I couldn't make this stuff up...

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Camjr, Apr 5, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. lacoochee

    lacoochee Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2006
    Messages:
    690
    Location:
    San Antonio, FL
    Chimps are very aggressive and can be almost as dangerous as their closest current relatives living in the wild: home sapiens. Chimps are not really suitable for captive living especially in medical settings, they tend to resent it. (Not to mention it's wrong)

    My point wasn't that I would not have shot the animal given the circumstances, my wife works with them as well as gorilla's (no comments please :rolleyes:) and I know how dangerous they are. Just watch their eyes it's uncanny, big cats either ignore you or watch you like a bird, elephants keep an eye on you but as long as you stay away from them the typically won't hurt you, chimps see you as slightly taller and weaker one of them. Pan troglodytes remembers every insult, hurt and slight and will not just seek to kill you but will actually seek to maximize the pain you feel as he does so.

    I would think at a minimum you would need 357 magnum or above as well as very steady hand and extremely quick reflexes to stand a chance.
     
  2. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Messages:
    18,549
    Location:
    Lexington,North Carolina...or thereabouts
    An angry Chimp isn't a joke.

    Several years ago, there was a guy who toured with small carnivals with a 90-pound male Chimp named "Joe."

    He was a regular at the King fair in NC. King was my old hometown before moving here.

    The rules were simple. If anyone could best Joe in a no-holds barred slugfest, there was a 200-dollar prize. It cost 5 bucks to try him on for size.
    He was equipped with boxing gloves for the safety of his opponents.

    In the 20-odd years that Joe "performed" at the King fair...the guy never paid anyone the 200 clams. Ever. He even whipped a pair big football players from Wake Forest at the same time...given a special "Two-fer" by Joe's buddy and handler.

    The only thing was that Joe hated the smell of alcohol on your breath, and it enraged him. If you entered the ring while drinking, you did so at your own risk. One of the young lions that night had been drinking. Joe broke both of his arms and one of his legs.

    The Humane Society investigated once...watching from the crowd of spectators...fully expecting to get evidence of cruelty to animals that would let them take Joe. They left in shock...considered a Society to Prevent anyone from challenging Joe.

    Joe was always a true sportsman. He always gave those whom he had beaten down a gentle hug as they were being led dazed out of the ring...if they were actually still able to walk.

    Well...Except those who had been drinking. He sat in his corner and glared at the imbibers of John Barleycorn as they were carried out.

    So...no. An aggressive, enraged Chimp is no laughing matter. They're faster than you can believe and they're stupid strong.
     
  3. cornman

    cornman member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2007
    Messages:
    472
    Flailing arms is not what i call dangerous. Are cops trained now days to shoot anytime the have a chance to?
     
  4. jerkface11

    jerkface11 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    Messages:
    5,500
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Cornman the next time a chimp breaks out we'll get them to call you instead ok?
     
  5. CalebJns

    CalebJns Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2008
    Messages:
    144
    Location:
    Near Birmingham, AL
    I prefer to keep my distance...yes they are animals and should be treated with respect; for no other reason, other than their strength. They are ANIMALS, very big difference then a human being! (another discussion on its own). I would be curious to know, what kind of "testing" they are doing! 3 in the last 5 months? something needs to be investigated!
     
  6. MASTEROFMALICE

    MASTEROFMALICE member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    711
    The effectiveness of the round is EXACTLY the same on a 100 pound chimp as it would be on a 100 pound human.

    That's it, really. It is physically exact with the possible exception of a little more muscle where there would be fat on a human.

    Having said that, who can guess why the shot was ineffective in the above story?

    The answer is training. Humans are trained. We watch TV and we watch movies and so we are taught that when we are shot, we fall over. We are taught that when we are shot, we die from that shot.

    An animal wouldn't flinch away from a gun like a human would. Is there any doubt to this? Try this experiment with a friend. Take a cold iron and push the metal faceplate against someone without warning. The person will almost always flinch away, maybe even scream. Why? Because we are taught that irons are hot, even when they're not hot.

    Push an iron against your dog and he'll just look at you like you're an idiot.

    Humans tend to react the way they think they're supposed to react, animals are far more stimulus/response oriented.
     
  7. rocinante

    rocinante Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2007
    Messages:
    1,306
    Location:
    Alpharetta GA
    Why is that? Did they get some super duper muscle gene ingredient or did humans just get short changed? Do they just work out more?

    Sounded to me like the article author went out of his way to make the officer sound like Barney Fife.
     
  8. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Messages:
    18,549
    Location:
    Lexington,North Carolina...or thereabouts
    I believe it's 5-7 times for males, depending on the age of the Chimp...and that's an average size comparison...not pound for pound.

    Try to keep a little Spider Monkey from taking something out of your hand that he really wants, and you can get a fair idea of how it would go with an 80-pound Chimpanzee.
     
  9. tommytrauma

    tommytrauma Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    438
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I read a Dean Koontz novel involving monkeys with genetically enhanced intelligence and an extremely bad mean streak several years ago. One of the protagonists was carrying a Mossburg 500. My 12 guage has been referred to as the monkey gun ever since.
     
  10. jakeswensonmt

    jakeswensonmt Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Messages:
    297
    Location:
    Western Montana
    I don't know why, ape testosterone I guess. As a rule animals usually put humans to shame with their physical strength and speed.

    And estimates of chimp strength do vary, I remember one ape expert saying 7-12, and in the very article I quoted a different range was listed, and others here have posted figures as low as 5-7. Perhaps some of the higher figures are calculated as times-stronger-per-pound and the lower ones are a straight comparison.

    Even if we assume the low end and 5-7 is accurate, it's still amazingly powerful. It would be like Woody Allen vs Mike Tyson.
     
  11. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Messages:
    18,549
    Location:
    Lexington,North Carolina...or thereabouts
    It's got a lot to do with muscle density and how it's attached to the bone...Leverage, etc.

    Like that average-lookin' guy we all know who...no matter who he arm wrestles with...just seems to slap everybody's knuckles on the table with very little apparent effort.
     
  12. Horsesense

    Horsesense Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2003
    Messages:
    565
    lacoochee, MD Anderson is on the cutting edge in cancer research. I pray you never find yourself in a position where you need the benefits of their valuable research.
     
  13. Omaney

    Omaney Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Messages:
    522
    Location:
    N. Central TX
    I got bit by a monkey once. After the ebola cleared up, I really wanted to shoot that monkey. I hate monkeys.
     
  14. Vaarok

    Vaarok Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,887
    Location:
    Varies
    In Africa, chimpanzees raid villages and eat babies and children. Ecologically, they're arboreal wolves. Pack hunting, smart, carnivorous, and dangerous.

    And perhaps the phrase "Clyde, scrap the caddy" might mean something to some of you? That was an Orangutan, but the principle is the same. These are species who can hang upside down by one arm and perform incredible gymnastics because their arm articulations have phenomenal leverage.

    People just don't realize how dangerous animals can be. We're around moderately civilized humans most of the time and don't understand the immense potential for harm that comes from something that isn't conditioned through society or domestication to be docile and harmless.

    Just look how dangerous a violent drunk is, and then amplify with natural instincts, no inhibitions, and in the case of a chimpanzee, immense strength.
     
  15. biggiesmalls

    biggiesmalls Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2007
    Messages:
    352
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    so this is what we're at now? cops talking to monkeys? i live in austin and i go to school at UT. i can tell you the street cops in austin are worthless and now apparently campus cops talk to monkeys. more frustration....
     
  16. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Messages:
    18,549
    Location:
    Lexington,North Carolina...or thereabouts
    Bingo.

    We've probably become so enamored with the Chimp because of old Tarzan & Jane reruns that depicted "Cheetah" as the playful, mischievous family pet....and we came to believe that was representative of the species.

    Unsocialized with humans, adult Chimpanzees are bad news. Even the "trained" ones can turn nasty without warning.
     
  17. T J

    T J Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Messages:
    103
    Location:
    Central Texas
    When the story about the escaped Chimp came out, there was a fellow who called into the local radio station in Austin about Chimps. He had witnessed an attack while in Africa in some kind of preserve as I recall. There were it seems like two guys and maybe some others in a vehicle and took a wrong turn down a road. They were trying to back out and were surrounded by Chimps. One came through the back window like it was water and grabbed this guy's friend. When it was all said and done the friend did not have a lower jaw, hands, feet, groin, and was disemboweled. He said this attack was re-created on the Discovery channel or something similar (don't recall exactly), and that this re-creation was not totally correct, but was pretty close to right.
     
  18. jakeswensonmt

    jakeswensonmt Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Messages:
    297
    Location:
    Western Montana
    Apparently Cheeta is still alive, and is 76 years old.
     
  19. IllHunter

    IllHunter Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Messages:
    474
    Location:
    ChicagoLand
    This thread pulled up a memory...

    from Life magazine, long ago. A lion was chasing a chimp. Intelligently, the chimp ran, un-intelligently, as the lion neared, he turned and exposed his teeth to deter the lion. P.S. It didn't work. The brutal exchange left an idelible mark on me, leaving me a proponent of .45 to slide lock.
    I don't want to know about chimps that eat lions!!http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/technology/technology.html?in_article_id=468644&in_page_id=1965
     
  20. ColinthePilot

    ColinthePilot Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    Messages:
    1,029
    Location:
    I don't even know anymore
    I completely agree with the cop. It was probably out of pure instinct he yelled at the chimp. And I would definitely shoot the crazy animal running at me in a threatening manner with the biggest caliber available to me at the time. I would do the same to a dog, a raccoon, or a sewer rat if they were behaving in a threatening way.

    BTW, I carry a 9mm full of hydrashock, so thats what I would use, but given the option from my (small but growing) collection, It would be the SKS. Semi-auto rifle accuracy and power will win in my book any day.
     
  21. jlbraun

    jlbraun Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    2,213
    The distance from your biceps attachment point to your elbow is about 3". Increase this to 4.5", and you can now curl 50% more weight. This is partially why chimps are so strong.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice