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The Marlin 39 Club

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by AStone, Mar 11, 2007.

  1. Carolina Pirate

    Carolina Pirate Member

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    New poster to Marlin Club. Spend a lot of time with Winchester. I am working on a Marlin Model 39M Article II. Everything is great except the NRA medalion is very faded (I suspect solvent) since the rest of the rifle is excellent 90% +. Anyone know of a source to replace medallion? I checked NRA, numerich,dixie,gunbroker,etc.
     
  2. Irish Bird Dog

    Irish Bird Dog Member

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    Stopped by to catch up on the happenings here....some interesting posts since last here...no new info to add but still have my two 39's. I really enjoy shooting them because they are well built like a fine machine and as accurate as I can manage with iron sights and old eyes. May have mentioned this someplace but at the NRA convention this spring (2017) I talked with the "RemLin" guy and he told me Model 39's are NOT in CURRENT Production. Not that they have been discontinued for ever, just not in current production. His thoughts were they may come back to production at some time in future. Anyone else have any news on this Info from RemLin guy?????
     
  3. chicharrones
    • Contributing Member

    chicharrones needs more ammo

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    I don't know anything other than the 39 is not on the Marlin website at this time.
     
  4. johnmcl

    johnmcl Member

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    The Marlin 39A is out of production.

    This came to me from Marlin today..
    Dear John,

    Thank you for contacting Marlin!

    Unfortunately the 39A is not currently in production. At this time we do not have a timeframe for the production of this model. We are hoping to have it out sometime in the near future.

    Kind Regards,

    Consumer Services



    Thank you and best regards,
    Marlin Firearms

    I am sad.
     
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  5. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

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    In the words of the famed Chester A. Riley....
    "That's a revoltin' development".
     
  6. chicharrones
    • Contributing Member

    chicharrones needs more ammo

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    Not good. I can understand why, but still not good. :(
     
  7. JamesKelly

    JamesKelly Member

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    Can't remember whether or not I joined this group. Oh, well. Got my first Marlin 39A, manufactured 1948, about 1951 or '52. Back when we were all Evil and Stupid and a 12 year old kid could wander the hills with his rifle, in peace. Gave that one to my younger son a few days ago.
    Well, seven years back I found an older 39A, manufactured in 1941. Wife calls it an "antique", I don't understand, it is a year younger than I. Anyway I like it, beautiful internal machining, better than my 1948. Which I suspect (no proof, just suspect) is much better than recent production rifles.
    As are many others, I am convinced that the Marlin 39A was the absolute best .22 rifle a young, or old, man could have.
    Maybe it is not such a shame that they stopped making those "improved" things with cross-bolt safety, rebounding hammer & whatever loading details. If one longs for a 39A, one ought search for a good OLD one anyway.
    In my not-at-all-humble opinion.
     
  8. johnmcl

    johnmcl Member

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    Hi James, and welcome aboard,

    There's a lot true in your response, mostly about how evil and stupid we were roaming the hills (in my case rural NY) with a rifle in hand at tender ages. Today, given the Nanny State, both the police department and social services would be involved if such a situation were allowed. That's sad enough as it is and motivates some, such as me, to that our sons and daughters do know the feel of a solid rifle.

    I'm still sad over the demise of the 39A. Despite recent trends of cross bolt safeties, rebounding hammers, etc, a modern 39A is still the best 22 to be had. When one picks up a 39A, you just know that rifle was meant for ranging (roaming). It's other purpose is to paste a smile on a young shooter's face. That is done and done well.

    My first 39A was a new modern version, circa 1995. My second was a surprise, a 1961 vintage, that was available at a very reasonable cost. The last was a 1964 era 39M that came from a club member who has gone onto heaven. I find that they all shoot statistically identical which I find very cool.

    I'm on the range with those rifles soon, very soon.
     
  9. UndeadPoet

    UndeadPoet Member

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    I have an original Marlin Model 39 (takedown) with a six-pointed star on the "backstrap/tang" and serial number under the lever of "S 82XX." It also has "22 S-L & L-R" (the mark between "L-R" is a dot, not a dash) between two arrows on the left side of the octagonal barrel behind the rear sight. The rear stock also has the white "bullseye" embedded in it.

    I have attached some pics, and would be interested in opinion as to age and approximate value. I am not an expert on gun valuation, but everything appears original, the barrel and furniture has a lovely patina. There is still some color on the case-hardened receiver, and the stock has a few minor (tiny) dings with no cracks, and has a wonderful aged wood look.

    Many thanks in advance for your expert opinions!
    IMG_4001.JPG IMG_4008.JPG IMG_4006.JPG IMG_4007.JPG
     

    Attached Files:

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  10. Irish Bird Dog

    Irish Bird Dog Member

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    No expert to give you any answers BUT that is a very nice looking M-39! I really like octagon bbls and have a M-39 from 1971 with oct. bbl & brass curved butt plate w/brass nose cap. Try this site to see if you can track your 39's B-day: http://oldguns.net/sn_php/marlinlookup.php
    Let us know what you find out about that fine Marlin 39.
     
  11. UndeadPoet

    UndeadPoet Member

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    Thanks Irish Bird Dog. I had checked that site previously, but my Model 39 falls in the cracks between the two options. It was made after 1906 and before 1948, so it doesn't show up in either category. I am glad you like my 39! Here are a few pics of the other side.
     

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  12. Nuclear

    Nuclear Member

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    I have a 39M "Golden Mountie" produced in 1982, if I'm reading the serial number date code correctly. Straight stock, no crossbolt safety, no rebounding hammer, in excellent condition. It had been sitting so long the lubrication inside had turned to a thick goo. Once I cleaned it and lubed it back up, it had a smooth action and nice, light trigger.

    Definitely my current favorite rifle.
     
  13. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

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    UNDEADPOET.................
    First, your rifle is one that should NOT be fired with High Velocity ammo. It should be shot ONLY with Standard Velocity.
    These older rifles will break the bolt if shot with High Velocity/High Speed ammo. Standard Velocity only.
    The Model 39 is only safe with High Speed ammo when they have an "HS" prefix serial number.

    "S" prefix Marlin 39 rifles were noted for having exceptional workmanship and finish and often had X, 2X, or 3X fancy wood.
    The Model 39 was made between 1922 and 1938. About 40,000 to 50,000 were made.

    Value depends on the amount of original finish and color case hardening, and on being in original configuration and good mechanical condition. Condition of the bore plays a big part.
    Here's some ball park starting prices.
    60%--$1,600
    70%--$2,200
    80%--$2,750
    90%--$3,250
    95%--$4,500
    Again condition, condition, condition.
     
  14. UndeadPoet

    UndeadPoet Member

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    dfariswheel,

    Many thanks for the info.
     
  15. snaffle

    snaffle Member

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  16. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    snaffle

    Might be because the starting MSRP of $3195 could seem a bit unsettling to some people, myself included. That's kind of pricey for my somewhat limited means. I would rather see a more affordable (economy version if you will), Model 39A that I could use for target shooting or hunting versus a custom shop, limited edition version that I would be more inclined to tuck away unfired in my gun safe.
     
  17. tubeshooter

    tubeshooter Member

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    On the one hand, I am glad it's available and I hope the availability is enough to keep "the streak" intact.


    But I must say... that is a lot of coin for the rifle! I am curious to know what an extra $2500 worth of fluff and buff gets you for your money.
     
  18. snaffle

    snaffle Member

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    I would love to know what is going on. Now Remington's custom shop is Dakota Arms, they make some nice stuff. But as tubeshooter has pointed out "where's the beef"? The picture that is posted is the spitting image of my 2007 39A which I purchased for $430. I had heard that Remington was retooling the 39 and that is why production stopped. But this thing better shoot like an Anschutz and have exhibition grade walnut if they think that they are going to sell any of them at $3200.
     
  19. kimberkid

    kimberkid Member

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    It seems that when they retool anything its to make production more "efficient" ... which, from what I've seen doesn't mean better, it means cheaper. Anything from using cheaper materials, MIM parts, also fewer steps in machining which equates to poor finish, ceracoat (painted) instead of blued ...
     
  20. Fast Frank

    Fast Frank Member

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    I saw that new rifle...
    It does sorta look like maybe they took a little extra care. It's certainly polished nicer than my 2002 vintage 39AS. The lumber looks to be fitted quite nicely too.
    I wouldn't mind tossing that in my safe, but I'm not going to pay enough money to buy six nice older rifles for it.
    I'm going to just keep shooting the ones I have and be happy.
    It's good to see this thread still kickin', by the way.
     

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