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Favorite "gun" scene in a movie?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by ArmedOkie, Sep 6, 2013.

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  1. jakk280rem

    jakk280rem Member

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    The vent scene in "Aliens" in a favorite. But it wasn't a BHP, it was a nickel plated second gen S&W.

    Same movie, I love when they are searching the reactor room for people and the aliens are closing in Vasquez yells "let's rock!!!" and opens up with her minigun. Great scene.

    Also just about all of Burt Gummer's scenes in "Tremors" and "Tremors 2". Broke into the wrong rec room. "I am completely out of ammo. That's never happened to me before." And the scene where he shoots the screamer with the 50 BMG and it passes through a wall, a building and the engine block of their get away car. Fun stuff.
     
  2. HexHead

    HexHead Member

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    Last edited: Sep 9, 2013
  3. brutus51

    brutus51 Member

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    Just flipped on Turner classic movies, they are showing Murder Inc.
    In the opening scene Peter Falk and some other thug assassinate a guy with silenced revolvers.
    And the guns go phweet phweet, I didn't count them but I'm pretty sure Peter shot the guy more than 6 times to.
    Only in Hollywood!:scrutiny:
     
  4. DammitBoy

    DammitBoy Member

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  5. wolverine_173

    wolverine_173 Member

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  6. anothernewb

    anothernewb Member

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    As has been said, Last Man Standing

    Aside from all the horrible incongruities with the rest of the movie:
    When Bruce Willis's character is prepping for the "big battle" he's sitting at a table with about 50 magazines and a bazillion rounds of hardball loading them. love that scene.

    I believe it may be the only one I've ever seen in a movie where someone actually is loading enough ammo to support the number of shots fired. - not to mention someone actually prepping intelligently at all...

    Aside from that, I kinda like the tomb raider backpack with the magazine holder. Cool idea, looks great on film and, of course totally functionally useless.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2013
  7. Cee Zee

    Cee Zee member

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    Judge Dredd had some great shootout scenes BTW. There are just so many movies it's hard to remember the whole list of great scenes. Eastwood with the Gatling Gun in Josey Wales was maybe the best scene in a movie full of great scenes. The Wild Bunch was fantastic. I heard they fired more blanks than real bullets were fired in the entire Mexican Revolution. That one is really hard to top. The Young Guns when they were trapped in the house. The Untouchables had some great scenes.

    Maybe my favorite of all time is Charles Bronson in Death Hunt where they surround his cabin and shoot it up until it's Swiss cheese and then go the door and the first guy in finds out Bronson has the floor dug out a few feet below the level of the logs and has been laying there like it was a fox hole. The guys gets blasted right back out the door he came in and Bronson slams the door and waits for round 2. They eventually dynamite the place but he's gone by then. After Bronson kills the real killer (Bronson was falsely accused of murder) known as the Mad Trapper by shooting him in the face with a shotgun so that he can't even be recognized the sheriff says it's Bronson knowing it really isn't. He also knows the longer they chase him the more people will die. Bronson was made for that role IMO. It's his best ever in a long list of great movies.
     
  8. BADUNAME2

    BADUNAME2 Member

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    Oh, there are lots of them.

    One of the best of recent vintage was Tom Cruise vs the alley thugs in Collateral.

    Kevin Costner in Open Range.

    Clint Eastwood flipping his two Walkers around to drill a couple of would-be rapists who thought they were carefully disarming him.

    Lieutenants Chard and Bromhead calling the orders for continuous volley fire in Zulu:

    Similarly, Richard Sharpe teaching recruits how to use a musket.

    Gus McRae in Lonsome Dove, when he was pinned down in a buffalo wallow, and got tired of missing, so he flipped up the rear sight on his Henry, and plugged him a thug.

    Kevin Costner again, this time just most of his flashy gun handling in Silverado.

    Quigley. Both the bucket at the beginning and the duel at the end.
     
  9. MattShlock

    MattShlock Member

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    Top shelf Mat!
     
  10. Warp

    Warp Member

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    Yo homie...
     
  11. BADUNAME2

    BADUNAME2 Member

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    Typical me behavior, I posted and then read the thread. Duplicated a few, but also thought of a few that haven't been mentioned yet.

    Killer Elite, when the kid neglects to know his target and what's beyond it. Wound up plugging his buddy through the bad guy's head. Oops.

    The basement bar shoot out in Inglorious Basterds. Everybody had a gun, just about everybody ended up dead in about two seconds. That movie was awesome, both for that sort of realism, and the iconoclastic way it exploded so many James Bond tropes.

    Public Enemies. Lots of interesting modified hardware in that one, much of it based on stuff Dillinger and company were known to have. My favorite bit was right at the beginning, though, when Pretty Boy Floyd tried to outrun a man with a rifle. It was Melvin Purvis and his Mauser sporter, he stopped running, took aim, set the trigger, and drilled him.

    The lion charge scene from Out of Africa, Karen Blixen and her Enfield take the lioness, who's first to charge, instead of dropping and letting Denys Finch-Hatton play manly protector. Turns out to be a good thing, as it leaves Denys and his big H&H still fully loaded when the lion himself charges a second later.
     
  12. BADUNAME2

    BADUNAME2 Member

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    One more odd one. Not a great gun movie, by any means, but it cracks me up just remembering: Tommy Lee Jones using a 1911 as a pocket pistol in The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada.

    Speaking TLJ, I'm shocked no one's mentioned US Marshals:

     
  13. ArmedOkie

    ArmedOkie Member

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    Truly zulu was a great movie. I find myself uninterested in a lot of older movies because it isnt realistic enough for me, and i fall out of the story and back to reality. Its a weakness, but this is one of several (ok, a lot) of pre-80s movies i love completely.

    Interesting fact, did you know that in the real life attack, not a single british soldier was felled by a spear? Every casualty they took was at the end of a captured Martini-Henry rifle! Fascinating.
     
  14. Cee Zee

    Cee Zee member

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    I just thought of a great shootout with Charles Bronson in Death Hunt. A posse, or something like a posse, was after Bronson and they found his cabin in the backwoods of Alaska. They surrounded him and blasted his cabin to pieces but he had dug out the floor inside and he was down below the level of the logs so they were shooting over his head. When the first guy came through the door Bronson blew him back out with a shotgun. Bronson had several other surprises for that posse and in the end he walked away.

    The Wild Bunch was great as others have said. It's said they shot more blanks in that movie than real bullets were fired in the whole Mexican Revolution, which is the backdrop for the movie.
     
  15. Hatchett

    Hatchett Member

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    I could not disagree more. I have never seen a love for a country and a population better conveyed than by actually quite a few of Altman's films. It's just a love that comes with a deep understanding and a sadness over the insanities and insecurities that come with it. I can't think of anything more sickening than a blindly patriotic film that's trying to portray itself as meaningful.

    The evil gunfighter kid isn't supposed to have a dept of character. He's a heavy. The movie is about the victims who can't seem to avoid getting in evil's way and its a sad elegy for them.

    Unforgiven is an absolutely fantastic film, but it's a film as plagued with cliche as it is a film that sets out to break them. Munny used to be evil but was redeemed because a woman loved him. And she is dead now. How many times have we seen this? It's a beautiful cliche but it's still one.
     
  16. pockets

    pockets Member

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    When Joel Cairo first meets Sam Spade in his office. Mr. Cairo pulls his Colt .25 from a pocket; "You will clasp your hands together at the back of your neck. I intend to search your offices, Mr. Spade. I warn you, if you attempt to prevent me, I shall certainly shoot you."
    Bogart and Peter Lorre...classic.
    .
     
  17. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    Oh..... Yep, sure enough........ Should have been a BHP....... Way cooler ;)
     
  18. Cee Zee

    Cee Zee member

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    I think you missed the point of Unforgiven completely. It was a character study of people who are able to kill. Being redeemed is just a way of showing that some people do stay civilized because they want part of the civilized life. And some people can break away from that and fall back into old habits when pressured too. And then there's the woman who saw Munny as a complete hero. She clearly fell in love with him. She watched him ride out of town on his white horse. That was an intended cliche but it doesn't belong in a western or many movies at all in fact. A stone cold killer was portrayed as a knight in shining armor riding a white horse. You don't see that every day and it shows how perspective can make us view killers as heroes. We hire people who are able to kill as LEO's all the time and we celebrate them when they bring down a really bad character even if they have to shoot them. Some mass killings have been stopped by others with a gun who were willing and able to use it. That aspect of the character of someone able to kill (most people aren't able to do it unless they get brainwashed which is how the military does things) has never been explored in any other movie I remember. And there's the military heroes (something Altman didn't think existed). No one likes war but when you find yourself forced into one you want to win it. How many of us don't know the stories of people like Hathcock, Murphy and York? When I see some Hollyweird America hater bashing people like that it makes me sick. They didn't want to be where they were but they did the job required of them. York in particular hated what he was forced to do but he did it better than anyone. I know people like that personally. I know what they sacrificed. I know regular soldiers and how much they had to give and I remember those who gave all. And then Altman comes along making them out to be bloodthirsty baby killers. That's the character he portrayed on the bridge you know. Yeah he was the heavy like all of our soldiers were in Altman's eyes. He bashed MacArthur like crazy. I wouldn't trade 10,000 Altman's for a MacArthur. The guy didn't do much except keep us from being slaves to the Japanese. How terrible. Ask the North Koreans if they still think he was a monster. Oh I forgot. You can't talk to those people. They're all slaves. I bet a lot of them wish they had been saved by MacArthur now. He was a brilliant man who gave us military victories and believe it or not that is a good thing. Or maybe you would prefer to have our women as sex toys and the men all as slave labor because the Japanese wanted that wherever they went. And who taught them a better way? You guess it. MacArthur. Who stood up to Truman about the concept of limited or political war? What war came along that was fought with those principles that divided this nation forever and gave Altman a foothold in our culture? That would be Vietnam obviously. Yet Altman hated the man but ironically he hated the war MacArthur tried to prevent. Funny how that works.

    I still wouldn't give a plug nickel to watch an Altman movie. He's about as bad as it gets. He doesn't love anything that I can see except immorality. I guess some people like that. I don't. I don't want to. I never will. His obvious hatred of Christianity is plenty enough reason for me not to like him. I feel sorry for him or I did until he died.

    Look I just don't care for dope head, atheist, communist types who hate everything about America. He even hated the tv series version of MASH calling it racist. Nice guy.

    Again the character of Frank Burns in his movie along with the drunken gambler priest was enough reason for me to dislike him. But there was so very much more not to like. You won't sell me on his character so you might as well not bother trying. He was not my kind of person. He was the prime example of the New Hollywood - the Hollywood that was taken over by atheist, communist America haters. He might not recognize the contributions to humanity made by people of conviction but I sure do. He sought to tear down what took thousands of years to build. He thought he knew better like most 60's radicals. BTW most people in the 60's really disliked people like him and I'm not just talking about the rednecks. Radicals were routinely booed of the stage at rock concerts because people didn't want to hear their message of hate. The real 60's was about coming together and loving each other not slamming everyone who doesn't follow your PC rules. And yes his type was responsible for the PC rules. How anyone can think that's a good thing is beyond me. Yeah he likes the freedom to think just like he does or else. He's the progenitor of Obama. He made radical left wing politics a staple of Hollywood. Those are the gun grabbers you know. Those are the tree huggers. I fully support real environmentalism. One of my best friends from college testified before the Senate about such things (damage done to the ecosystem by strip mining to be exact). I should be totally committed to that sort of thing. I nearly died from working in a toxic waste dump. I got stage 3 cancer from it and was told my chances of living didn't exist. Well they were wrong. And so was Altman. My friends didn't like haters like him. He wasn't one of us. He was what we thought of as a pushy do-gooder intent on telling everyone how to live. The totalitarian state we live in was largely made possible by people like him. I couldn't stand him while he was alive and I'm glad he isn't around to make more distasteful movies. The New Hollywood is one of the great evils in human history. We will lose our nation because of it. Heck we already have. Yeah give him a medal for service beneath contempt. I can't stand the jerk myself. I wish I would have been able to MASH him a little. A Pop in the eye would have been a nice thing to give him too. BTW do you realize how awful that dog of a movie was (Popeye)? More Altman work. I used to like Popeye until I saw that movie. He was a guy with real values and he wasn't afraid to stand up for what was right. Altman must have hated the real Popeye.

    So now you know my views. You will not change them. There will be no further reason to discuss the subject. This is a gun board. This isn't a movie review board or a politics board or anything except a gun board so can we PLEASE stick to the subject?
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2013
  19. Pilot

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    The gunfight between Alan Ladd, and Jack Palance at the end of "Shane".
     
  20. NoirFan

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    Unforgiven is an interesting movie to me because it doesn't give the viewer a clear cut hero to cheer for. Munny is vicious killer who has never done penance for past sins, and is the 'hero' only because the men he's pursuing are vicious killers themselves. Ned Logan seems trustworthy because he's played by Morgan Freeman, but the film hints that he also has a violent past, plus he agrees to kill men in cold blood for money. The Schofield kid is a glory seeking thug, but he has the excuse of naiveté. Sheriff Daggett opposes the protagonists, but from his perspective he's simply running violent troublemakers out of town. The film produces a really excellent tension by not giving the audience a comfortable perch to sit on.

    As far as gun scenes go, I like when Munny is practicing his shooting at the beginning and can't even hit a water bucket at close range with the revolver, so he gets a shotgun instead and blows it apart. The way he kind of struts a little bit to show off, but even his watching kids know that this old guy is past his prime, is a great character moment.
     
  21. NoirFan

    NoirFan Member

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    That is probably my favorite movie gun scene. Fight between dissimilar weapons are always fun to watch, and in this case they also reflect the personalities of the combatants; a slow, precise bolt action rifle for cold-blooded Purvis, and a Thompson bullet hose for hot-headed Floyd. Simple and straightforward with no camera tricks or flashy editing. Classic vintage weapons and a great soundtrack in the background.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2013
  22. mope540

    mope540 Member

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  23. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    Ghost and the Darkness

    Val Kilmer aims and pulls the trigger on his rifle as one of the lions closes in on him and "click".

    Same movie: Michael Douglas pulling out a musket on the angry Indian fellow trying to start a riot.

    The Departed: Mr. French cocks the hammer on his Colt Python behind his back as things are getting heated with the Chinnnese guys trying to make a deal with Jack Nicholson.
     
  24. GoWolfpack

    GoWolfpack Member

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    Well, that escalated quickly.
     
  25. wisconsin

    wisconsin Member

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    Pretty much any scene from Shoot 'em Up. Crazy and over the top. Watched it med hold at Lackland.... never had so much fun
     
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