Quantcast

What do you think of the Winchester (Miroku) 1885 Trapper with a 16" barrel?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Solomonson, Nov 16, 2019.

  1. ApacheCoTodd

    ApacheCoTodd Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2011
    Messages:
    5,083
    Location:
    Arizona
    What do I think?

    Aesthetically it is ASTOUNDINGLY un appealing. The barrel has NO art to it, the sights look like an afterthought, the fore-arm looks sourced from another rifle....

    Conceptually - so short a .45-70 does little for me in a single shot.

    I'd hate to waste space in a safe and would never bother putting it on a rack to look at and would rather carry a short Marlin as a handy heavy-hitter or a proper double-rifle as a non-repeater hunter.


    Todd.
     
  2. AK103K

    AK103K Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Messages:
    6,341
    They are a lot alike.

    The #3 I had was my dads, and I remember shooting it as a kid, and always wanting to just throw it in the creek after a couple of rounds. I used to hate the thing. At the time, my dad didnt reload, and only seemed to by the heaviest loads he could find, or at least they felt that way. I always compared it to shooting a 10-22 in 45/70. That stock sucks! :)

    I got it when he passed and was going to get rid of it outright, but got to looking around, and came up with a load similar to someguy2800's. Mine was 14 grains of Trail Boss under a 300 grain LRNFP. That load is a pussy cat, and you can shoot it all day in a tee shirt. Accurate too, and really not a slacker if you wanted to hunt with it.

    I ended up trading if off a couple of years ago on something else I just had to have in the moment. Story of my life. :) It seems like it doesnt take much to distract .....Look, a bird! :D
     
  3. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    3,385
    Location:
    Justin, TX
    I don’t have anything to offer other than if it’s Miroku the quality will be excellent.
     
    Solomonson likes this.
  4. Gordon
    • Contributing Member

    Gordon Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    9,695
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    Solomonson likes this.
  5. Tommygunn

    Tommygunn Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    Messages:
    6,185
    Location:
    Morgan County, Alabama
    MIROKU. Everything else aside (loading, caliber ... whatever) Miroku makes NICE GUNS!!!!!!
     
  6. Solomonson

    Solomonson Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2017
    Messages:
    498
    Location:
    God's Country
    My typo. 700.
     
  7. Solomonson

    Solomonson Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2017
    Messages:
    498
    Location:
    God's Country
    Exactly. I believe FN now owns Miroku (?) and they didn't mess things up!
     
  8. Solomonson

    Solomonson Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2017
    Messages:
    498
    Location:
    God's Country
    Yeah, me too...
     
    Gordon likes this.
  9. Solomonson

    Solomonson Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2017
    Messages:
    498
    Location:
    God's Country
    Yeah, I don't agree.

    IF there is truly a historic basis for the "trapper" -- if they were actually produced by Winchester back in the day, then they are initially justified by that -- form follows historic function. Going a bit deeper the forearm looks quite nice actually, the sights are modern/adjustable but still fine -- including the front and the short barrel is what makes it a trapper.

    This guy gives one a real workout here. Looks like a lot of fun to me, and it looks good doing it:
     
  10. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    3,385
    Location:
    Justin, TX
    I’m pretty sure FN doesn’t own Miroku though the two have a close business relationship since the 60’s.
     
    Gordon likes this.
  11. Goosey

    Goosey Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2012
    Messages:
    347
    I don't know about the variants of the 1885 but they did make all sorts of short little guns in large calibers, as cavalry carbines. Little Rolling Blocks in .50-70 or .45-70, for example. The one in the OP is not a historical model but a little big bore gun like this in general isn't a modern concoction. I think it's cool. And it's nice to have models that aren't long, heavy, heavy-barreled BPCRs. That said, they often issued carbine-specific loads for less recoil.

    11015405_1.jpg
     
    Obturation and Gordon like this.
  12. eastbank

    eastbank Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Messages:
    4,124
    Winchester did indeed make 1885 single shot carbines, the shortest standard factory barrel offered was 15 inches, but on special order they would make it just about any way the customer wanted. my favorite single shot is a browning 1885 low wall in .260.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Nov 17, 2019
  13. Gordon
    • Contributing Member

    Gordon Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    9,695
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    I had a .44/40 Rolling block carbine like that short one pictured. I sold it 5 or 10 years ago for a good profit to some SASS guy who had to have it.
     
  14. Gordon
    • Contributing Member

    Gordon Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    9,695
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    That gun s almost an exact copy of that including the sights ! So there you go ! :)
     
  15. SwampWolf

    SwampWolf Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2005
    Messages:
    5,009
    Location:
    North Central Ohio
    I have virtually no use for any rifle having a barrel shorter than 18"; especially if the gun is a single-shot that typically has a receiver already much shorter than most other action-types do. Practically speaking, a 16" long barrel is no handier in heavy cover than one having two more inches but there is a price to pay in terms of more muzzle blast and less velocity that the shorter barrel brings to the table.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice