Ruger Mark II Disassembly/Reassembly "Struggle Bus". Latest Experience.

Orion8472

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Most people are keenly aware of the "trial stages" of taking down a Ruger Mark II for cleaning, then putting it back together. The reassembly stage is USUALLY the "trouble child". I never have much issue getting the Mainspring Assembly OUT of the gun, because I have a handy metal loop tool that grabs the Housing Latch to pull it away. After it was out, I had the issue of the bolt not wanting to come out, I after a bit of struggle, it finally dropped out. Now this is the "OUCH" part. I was needing to break the barrel apart from the Grip Frame, so was using a plastic handle screwdriver as a makeshift rubber mallet [that I don't own], and the index finger knuckle of my left hand was just too far up on the barrel that when I made contact with it, I also hit my knuckle. So, of course, I felt like the "knuckle HEAD" at that point. Hurt pretty bad. Thought I may have cracked a bone or broke a blood vessel, and would have a nice bruise for awhile. But this morning, I appear to be good!
After cleaning, this is where most people's "struggle bus" experiences ramp up. However, it only took me TWO times to get it in. I know, crazy, right? The first attempt with putting the Mainspring Assembly back in, it went right in without tension, so of course I knew it wasn't right. This is part of the process that usually does take me a few tries. Sometimes I think it is correct, close up the Housing Latch, try to pull the bolt back, and it only ends up moving a forth of an inch before it stops, so I redo the process, and hope something else doesn't happen.
But for my second attempt, last night, I worked the Hammer Strut into the right position, pushed the Mainspring Assembly into the Grip Frame, felt the tension, closed the Housing Latch, pulled the bolt back and it was assembled correctly.

So the moral of all this is,....I had more woes taking apart than putting together, this time. But I was quite pleased that it only took the second try. Perhaps next time, I can get it all done the first.

I know there are many in here who have no issues and do it right each time. I commend your skill!
 
I had to sell my last MkII a couple years ago, but I got to the point where reassembly didn't require alcohol. The fun bit was getting all the ducks in a row when reinserting the mainspring housing, in particular the bolt stop pin and hammer strut. As I recall, it helped to use gravity as my friend, holding the gun so the hammer strut was prepositioned to meet the mainspring housing as it entered the grip.

Hard for me to describe in words, but it makes sense when you see it. There's something similar with the P08 Luger -- it helps to hold thing upside down when mating the upper assembly to the grip frame so the coupling link doesn't get hung up until it is in position to drop into place under the recoil spring lever.

My latest reassembly challenge involved replacing the hammer and recoil springs on a C96 Broomhandle. I had the Midway video playing while everything was spread out on the coffee table, putting one part at a time back and then backing up the video for the next. Took about an hour start to finish, but nothing was scratched or broken and I didn't have any new cuts or bruises on my hands, so that's victory. Fired a primed case afterward just to make sure everything still worked.
 
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For the stubborn ones, I hit the back of the receiver on a block of wood to separate the top from the bottom. After a few separations, you can just yank the barrel off. Most of my MK I and II guns are that way now.
 
I don't own a MK II but do a III. Sorta the same critter though. I make sure to have the owner's manual on my work desk when I take it apart. Follow the steps described and reassembly is not difficult. I seldom break it apart and completely forget just what goes where when I do.
 
Thanks for the replies. I'm completely fine with "the hassle". It's an amazing gun. Just took it back out today to dirty it back up a bit. It is my most accurate [in my hands] gun I know, so I'll take a bit of struggle when cleaning. It's not like I clean it all the time. Just when I start noticing cycling problems.
 
I'm sure there are many others, but this is a good youtube video on stripping the Ruger .22. Turn down the volume at first for the ads and intro. :)

I field strip mine every time a man walks on the moon.
 
When disassembling and assembling the Mark II you need to bear in mind the location of the hammer and strut. If you pull the main pin and the bolt won't come out, try pulling the trigger to relax the trigger assembly allowing the hammer to fall back to locked position. The bolt will slide right out. When reassembling, tilt the muzzle up so the strut comes away from the frame before closing the lever. While closing the lever, feel for the resistance of the spring tension from the strut compressing the spring. If you don't feel the tension, the strut isn't where it's supposed to be.
 
When reassembling, tilt the muzzle up so the strut comes away from the frame before closing the lever. While closing the lever, feel for the resistance of the spring tension from the strut compressing the spring. If you don't feel the tension, the strut isn't where it's supposed to be.
IIRC, first point muzzle down & pull trigger--hammer goes forward, drawing strut "up", behind it. Then tilt muzzle up, etc.
 
When reinstalling, I remembered the "tilt back" technique. I just missed it the first try. Again, thanks for the many replies and suggestions.
 
I almost bought a Mk II with a 9"ish bull barrel, then noticed hammer marks on the back of the receiver. I can sympathize with someone's frustration at disassembly and reassembly of this gun, but I won't pay for their impatience. Various Youtube videos show how to get it apart and back together
 
I usually use the chemical method to clean and lube both my III and IV now. Lock the bolt back, drop the mag, and spray the innards with SuperTech carb cleaner. Blow it out with compressed air, then do it again. Spray dry lube in it and then wipe the overspray off with a rag wet with a little alcohol. Check for wax build up on the bolt face and extractor cut and remove it as the first step. Easy peasy and works for me.
 
foxmeadow, my Mark II ended up having a bit if play between the frame and barrel, so I had to put a type of shim to tighten it back up, so it makes it a bit hard to get apart. If I don't use the shim, it will rattle.
 
"I have a handy metal loop tool that grabs the Housing Latch to pull it away."

I use tobacco pipe cleaners.

I used needle threaders before but have used the back side of a knife blade.

Tilt the gun until you get the angle of the dangle right

Yep, aim down 45 deg and pull and hold tigger, now tilt up 45 deg and close it, you will feel that it has tension on it before you close the latch.
 

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A fired or otherwise empty long action rifle cartridge makes quick work of opening Standard/MkI/II/III pistols.
 
Slide the mouth of the empty case over the end of the takedown lever and use it as a handle to get it out of its groove in the grip frame.
"I have a handy metal loop tool that grabs the Housing Latch to pull it away."

I use tobacco pipe cleaners.
The manual suggests a paper clip.

The procedure in the manual is actually pretty good. I never realized how hard they were to reassemble until I got on the internet, years ago. I just followed the instructions in the manual.
 
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