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CCW thoughts

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by John Joseph, Feb 11, 2018.

  1. geneo

    geneo Member

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    what ever side arm I carry 9mm,.45ACP, 357, if I can put most of the rounds in the girth of a body. I'm good to go, if I can't I've got a lot of home work to do .:what:
     
  2. SteadyD

    SteadyD Member

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    Your current carry guns are just fine, though I agree with those suggesting you add in a lightweight pocket carry gun to round out your options.
     
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  3. c1ogden

    c1ogden Member

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    An instructor that does that shows that he knows less than you do. Get a competent instructor!
     
  4. frogfurr

    frogfurr Member

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    Instructors don't roll their eyes around about your gun. Heck, in the class I was in three of the students didn't even have a gun. They had to rent one and buy the ammo from the instructor.

    If you are a revolver person by all means stay with a revolver. Same goes for a semi auto.

    For me in the end the carry came down to what was comfortable to carry, dependable, and that I could shoot well. Believe me, when I satisfied those conditions, the choices narrowed considerably.
     
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  5. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    John Joseph

    Great advice from RovinOn and Vern Humphrey. Go with what works best for you. Over the years I have gone smaller, more compact in my choice of concealed carry guns but it's pretty much been some sort of S&W J frame snubby (currently a Model 649 and a Model 638), a small .380 (a Colt Mustang and a SIG P238), and the latest addition to the rotation is a very small 9mm. (Kahr CM9). I shoot all of them very well and with the proper holster and belt combination carry all of them very easily and comfortably.

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  6. sean m

    sean m Member

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    Not meaning to hijacj this thread, but what model is your SAK there? I'm liking the looks of it.
     
  7. Armored farmer

    Armored farmer Member

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    Its a Nomad. 15184381626251885743878.jpg
     
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  8. Inazone

    Inazone Member

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    I'm sure it varies by instructor, but at my last permit renewal class, the actual time spent with guns uncased was next to nothing, to the point that the probably didn't even see what most attendees had until they were at the firing line. Then again, in the past few years, permit classes here (MN) seem to be scaling back the amount of shooting instruction and range time in favor of discussing legality, shoot/no-shoot situations, etc.

    Since I started carrying, I've stuck to 9mm semi-autos, but they have ranged from full-sized to subcompact, either polymer or aluminum/alloy frames. Most recently (a few years ago at this point) I had been carrying a Bersa BP9 that was perfect for concealed carry, but suffered a hand injury that has made me much more sensitive to recoil, to the point that I needed to go with some a bit less "snappy" than the Bersa, which really wasn't bad to begin with. I ended up with a Sig P239, which is heavier and bulkier than the Bersa with the same capacity, but it did reduce the recoil enough that I can get in a lot more practice comfortably. You might find the same to be true with your revolver or 1911 compared to some of the newer carry-oriented semi-autos, which an instructor may or may not be able to relate to. There's more to size/weight than just concealment.
     
  9. Jeb Stuart

    Jeb Stuart Member

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    I always thought the role of a instructor was to teach fire arm safety, shooting skills etc. A lot of folks think just because someone has the word "Instructor" on a business card means they know it all. Too many don't. I would say, shoot with what you have and train often. You will eventually morph into what gun suites you the best. Or become damn proficient with what you do have. Maybe even go back and teach the instructor a thing or two.
     
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  10. bassjam

    bassjam Member

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    When I took my CCW class the firearms there ranged from .22 revolvers up to a full sized Beretta 92f. The instructor knew most of us where just bringing what we shot well and would eventually get something more practical for carry, he wasn't judgmental at all.

    That being said, I think the 640 is just as relevant as a conceal carry gun as it was when it was introduced. The only reason one isn't my daily CC gun is because I picked up an SP101 for $200 cheaper.

    1911's are great too, I'd take a thin 1911 any day over a fat double-stack Glock or M&P.
     
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  11. Spats McGee

    Spats McGee Moderator

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    Disregard any eye-rolling on the part of the instructors. There are many fine handguns out there, including some in polymer, and some that have strikers, but there's not a thing wrong with the S&W 640 or the Colt 1911.
     
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  12. Tallball

    Tallball Member

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    I would feel perfectly comfortable carrying a 640. I often carry a snub revolver.
     
  13. SouthernBoy

    SouthernBoy Member

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    You might be first well served to make a list of criteria which you may not have given much thought.

    For example, older people tend to lose muscle strength, tone, and tension. They also tend to move slower. And then there are the medical problems and conditions, such as joint replacements, various other surgeries, sight concerns, and hearing problems. Any one of these, or all of them, should be taken into consideration when purchasing a self defense firearm.

    Having said all of this I would, and have numerous times, opt for something more contemporary that offers higher ammunition capacity, better sights (after marked is fine), a higher degree of accuracy, and most important, something with which you can deliver rounds to target consistently and confidently.

    BTW, I am 72 and I train often with my carry guns.
     
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  14. Charliefrank

    Charliefrank Member

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    There's absolutely nothing wrong with what you have already. And if you're already comfortable with them, perfect.
     
  15. JR24

    JR24 Member

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    J frame revolvers and 1911s are still very common carry options.

    No instructor worth their weight should give you gruff if you are comfortable with them other than the tired old "1911s are unreliable" falsehood some subscribe to.

    You may want to look at the small light guns some folks have suggested for comfort and convienence I suppose.
     
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  16. BobWright

    BobWright Member

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    Many, many years ago, a pistol fired a bullet made of lead contained in a jacket of copper alloy. The powder charge was contained in a brass case with a impact sensitive primer held in the center of the case head.

    New technology? You'll fire the same basic round today. And with the same results.

    Bob Wright
     
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  17. John_R

    John_R Member

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    Yes!!!

    Then your instructors are idiots, find a new instructor.
     
  18. Zendude
    • Contributing Member

    Zendude Member

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    I predict disappointment if you try newer guns. The action on your older model revolver is probably better than what you would find on a newer one. And I'm not sure you will find a better shooting semiauto than your Colt 1911.
    If you need a lighter gun, then the newer ones will serve that purpose, but I would not expect that they would be better shooters.
     
  19. Danoobie

    Danoobie Member

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    Both your guns have been a hallmark industry standard for decades. Yes there is more compact stuff, and
    higher capacity stuff. But I carry a Kimber K6s, which in most respects is very similar to your S&W 640. At
    times, I also carry a 1911.
    IMO, if you want to go smaller, embrace the lighter, compact designs of the .380 caliber.
     
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  20. John Joseph

    John Joseph Member

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    Thank you all for reaffirming my original considerations.
     
  21. Triggernosis

    Triggernosis Member

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    If you end up with an instructor that poo-poos your 640, find another instructor. Immediately !

    Edit: I see doubleh already said the same thing. But it's worth repeating.
     
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  22. ChanceMcCall

    ChanceMcCall Member

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    Yeah. First, a question:

    From your wording regarding your prior permit, I assume you live in a state that requires you to list the guns on your permit that you will actually carry, which I think many responder's missed. That sentence contains both an assumption and a guess, which makes me uncomfortable. Could you clear that up?

    Second a disclaimer: I have no idea what state we are talking about so I don't know what the actual shooting requirements are. In most states, acceptable scores and distances are far less taxing than for the average LE agency requires of their new recruits to graduate. So, I'm guessing you are too worried about your ability to qualify on the shooting portion of the training. That means, if I am right, that you could purchase a new gun that you prefer to carry, burn a box of ammo through it the day before the class and you should be good to go.

    Another thought: A full size 1911 is heavy and difficult to conceal but it is a gun you know and like. Have you considered staying in the same line with a gun more likely to work for concealed carry? Springfield Armory, for example, makes the Range Officer Compact which is both smaller and lighter and fine gun at a reasonable price. (Normally under $850.00) If you sold your 1911 or traded it, that would recover some of the expenditure.

    Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018
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  23. John Joseph

    John Joseph Member

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    California.
    The initial class is 6 hours, mostly on the range up close and personal. That's about all I know.
    When I got my license back in '80, all it took was a DOJ background check and $40.
    The world has indeed changed.
     
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  24. ChanceMcCall

    ChanceMcCall Member

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    California? I didn't think very many people could get a carry permit in that state. My son teaches medicine and does medical research at Stanford and he was under the impression that a CCW permit in California was almost impossible. (He has a combination of permits that cover him in many states and has had since he was old enough to apply.) I'm going to tell him to check into this better. Thanks.
     
  25. kozak6

    kozak6 Member

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    If you have no issue carrying and shooting your old guns, you don't need to buy a new one.

    In California, you are still able to carry concealed in your own home, although that might not include the front yard or back yard. As long as you are careful to disarm before leaving, wearing them around the house for a week seems like a pretty good test. If the bulk or weight doesn't prove any issues, you are good to go.

    If the instructor laughs at your pistols, get a refund and take a different class.

    A full sized 1911 isn't ideal for carry, but is nothing to sneeze at if you can pull it off.

    The S&W represents an informed choice and is no less relevant than yesteryear.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2018
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