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What caliber for Whale?

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by juk, Jun 14, 2009.

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  1. juk

    juk Member

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    Bow mounted pneumatic harpoon. :) Thar she blows!
     
  2. caribou

    caribou Member

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    7.62X54R

    Harpoon them, slow them up and shoot them in the brain.

    goodoldones0329.jpg

    IMAG0027.jpg

    101_0776.jpg


    No kidding.:D
     
  3. schlockinz

    schlockinz Member

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    Sledge hammer
     
  4. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    I'm thinkin' .223. They tell me there's some really good bullets for 'em now makes 'em good for just about anything on the planet. Now, you have to have good bullet placement, but if you can shoot.........yadda, yadda, yadda. :rolleyes: And, ya know, our whales down here in Texas are minnows compared to those monsters they have up in Illinois. :D
     
  5. kd7nqb

    kd7nqb Member

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    Reworded as : Stab them with the bayonet of your M91/30 then pull the trigger


    I like it.
     
  6. Quiet

    Quiet Member

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    .50BMG (bolt-action and single-shot)
    It's what some of the native american tribes, who are allowed to hunt whales, in WA use.
     
  7. Pigspitter

    Pigspitter Member

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    I'm no greenpeacer or nothing, but I just really can't get behind the idea of whaling. Call me a pansy, but I just think whales are to impressive of a creature to kill. I won't argue against allowing native tribes to continue hunting, but it just seems wrong to do for any other reasons. Just my 2 cents. I don't mean to start a flame war and I'm not some anti-hunter.
     
  8. BlacklabelOP

    BlacklabelOP member

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    What Caliber is a Boat? just ram em
     
  9. Pigspitter

    Pigspitter Member

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    But, if i were Ahab, I'd lean towards a .50BMG.
     
  10. bigfatdave

    bigfatdave Member

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    Sounds like a caliber debate to me!
    A well-placed .22 short CB would do the job, you fools are trying to solve a software problem with hardware again!
     
  11. rondog

    rondog Member

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    I agree. For the native peoples that the whale is a big part of their diet and culture, you betcha. But just what does the rest of the world need so badly from whales to justify commercial hunting? I've never understood that.
     
  12. bigalexe

    bigalexe Member

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    Throwing out the hardware isnt always bad, alot of times in my experience in PC repair the bad software was stored on that hardware. Granted you just cost the customer way too much money and probably took longer than needed to do the repair but you solved the problem didnt you?
     
  13. caribou

    caribou Member

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    You guys must think Im kidding......
    Thats me, in the first pict facing the camera next to the guy with cammo on, saw it myself. That 36foot whale took 4 harpoons with drag floats and was shot with an M-19 Finn'd Mosin, and 5 Bulgarian heavy ball in the brain. No more, no less.

    Nobody uses a .50cal here, though the Makaa tribe of NW Washington state tryed one on thier frst Grey Whale hunt a few years back..
    Its an inch of skin and a foot of fat that has to be shot through before you strike bone. Shots are placed in a dent about 2 feet behind the blowhole where the skull is very near the the skin, and the fat very thin there.

    A "whale gun" is used in some Coastal Villages with a 2inch in diameter blackpowder "Whale bomb" grenade that explodes inside them and kills them.

    They MUST be harpooned first, then shot.
     
  14. ElToro

    ElToro Member

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  15. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Most commercial hunting has been stopped due to depletion of the resource. The redhead duck is finally coming back in numbers after market hunters nearly extinguished it in the early 20th century. The whooping crane is nearly extinct just for its feathers which were used on lady's hats.

    Now days, commercial fishing is a culprit. Flounder populations are down. Redfish had been severely hurt 30 years ago by the popularity of "blackened redfish" in restaurants. They're coming back thanks to size limits and stocking programs. I've seen blue crab numbers depleted in my lifetime with the coming of commercial crabbing to the Texas coast. I've seen shrimp numbers depleted. Flounder regulations are being tightened, red snapper limits are TWO fish, now, hardly worth burning 150 dollars in fuel to go after. Shark limit is ONE per fisherman now, okay if you get one big enough, but most in the bay are 2-3 feet, so I don't even bother with 'em anymore.

    Whales are the least of my worries. Commercial fishing is going to have to be curtailed at some point for many species, I see little option. Shrimpers raise hell about it, but shrimping is a fast dying industry. Shrimp farms are far more productive at providing shrimp for the table. Salmon are now farmed. Tilapia and catfish are farmed. In some parts of the world, they're even farming oysters. What do we need commercial fishing for? Get rid of commercial fishing and bring back the numbers so I don't have to take a PDA with me fishing to remember all the damned size limits and fish limits per species. :rolleyes:
     
  16. Extremely Pro Gun

    Extremely Pro Gun Member

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    I wanna buy you a beer!!!! :D

    BTW I would use a 700 Nitro Express If I could find one. Or a semi auto 50 bmg!!
     
  17. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    Forty years back, the giant tuna of the Atlantic were down to 10% of earlier populations--and people STILL wanted to catch them. Same thing for cod, swordfish and king mackeral.

    "We need the jobs!" Yeah, and when there's nothing left, then what? Jobs? What jobs?

    Almost all governments are cowardly when it comes to protections of species. Even ours worries more about some useless minnow or frog than about such as the giant tuna. If the ESA were properly applied, commercial fishing in the oceans would come to a screeching halt. Then, after ten or twenty years, a controlled rate of harvest could be instituted. It works for hunting; why not for fishing?
     
  18. schlockinz

    schlockinz Member

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    Look at the stats for salmon farming. You input more fish for the salmon to eat than you get out (obviously). The problem is that the other fish are being commercially fished out, and ruining the food supply for natural salmon.

    Eat some vegetables or kill it yourself, thats become my motto
     
  19. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Well, what I was reading about, they spawn 'em in the farm, the fry grow up and swim off to the ocean and return to the farm to spawn from where most of 'em are harvested. They spend 3 or 4 years in the wild eating in the wild before harvest. That's food the other natural fish don't get, I guess, but it sounded sort of ingenious to me when I was reading about it. Sorta like free ranging aquatic cattle that always come home on their own.

    I know shrimp farming is under fire to clean up their emissions. Shrimp are dirty creatures. I guess water treatment is a necessary thing in the process. The consumer will have to absorb that if he wants his shrimp creole, fried shrimp, shrimp etouffee, sweet and sour shrimp, boiled shrimp, shrimp scampi, shrimp salad, shrimp alfredo.........anybody seen Bubba?
     
  20. caribou

    caribou Member

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    ""Eat some vegetables or kill it yourself, thats become my motto ""

    With vegtables comes farmers, and farms.
    With farms comes fences that stop migrations change habitat that the indiginous animals use.
    Ranching keeps large concentrations of animals being kept on small plots of lands, and local species of plants are replaced with what the domestic stock eats.
    Insecticides, fertilizers and topsoil runoff pollute streams and rivers, killing fish and such.
    Monocrops take away natural diversity and displace local vegitation.
    Irrigation drains rivers and lakes, and wetlands are converted for crop use.

    There are "Fish hatcheries" where salmon smolts are released to enhance wild populations.
    "Fish Farms" are Salmon that are penned from Smolts to harvest, in large pens that float in the ocean and bays along the coast. The problem with them is keeping that many fish together polutes the waters with excessive fish waste and uneaten foodstuffs. This is unhealthy for the ocean and Salmon.

    The problem is getting to be too many people on this planet, so Id just say "kill yerself" ~~LOL!!~~

    Who says whe dont need WWIII for a fresh start...:evil:
     
  21. schlockinz

    schlockinz Member

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    hadn't heard of farming salmon like that, I always heard that they had a containment ordeal in the ocean, where they would feed the salmon ground fish that were netted. They were having problems with the fish escaping (they were different from wild salmon) and causing some of the native salmon to contract parasites.

    The spawning method does seem ingenious, wonder if it truly is "sustainable"

    Oh well, I'll stick to my kill it and grill it scheme, which reminds me, I need to kill some more pigs.
     
  22. schlockinz

    schlockinz Member

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    Caribou, I agree, I think that we are past the carrying capacity of earth, and its affecting my hunting:cuss::fire:

    I mean, when was the last time someone actually hunted prairie chickens? I haven't even seen one in 10 years.

    Sorry, hippie rant off.:uhoh:
     
  23. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    I think it was Mendel over 100 years ago predicted 7 billion as the earth's carrying capacity. Of course, he made that prediction before modern agriculture. Agricultural advancements have raised the number and I don't know what the number is, now, but we're getting close I'm guessing and the growth is a J growth curve and we're on the steep part of the slope at this point. It has frustrated me over the years that tree huggers concentrate on recycling trash and other such symptomatic cures without addressing the disease.

    But, a man's gotta eat and I can't live without my wheaties and cow juice. Can't kill that. Beer, a man's gotta have his beer. :D
     
  24. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    caribou, I hate to tell you, but wars generally lead to a net gain in overall populations. Where do you think our now-retiring Boomers came from?

    Total world agricultural production seems to have peaked, or at least hit a lengthy period of plateau. And now, "rust" is spreading among wheat producing areas around the world. Grain inventories are at their lowest in about a quarter-century, now, and this year's grain harvest is expected to be minimal compared to past years.
     
  25. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Well, Art, so long as barley and malt and hops are in good supply..........:D
     
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