaper than the Auto Mag.
     
  10. tostada

    tostada Member

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    You heard that the .44 Magnum is the most powerful handgun? Wasn't that because Clint Eastwood said it in 1971?

    The .44 Magnum is a revolver cartridge. That's why there aren't many autoloaders that fire it. The Desert Eagle is the only one I can think of. The .44 AutoMag is an impossible gun to find. If you did, it would probably cost you $3,000. They have their own special ammo -- they don't shoot .44 Magnum. Some Desert Eagles and the AutoMag V shoots .50 AE, but those are also huge guns that are ridiculously expensive.

    You sound like you don't have much experience with guns, and you're rushing out to get a .44 Magnum because someone told you it was really powerful. You mentioned a Desert Eagle being too large to conceal, so one would assume that you're looking for a concealed carry piece. Do you want something reliable to carry, or do you just want to impress people? If you really want a .44 Magnum to carry, it's going to have to be a revolver.

    10mm Auto is the biggest thing you're going to find a concealable autoloader chambered in, and certainly the biggest thing that anybody will ever argue as being practical to conceal. It's got more recoil than a .40 or .45, and it's pretty close to a full-load .44 Magnum. The Glock 20 and 29 are 10mm autos. The 29 is the small one and the 20 is the full-size one. If you don't like Glocks, you can get an EAA Witness or a Kimber in 10mm.
     
  11. 4Freedom

    4Freedom member

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    Yep, I am not hiding the fact I am a newbie. But I am aching to get myself also a real powerful piece, one that I can take out to the forest, as well to city if I can conceal it there too. I had couple run-ins with black bear and cougars that have given me a certain paranoia of being in the forest, unarmed. I like to know I have a piece that can defend me, in the very rare occasion, that something awry can occur. Of course, the other reason I like to have a gun, is I just like to have a real powerful gun for the fun of it, that also has practical use. Yes, if it impresses people, I hope that is not a sin. In reality, I am not out to impress people, I just want a powerful gun that can be used in a variety of situations. I plan on doing back country hiking and pulling out the 12ga quickly is not an option, all the time.


    Oh, I don't know much about the 10mm Auto. Can you tell me more about it? Is the 10mm a more powerful round than the .45? I have heard people mentioning it on the board, but not familiar with this gun. I am still learning more about each caliber and have read about 9mm, .357, .40, .45 and it seems the .45 is the most penetrating, whereas the 9mm is most economical, and .40 a cross between the two.

    I also plan on buying a .40 caliber gun, like the S&W M&P or Springfield XDM, Sig .40 or something of the like, but would like a more powerful gun as well. Perhaps I am thinking of finding a cheaper pocket gun, in addition to this, like a Ruger LCP.

    Anyway, I would like to know more of the 10mm pistol. How does the cost of the bullets compare to a .45? How many rounds do double stack (if such exist) mags hold on average for 10mm pistols? What is the penetartion of the 10mm pistol like compared to that of .45?




    To Parisite:
    I really like the look of that gun. Is it hard to shoot, being so small? Do you think this gun can fit in your pocket or is it too big? Would you think it would be a replacement to a Ruger LCP or a Kel-Tec? I was thinking of getting a Ruger LCP or Kel-Tec gun, but some people tell me they are not the most reliable.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2009
  12. Mastiff

    Mastiff Member

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    Try the 460 Rowland. You can get the ballistics of the 44 Magnum in a 1911 type semi-auto. You can switch off the 460 Rowland conversion with the regular 45 pieces, allowing your 1911 to do double duty.
    From Wikipedia:
    The .460 Rowland is a proprietary cartridge intended to attain .44 Remington Magnum level performance with a M1911-pattern semi-automatic pistol. The cartridge concept originated with Johnny Rowland, the host of "The Shooting Show". In 1996, Rowland worked with Starline Brass to finalize the physical dimensions of the cartridge, then later with Clark Custom Guns to design a conversion kit for specific versions of the M1911. First production shipments of ammunition and conversion kits were in 1998.

    The .460 Rowland case is approximately 1/16" longer than a conventional .45 ACP. However, the overall cartridge length of the .460 Rowland is the same as the .45 ACP as the bullet is seated a bit deeper. This means the practical case capacity for both cartridges is identical. Case length for the .45 ACP is is 0.898" and cartridge overall length is 1.275". Case length for the .460 Rowland is 0.955" and cartridge overall length is 1.275". The purpose of the extended case length is to prevent the high pressure .460 Rowland from being chambered in a standard firearm chambered for the low pressure .45 ACP. The overall cartridge length restriction imposed on both cartridges is established by the cartridge length capacity of the M1911 design.

    EDIT:
    The 10mm gives you about 41 Magnum ballistics when going with a full house load. It can also be loaded down to 40 S&W ballitics.
     
  13. Billy Shears

    Billy Shears Member

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    Are you kidding me?! If are seriously asking whether or not a .44 magnum revolver, built on S&W N frame (their largest) is a replacement for a .380ACP pocket pistol, then you more than just a newbie, you are completely ignorant of firearms.

    Now I don't mean this in an insulting way. Ignorance isn't stupidity, it's just a lack of knowledge, which is not blameworthy, and is entirely correctable.

    But if your knowledge is so lacking, that definitely means your experience with handguns is as well. And in that case, the last thing you should start with is the most powerful handgun you can lay your paws on. I see people do this a lot. I live in a navy town, and on any given day when I go to the range, there's about a fifty percent chance I'll see some young sailor there, shooting the biggest, baddest, most powerful hand cannon he could get. Desert Eagles are a popular choice (the .50 caliber ones, natch). Invariably, they can't shoot the things worth a damn. And my local gun shop always seems to have a few of the large, powerful handguns they pick in the used gun case as well, which were sold back to them after only a few range sessions. Invariably, these sailors only shoot their .476 loudenboomers one or two times, and since the gun kicks hard, and they can't shoot it anyway, they tire of it, sell it, and move on to some new interest.

    If you are new to shooting handguns, start off with something smaller. In fact, you really ought to consider a .22. That's right, a .22. You see, you really would be best served by building your skills. A .22 is a great way to do that. Something like a Ruger Mark II is cheap, and since .22 ammo is cheap, you can shoot it extensively. Plinking with these guns is also a lot of fun, so you'll do it more often. The skills you build in mastering sight alignment, breath control, and trigger control will also be very useful to you when you step up to something bigger. Based on your lack of knowledge, and your desire to obtain the most powerful handgun available, I can't help but think that the "cool factor" and a desire to impress others does indeed figure into your thinking, at least to some degree. But trust me when I tell you that if you ever show up at a range with a great big howitzer that you can't shoot worth a damn, the only impression you'll make is a negative one. Build your skills however, and become a good shot with any gun you may shoot, and you'll impress others and enjoy shooting a lot more yourself.
     
  14. 4Freedom

    4Freedom member

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    Actually, you have it completely wrong in this case. Yes, I am a newbie and very new to firearms. I have never shot off a handgun before. The most experience I had was my fun plinking Marlin .22 gun I use to go in the forest with. It never seemed much like a real gun to me though, like a BB gun on steroids. LOL. Anyhow, there is not a single person on this earth who will know I possess a firearm than me, so who will I try to impress? I am not one of those gung-ho bravado guys who needs to scare people with my big gun.

    Actually, I have had run-ins with black bears and cougars and do a lot of back country hiking. Now, I do plan on getting a .22 caliber gun for plinking and improving my skill, no doubt about it. But, just because I am not skilled, doesn't mean if a cougar jumps on my back and starts mauling me, I wouldn't want to reach for a high caliber gun to blow a hole in him. Yes, I know that attacks from wild animals are rare, but what I like to ask you is have you ever been followed by a black bear or had a cougar come to your camp at 12AM growling so loud your ear drums burst and your body goes numb? In these scenarios I want a the best hand cannon I can get, if for some reason I cannot have a shotgun or rifle handy, which where I live, is not practical in all places. When I was being followed by black bear on the Oregon coast, I would have been happy to have a .45 (or something bigger) in my hand at the time, in case my pepper spray failed. It will just give me an extra piece of mind out there in the bush.

    Also, the Obama factor comes into play. I hear Obama has some unscrupulous plans to ban semi-auto magazine fed pistols. So, I was thinking of getting some that I like now in case he decides to ban them before I become a great shooter; if I end up hating them I can sell them.

    So, please instead of telling me not to buy one, try to work with me with my situation. I am not a show-off and I am not reluctant to improve my shooting skills. I want to get a set of handguns and will do my best to master each. Whats the worse that can happen? I can sell it for a small loss of what I bought it for.
     
  15. CPshooter

    CPshooter Member

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    You want a 10mm Glock.
     
  16. Billy Shears

    Billy Shears Member

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    Based on what you state, there are certain practical choices before you. For black bears and cougars, you don't need the most powerful handgun around. Something like a Smith & Wesson mountain gun in .44 magnum would be an ideal choice. It would give you the ability to fire light loads and .44 specials for practice, and it's portable enough that it's likely to be on you when you need it. That's an advantage of revolvers which autos don't have: the ability to fire any load in the caliber, even the lightest ones. An autoloader won't function with loads below a certain power level, as they won't cycle the action.

    If you must have a semi-auto, a 10mm would be an excellent one for your purpose, entirely up to the challenge of dealing with black bears and cougars, and 10mm autos are available in versions that are both conveniently portable and very reliable.
     
  17. benderx4

    benderx4 Member

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    4Freedom: It is my distinct pleasure to introduce you to the one and only 10mm Colt Delta Elite!

    [​IMG]
     
  18. laguna0seca

    laguna0seca Member

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    +1

    So do I, but it is farther down the list than others.

    I am curious why you don't want a revolver? They are so sexy. And you can get a Taurus Ultralite in .44 mag, snubnose, and if you don't hit them, the muzzle flash will make them soil themselves.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jeiu9dbDmAU
     
  19. JCDenton

    JCDenton Member

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    you could look into getting a ruger super redhawk alaskan .44 magnum.

    its definitely on my list.

    i saw you dont want a revolver, but ive handled (havent shot this exact model yet tho) this gun. it has an extremely smooth trigger pull. if you master the art of double action revolver shooting, you can rotate the cylinder extremely quickly without letting the hammer fall before you want it to. this means relatively rapid and accurate double action shooting is possible with this gun, given sufficient skill.

    you want something versatile right?
    you can load this gun with magnum rounds in the forest,
    and with 44 special defensive rounds while in urban/suburban areas.

    it only has a 2.5 inch barrel, but it is still rather heavy/bulky.
    you could carry it concealed if you are skilled with concealment like wyocarp.
    personally, i would keep it in my car loaded with 200 gr jhp 44 special rnds in urban/suburban areas,
    and open carry with magnum rnds in the forest.

    if this gun doesnt appeal to you,
    you cannot go wrong with a 10mm either.
     
  20. CWL

    CWL Member

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    4Freedom,
    Check out this website, it has an extensive list of firearms by country and manufacturer. Wouldn't hurt for you to do a little research about firearms to start off with.

    http://world.guns.ru/handguns/hg00-e.htm

    The reason why you are raising some eyebrows is that you are looking at guns and "power" from a kid's videogame perspective. Just because you buy a large bore pistol does not mean that you will be able to hit the side of a barn with it. It's really not like what you see on TV or in the movies, " powerful pistols" means lots of practice time at the range to be competent.

    I've encountered black bears before while out in the woods. Last time was a mamma bear and 2 cubs wandering into our camp at near midnight looking for food. Banging pans sent them up a tree, which sucked as we had to unass and move our camp in the dark. I did not need a firearm to deal with it. If I did, my preference would have been 12ga slugs.

    Owning firearms is great, I do, but you should start a handgun collection with something that you can afford to shoot often and accurately. You were asking about 9mm in another posting, my suggestion is that you give smaller caliber semiautomatics some consideration as a first handgun.
     
  21. benderx4

    benderx4 Member

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    CWL imparts sage advice. You would do well to follow it.

    Not a week goes by at the range that I don't see an assortment of .460 and .500s in the used gun rack that look brand new! Of course, they usually have wide-eyed newbies eyeing them as well. Sometimes we just have to learn from our own mistakes.
     
  22. tostada

    tostada Member

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    There's certainly nothing wrong with wanting a cool fun big loud impressive gun. That's what the .500 S&W Mag and the Kel-Tec PLR-16 were made for. There are tons of guns that are significantly more powerful than the .44 Magnum. The thing is, you're not going to find anything practical to carry that is huge like that.

    The 460 Magnum is a cool round. You could get the S&W 460V. It shoots 460 Magnum, 454 Casull, and .45 Long Colt, so you don't need to limit yourself to totally ridiculous and expensive ammo. But it's still a 4 lb. gun and only holds 5 shots.

    The .44 magnum really probably would be a decent idea for you, but I just can't think of any .44 that would be reasonable to carry. Even a small-ish 6-shot .44 revolver is still pretty big, and you're not very likely to conceal it. Those are really just hunting guns.

    I definitely think the 10mm Auto is the biggest practical/reliable/concealable autoloader you're going to find. Yes, the 10mm is more powerful than the .45 ACP. 10mm is like a longer .40 with more powder.


    "I am still learning more about each caliber and have read about 9mm, .357, .40, .45 and it seems the .45 is the most penetrating, whereas the 9mm is most economical, and .40 a cross between the two."

    Actually, .357 is by far the most penetrating of those, and .45 is slightly less penetrating than the others. The .40 is a cross between the 9mm and .45, but it's either the best of both worlds or the worst of both worlds depending on how you look at it. It's a very high pressure round, so the recoil is very snappy. I don't think many people would claim the .40 was actually more powerful than the .45, but you can hold more rounds in a .40 than a .45. 9mm is good for being economical, but there is also modern ammo at much higher pressure which makes 9mm performance close to .40. The .40 is a great round, but it's not all that much better or worse than other service calibers. It is unlikely that the .40 ever would've caught on if current 9mm and .45 ammo had been available 20 years ago. They're all more similar than people like to admit.

    The 10mm is like a meaner .40. It's faster and penetrates more than a .45. It's more expensive than the .45. Really, anything bigger than 9mm you're better off reloading, but definitely 10mm.

    The Glock 20 is a double-stack 10mm and holds 15 rounds. Any range you go to should have a Glock to rent. See if you like the feel of a full-sized Glock. If you do, you'll probably like the Glock 20.

    Don't buy a gun without at least shooting something very similar first.

    Maybe you should get a smaller caliber average-sized gun that's good to conceal but also something you could take to the range (like maybe a Bersa .380, used Glock 9mm, CZ-75) so you can get a good handle on what bigger gun you want. Like, you could get a Glock 9mm then move up to a Glock 10mm. Or you could get a CZ-75 then move up to a Witness 10mm.
     
  23. rdan

    rdan Member

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    4Freedom,
    I think you need two very different guns here.
    The .44mag is pretty much wasted with a bbl. less than 4".
    Ruger makes a fine reasonably priced revolver in the Redhawk which can be found in a 4" bbl. .
    Do yourself a favor and try shooting a short bbl. .44mag before your purchase as the recoil is not to be taken lightly.
    You will most likely want a smaller caliber weapon for social situations.
    The 10mm Glock may be your best "one size fits all" option for what your looking for.

    nunnya

    P.S. Good excuse to buy two guns!!!
     
  24. CPshooter

    CPshooter Member

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    I understand a lot of you guys might like your revolvers, but why on earth would anyone want a 6-shot DA gun when a bear or a cougar might be attacking them? I think a 10mm Glock holding 15+1 rounds of extremely powerful ammo in a very controllable, portable, and rapid-firing gun is a MUCH better call for the given scenario. I just know that if a huge bear or cat was flying my way, I'd probably start unloading as quickly and accurately as possible. I'd feel much more confident in a *reliable Glock 10mm auto than any revolver, no matter how big or powerful of a hunting round the revolver holds. 15+1 rounds of 10mm > 6 rounds of .44 mag any day of the week, no matter how big or tough the animal was. Just my 2 cents I guess...
     
  25. 4Freedom

    4Freedom member

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    Thanks everyone for the good replies and of course, breaking me in. Yeah, I know I can be over my head, but I don't have much to lose. I maybe am not knowledgable to say, but I do find CPShooter's advice the best. When you are getting charged by a black bear, you really don't have time to reload your 6 shot .44 revolver, you would need as many rounds as you can get. Also, since I am a newbie, I may miss and having more rounds is very important. This is a SHTF kinda gun and I don't want a .22 plinking gun to save my life out there in woods.

    For the guy, who says pots and pan was all he needed to scare the bears, yes I agree, thats is usually all that is needed in these scenarios. One time I was hiking and a black bear was hanging out in the bush above me, doing nothing, I just walked on by. However, one day I was hiking at dusk and me and the bear met head on and he jumped into the bush. Then as he saw me walking the trail, he started trailing me. Now, just imagine yourself walking unarmed in the forest with a black bear following you for 1/2 a mile. Let me just say that each second felt like an hour. My body was numb and I was freaked out, knowing I could be at the mercy of this creature and his good will. After that day, I developed a real paranoia in the forest. Sure, the bear was just scoping me out, but you have to be there and feel helpless to know how scary it is to have a black bear following ur path. I want to be well armed. If nothing more, a loud boom from a big gun will make him run for he hills. I don't care what people say, but I will not go back into the bush anymore unless I have a big gun. You cannot carry loaded 12ga shotguns in many of the major trails around here.

    I think a .44 mag would not make a good pocket gun. I think I would probably try to get a Kahr or Ruger LCP for that.

    On another note, as a forest gun, many people here haver suggested Glocks and Rugers. Well, I think it is a great idea to suggest Glock 10mm, but I have to say, I really hate the feeling of Glocks and Rugers. I have tried many differnet types of Glocks, Rugers at gun shows and shops and I always end up not liking the bulky feeling of Glock. THe long flat grip of the Ruger also feels awkward to me. The guns I have seemed to like are Springfield XDM, Sigs, Smith & Wesson M&P, FNH. They all have a nice feeling grip and feel comfortable to me. The Smith & Wesson mountain gun sounds like a nice piece and I could be open to a revolver, but I think I be happier with a semi-auto. The revolvers definately are pretty looking and may be more economical, but I guess my main goal is efficiency and rounds.

    Does anyone have any suggestions of 10mm semi autos that have the type of build of Smith & Wesson M&P? I really love that gun a lot. I was thinking the .357 Smith & Wesson might make a good conceal piece for the urban environment, although since I am new shooter perhaps people would shift me to another caliber.

    Tomorrow I will be going to range to test out some guns, I am real excited :D:D:D. However, they only have 60 guns to choose there, probably a lot of glocks :(, and also I can only use their "SPECIAL SAFE AMMO". So, I am not sure how that will affect me.

    Anyway, I appreciate your suggestions and help.
     
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