Glock 29 or Glock 30?

Glock 29 or Glock 30?


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IJ1981

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Going to buy a new gun. Glock 29 (10mm) or Glock 30 (.45ACP).

Mainly to be used for outdoor use in trail walks and/or National Park type surroundings.

Thoughts, ideas on which of these fine guns to purchase?
 
I chose a glock 30, and I frequently carry it in black bear country. Reasons: I have other 45s, like the recoil impulse, and have some 250 gr loads I like. 10mm and .45+p are close enough in my estimation to go with my more common ammo.

Now when hiking in Grizzly country, I carry a 44 mag Redhawk.
 
10mm is a better trail gun caliber than 45. You have to reload or be selective about what kind of ammo you use or you've basically got a 40, but hot 10mm is significantly more powerful.
 
I own and like both.

I would go with the G29 if you are in bigger bear area. I would also go with the G29 if you reload.

The G30 is a good pistol too, but, everyone needs a 10mm!!
 
10mm loaded with 200-220gr hard cast from companies like Double Tap and Buffalo Bore will penetrate 5-6 FEET and have taken Alaskan brown bear, Cape Buffalo and just about everything else. Standard loads in the 155-180 gr range have proven to be as effective as anything else on human threats and you have the option of using standard 10 round mags or 15 round G20 mags if needed. In 2019 I can buy FMJ plinking loads for range use at the same price as 40 S&W and cheaper than 45.

The better 255 gr hardcast 45 loads from Double Tap and Buffalo bore are pretty impressive too, but not in the same league for penetration as 10mm. Even the 147 gr 9mm loads out penetrate the 45 loads. But if some one is already heavily invested in 45 and doesn't want to fool with another cartridge it is a viable option. Standard loads are proven against human threats, and there are good loads available for larger predators. Ammo is no longer cheaper, but will be easier to find.
 
I had a G-29 with a KKM .40 conversion barrel. Sweet shooting gun. Very accurate and reliable in both calibers.
 
10mm every day of the week for me. In my mind it is better in every way.

That said....g30 and a 10mm conversion would be nice but I believe reliability suffers.
 
Going to buy a new gun. Glock 29 (10mm) or Glock 30 (.45ACP).

Mainly to be used for outdoor use in trail walks and/or National Park type surroundings.

Thoughts, ideas on which of these fine guns to purchase?

For that application...?

Would suggest a lightweight G41 (5.3") .45 ACP w/ flat nosed ball ammo.

Glock-41-1.jpg




GR
 
I missed your post 2 years ago. I've run a variety of +p and some low-end 45 super loads with 250 gr hardcast and xtp. I haven't had the smiley. That said, most have been with 45 super brass...

FYI my experience with 255 grain +P .45acp hard cast from Double Tap in MY Glock 30.

https://www.thehighroad.org/index.php?threads/epic-glock-bulge-with-doubletap-255-p-glock-30.823644/

If money were not a problem (nice place to be, by the way) I'd go G29 if I wanted a woods/hiking auto. Or G40 with a red dot.
 
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I’ve kicked this idea around for years and thus far I’ve stuck with the 45ACP and G30. I do have a buddy who has a G20 and he’s taken a few does with it using 180s. In my observations a +P 45 gives up virtually nothing to a 10mm, or at least does 90% of what the 10 does, so I’m content to stick with my 30.
 
If you run into a bear on the big side the 29 will be the better choice. That being said reloads are a no-no in the glocks unless you get a replacement barrel. I made the mistake of shooting some reloads from a reputable reloader and second round, kaboom! Blew the magazine out and magazine release, cracked the frame and hurt like the devil! Cost me $100 from glock to replace the frame. All that being said I carry my 29 in my truck daily.

10mm is a better trail gun caliber than 45. You have to reload or be selective about what kind of ammo you use or you've basically got a 40, but hot 10mm is significantly more powerful.
 
If you run into a bear on the big side the 29 will be the better choice. That being said reloads are a no-no in the glocks unless you get a replacement barrel. I made the mistake of shooting some reloads from a reputable reloader and second round, kaboom! Blew the magazine out and magazine release, cracked the frame and hurt like the devil! Cost me $100 from glock to replace the frame. All that being said I carry my 29 in my truck daily.
Wait a minute there.

Lead projectiles should be limited with a stock Glock barrel because they use polygonal rifling. That type of rifling can lead to heavy leading in a barrel. That's why an aftermarket barrel using traditional rifling is recommended for anyone who plans to shoot lead or hardcast lead bullets out of a Glock. Reloading has nothing to do with it. Yes, some reloaders use lead or hardcast bullets when reloading, but it's the bullet type that can cause problems, not the fact that the cartridges have been reloaded.

If the second round of reloads blew up your gun, then that was clearly a double charged or overcharged round, and it doesn't matter if the rounds you were shooting came from a "reputable reloader" or not. There's no way two rounds of lead bullets could blow up a gun. It was clearly a double or over charge situation. So bottom line, whomever loaded those cartridges screwed up.

There's a reason that reloaders have a rule that states "Never shoot someone else's reloads." You just don't know what mistakes they may have made.

Shooting reloads in a Glock, or ANY gun is perfectly safe if you yourself have loaded them with good methodology and care, worked up the load for YOUR gun, and used published reload recipes with the same components. If not the exact same components, work up the load. If shooting the same cartridge in a different gun, work up the load.

If given reloads from someone else, pull the bullets and weigh them, dump the powder, and reload them with a powder charge you have data for, and work up the load.

There are all sorts of copper platted, copper jacketed, and monolithic solids that are great bullet choices for 10mm auto and 45 acp both, and perfectly safe for a Glock be them reloaded by a guy in his attic like me, or made by a major manufacturer. But if I hand you some reloads I made, you should not shoot them. You have no idea if I'm a competent loader, and even if I am it doesn't mean I didn't make a mistake.
 
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