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Popularity of Remington 700?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by 3Crows, Jul 23, 2020.

  1. rust collector
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    rust collector Contributing Member

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    Some years ago, I had a tough time passing up guns that I thought were attractively priced. Fortunately, I have outgrown that tendency for the most part.
     
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  2. d2wing

    d2wing Member

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    The Remington 700 happens to be an excellent design. That design is the basis of nearly all the top level target rifles. It is a strong action that aligns well and has a fast lock time. I have never had a 700 that was unreliable or not accurate. It is popular on her to hate Remington but I don't. I know guys that buy cheap ones, blueprint the action, change the stock and barrel if needed and shoot one hole, not ragged hole groups. They have accurate rifle meets. The reason there is a strong aftermarket is that they are the guns and their clones that win. Check the results of NRA and other National matches.
     
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  3. Coal Dragger

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    Not much I would add for reasons the Remington 700 is a popular rifle, or why it was and continues to be influential.

    At this point it’s basically a platform, the Remington 700 footprint action that is. Nearly everyone who makes wood stocks, synthetic stocks, or chassis systems inlets or machines for the 700 action. Same for aftermarket triggers, there are more aftermarket triggers for the Remington 700 than you can count, strangely many of them seem to correct the defects in Remington’s factory design.

    Now that said I see zero reason to buy a new Remington 700 of any flavor. The new guns are junk, Freedom Group ruined Remington. If you send a new factory 700 action out for a custom build the machine work to get it trued up is cost prohibitive and you still have an inferior action compared to 700 style or 700 foot print (stocks and triggers) custom actions. If you’re buying a factory rifle there are far superior options from several manufacturers at various price points.

    On the custom action front, depending on your preferences and budget you have so many outstanding options it’s almost mind boggling. Two or three lug actions, plunger ejection or mechanical, swappable bolt heads, actions so precise you can order chambered pre-fit barrels, pinned recoil lugs, integral recoil lugs, controlled round feed, push feed, and more options I can’t even remember. What they all have in common is they’ll all fit a 700 stock inlet, and accept a 700 trigger, and 700 bottom metal.
     
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  4. Hookeye

    Hookeye Member

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    Eh i paid 300 for a used like new ADL synth w j lock bolt shroud. I freefloated it, stiffened the Tupperware and swapped the junk plastic trigger guard out for steel.

    It does 5 in.75" at 100 w cheap factory ammo. Just a yote rig so good enough.

    Later i did swap out the shroud and FP for the Gre Tan version.

    So am just over 400 into it.
    Tolerable.
     
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  5. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    The quality of the Versa Max and V3 are excellent IMO. Haven’t held a new 700 in about five years. So there’s the dichotomy. If Model 700 quality is so bad why isn’t it that way with Remington semi-auto shotguns?
     
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  6. d2wing

    d2wing Member

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    That doesn't sound like junk to me. I have heard that even the cheap ones are 1 MOA or better. And it doesn't cost much to blueprint one. A handy guy can do it himself. Brownells sells the kits. I am thinking about doing one.
     
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  7. Picher

    Picher Member

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    I bought a .223 700 ADL at a liquidation store for about $220 a couple of years ago, where I've bought other guns in the past, including my Rem 504, .22LR. Before shooting it, I free-floated the barrel and pillar-bedded the action. Adjusted the trigger also. It flat-out SHOOTS! Groups with handloads are 1/2" or better at 100 yards, despite the rounded forend that is kinda squirmy on the bags. I'm thinking about a new stock, but it would cost me more than I paid for the rifle, so will probably just go with what I have. I have two other .223s and only bought this one because of price and that my B.I.L. was shooting with me at the time...and not being careful about barrel heating.
     
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  8. LoonWulf
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    LoonWulf Contributing Member

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    They may have better QC on the shotgun lines. I think shotgunners maybe a little more discerning in some ways than the "average" rifle shooter.

    I personally don't see any problems with Remington 700 ACTION design. There have also been few, if any improvements since it was released, and other companies versions are better imo.
    The major issues I've had with the 700s were all assembly errors, and tooling issues, that got thru QC.
    Generally there's few enough differences in similar rifles, that can be defined by numbers, that we almost always default to "accuracy" as the defining characteristic for a particular line or manufacturer.
    Certain rifles gain a reputation for being more accurate than others, but I'd bet on average they are all about the same.
    You really don't have to spend extra money for accuracy these days, but if you want a nicer gun you do. Spending 850 bucks onna new Remington to find out if won't chamber of eject properly because someone slammed the reamer into the chamber and raised burrs sucks.
    As does having to get a machining work done on a brand new gun to fix badly off set screw holes, or having to ream out a chamber to get decent accuracy, and not split case necks every second firing (and sometimes first).

    Again none of these were a design issue, they were just screw ups on the line or worn out tooling. For 200-300 bucks I can kinda understand that, but In guns that are double what you'll pay for an equally accurate "budget" rifle, I expect better.

    I'll say this tho my newest 700 actions seems about perfect. Still hate that bottom bolt release tho.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2020
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  9. Coal Dragger

    Coal Dragger member

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    If you want to see some innovative stuff on a 700 footprint check out the American Rifle Company actions, and the Bighorn/Zermatt actions.

    I’m down to deciding between an ARC Archimedes, or Bighorn/Zermatt TL-3 for a build. Both can swap hold heads for caliber changes, both are held to tolerances that allow custom made pre-fit barrels, both offer controlled round feed, both obviously accept 700 triggers and stocks. The Archimedes probably has the best extractor, and primary extraction of any bolt action rifle ever devised.
     
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  10. tbob38
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    tbob38 Contributing Member

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    The 720 actions are sporterized US Model 1917 actions. Remington had the tooling left over from the WWI era, so, why not. They were, and are, very nice though.
     
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  11. Sniper66

    Sniper66 Member

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    I've owned several 700s and never had a bad one. They always function reliably and with my reloads have been very accurate. As to why the success....not sure, but each time I've pick up one, it met my needs for price and function after many hours of comparing brands....Winchester, Savage, Tikka, T/C....you name it, I've handled them and compared them. And I usually come back to the Remington 700.
     
  12. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

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    I wholeheartedly agree with you. Remington was one hellof a company up to Freedom group. Like Winchester, Colt, S&W, Browning and the others. Remington was instrumental in the building and the security of this country. Beginning even before we intered WW2 Remington went from 5 thousand to over 90 thousand employees and built plants across the country to supply the US, Britain and others with arms and ammo. Unlike today where quality and pried is for sale for a Chinese $.
     
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  13. Fabian117

    Fabian117 Member

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    As far as finding the deals, I read about brickseek.com on reddit or one of the gun forums and they seem to be the best place to find out who has the deals. The site is not super easy to navigate but they show which Walmart’s have them marked down. Just search “Savage Axis” and find a model you want and check inventory near your zip code. I hadn’t hear about the site until a few days ago but it’s pretty handy.
     
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  14. Picher

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    The Rem 700 used to be better finished, but now has a safer trigger and the ADL metal has a matte finish, which may be better for hunting. The bargain one I got shoots nice, after pillar bedding, free floating, epoxy-filling the voids in the forend and trigger adjustment. I had a couple of different kinds/colors of epoxy bedding, so I'm not showing the insides of the stock, but like that the forend is much stiffer than it was.

    It shoots better than 1/2 MOA with handloads, so I can't complain and the trigger is nearly as good as the Timneys on my other 700s.
     
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  15. Fabian117

    Fabian117 Member

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    I’m hoping that’s true with the one I got. I guess if it’s not a shooter I could sell if and make some money since I got it so cheap. But I’m hoping I don’t need to. What weight bullets have you found to work well? I know it’s a 1-12 twist so once I get dies and pick a rifle powder I’m thinking about 45-55 grain range.

    Also, do you know what kind of finish it has? It looks almost parkerized, but it could just be a flat blueing. 44239D80-2899-41EA-A515-486501076A57.jpeg
     
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  16. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    I could be way way off but a little voice in the back of my brain is saying true Parkerizing is seldom used anymore, that flat colored bluing is much more common.
     
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  17. 3Crows

    3Crows Member

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    Yes, I am rather sure it is simply a matte blue finish. Nothing wrong with it, this finish is common, it requires less polishing, instead, the parts are bead blasted or otherwise treated to produce a uniform finished surface and then blued. The finish is sometimes more prone to rust because there is more surface area and the matte finish can hold moisture. I would not worry too much about it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2020
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  18. Picher

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    Yes, matte blue, I believe, but it doesn't finger-print and doesn't shine. I can live with it.
     
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  19. 3Crows

    3Crows Member

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    Oh well, fate provided me this Walmart clearance rifle for $99! It is not what I wanted and still do want, a short action 700 to hot rod and customize. But, I will take a 7mm Remington Magnum in the 700 ADL at this price all day long:

    IMG-1404.jpg

    The metal work is clean, the matte blue finish is even and does not hurt my eyes, even attractive I could say. The stock is some sort of what appears to be fiber reinforced plastic (FRP). I swabbed out the barrel, lubricated the parts and put a few rounds down the tube. It was on paper at 50 yards out of the box. I got it out to 100 yards before I decided I had made enough noise for my backyard range for the day and retired inside to further clean and inspect the rifle. I think I may switch the scope to a Nikon BDC and Warne rings I have, which I had bought for my old Ruger that wears a 1964 Westernfield 3X7X35 scope since 1982 and instead get a nice, shiny Leupold for my baby (the Ruger M77 .270). I have a .22 that is in need of a new scope, it may now have one.
     
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  20. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    It looks like a SPS stock to me. Even if it didn’t have a stock and was only a barreled action $99.00 is a mind blowing deal in my estimation.
     
  21. Legionnaire
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    Legionnaire Member

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    Exactly. I'd have been on that like white on rice. I'd pull that barrel and build a 6.5 PRC.
     
  22. 3Crows

    3Crows Member

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    What is crazier, some went for $89, so I feel like I got taken ;) ! Where and how do they decide $249, or $99 or $89? Surely they paid more for the rifle than $99?

    Not specific to rifles and guns etc. but we are entering a period of time that is transitioning from human labor to machine labor and now machines that program and build the machines that build out toys and other products. With 3D printing being used for proof of concepts models it is possible to go from a drawing to a working and finished product much more quickly, maybe a $99 rifle is not so far fetched. But this rifle cost more than $99 to produce, I do not get it!

    I was in Germany not long ago and on off time visited a museum, it had an original printing press, a replica of the very first, running beside a 3D printer! I bought a "painting" made from that press, really kind of pretty. And the young lady running the 3D printer gave me a replica model of the original that she had just printed!

    Back on the Model 700. I spent a lot of time with it last night, took it apart and checked it all over. Looks fine. The bore is clean and shiny and it even has a target, recessed crown. The bolt is very smooth, the safety is positive and the rifle operates smoothly. And the trigger is not bad, not bad at all. I see the attraction to the Model 700 now, very nice.
     
  23. shootbrownelk

    shootbrownelk Member

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    I just bought a Remington 700 with a scope in .223 Remington for $149.00. retail at $399.00? WTH? I didn't need it, but for $149.00 I couldn't walk away without it. Now, if the background check ever comes back I'll go pick it up.
     
  24. shootbrownelk

    shootbrownelk Member

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    At $99.00 for a model 700, I'd have bought a pickup truck box full of them, I paid $149.00 and thought I skinned a fat cat. Your's had a scope did it?
     
  25. 3Crows

    3Crows Member

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    Yes sir, it came with a no name generic scope that seems actually rather nice. It has a relatively narrow FOV but will do nicely on a .22 I have that needs a new scope. I have a spare Nikon 3X9X40 (closeout from Dicks) that will ride this rifle.
     
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