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Wal-Mart raised .45 ACP prices again!

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Black Majik, Oct 20, 2006.

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  1. Black Majik

    Black Majik Member

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    Dang, this is getting rediculous. Went to buy some .45 ACP WWB value packs, and it went up a lot per box

    Now its at $25.61 from its previous $23.88.

    I can swallow the $2.00, but I have a feeling we're up for quite a few more increases before the year is over. And I shoot quite often, so these small increases will definitely hit my pocket hard. :fire:

    How many increases did we have this year now? From $19.97 to $20.xx, $21.xx, $22.xx, $23.xx to $25.61. What is going on with ammo prices to increase this much across the board?

    Ouch. :eek:
     
  2. Hanzo581

    Hanzo581 Member

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    it is $22.88 here, hope they don't raise it everywhere
     
  3. daysleeprx

    daysleeprx Member

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    Yep...just got a box here in the Houston area for that price. :mad:
     
  4. carterbeauford

    carterbeauford member

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    WWB .45ACP is marginal ammunition at best, I don't bother with it anymore.

    Do what I learned to do and buy in bulk. Even Wolf .45ACP steel case gives me less FTFs than WWB, and that's bad. Cabelas sells Remington UMC in bulk and it is quality ammunition.
     
  5. Onmilo

    Onmilo Member

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    Just order some Black Hills Ammunition Company remanufactured hardball.
    Better ammunition and about the same price, even with the shipping.
     
  6. Buck Nekkid

    Buck Nekkid Member

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    The best solution is, of course, reload your own!
     
  7. Kruzr

    Kruzr Member

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    Have you been saving the brass from all those WWB purchases? If not, start now. ;)
     
  8. Deaf Smith

    Deaf Smith Member

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    Don't like Walmart? The answer is DILLON. Get a Square Deal B in .45. When the commercials are on TV, go crake out 25 rounds. You can have a 200 round practice session done in just a few hours that way.
     
  9. P0832177

    P0832177 member

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    OTD prices using Cabelas as source, you can reload 45ACP for about 125 per K vs 250 for WWB equivalent. Now you can save 40 on that price using cast lead bullets.
    Everything has gone up. Powder seems to have remained stable locally.
     
  10. Beetle Bailey

    Beetle Bailey Member

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    Buy .45 Auto in bulk at the next gunshow. You pay less per round and you save time and gas by not having to make so many trips to Wal-Mart. Use the money you save to buy that CZ 452 you want so bad! :neener:
     
  11. No_Brakes23

    No_Brakes23 Member

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    Gee, at these prices you might as well get it at a gunstore.
     
  12. auburnman

    auburnman Member

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    Ammo prices

    I work as a gunsmith part time a local gunshop. Ammo prices (wholesale) have increased 24% since Jan. 2006. Only look for price to continue to increase.... Lead hit an all-time high just a couple of weeks ago at 65 cents a pound... up from 45 cents a pound in late spring.

    Auburnman
     
  13. Crawlin

    Crawlin Member

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    I reload now for about $5 a box of 50. That works out to about $100 per 1000. I get right at 1000 rounds out of 1 pound of powder. It makes a huge difference. The problem is, now I shoot more...For all the equipment I bought, I have made the cost up in about 1800 rounds.

    Bullets - Rainer plated 230 grain(500) - $32.99
    Powder - Accurate #7(1lb) - 14.99
    Primer - CCI Large Pistol Primer(1000) - 19.99
    Brass - Range pickup - Free
     
  14. Crosshair

    Crosshair Member

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    Blazer Brass ammo is getting to be a better price.
     
  15. Remander

    Remander Member

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    My local Academy Store has been out of Blazer 45 for more than a month. I did buy a "family fun pack" box of 250 rds of UMC 45 ACP.

    They mentioned that 9mm was also getting tight, but they recently got a few cases in.

    "Gimme a case" was my immediate reaction. Their 9mm has gone from $3.98 or so to almost $6 in the last few months.

    I also bought 1,000 rds of 30.06 surplus recently.

    I feel like some sort of paranoid nut, but I have been socking away ammo like crazy in the last few months for economic and political reasons.

    I figure it's not getting cheaper or easier to buy anytime soon. May as well lay in a good supply.
     
  16. RON in PA

    RON in PA Member

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    What has been happening is the law of supply and demand with the basic raw materials of cartridges. The demand and therefore prices for copper, brass and lead has been going up because of increased use by China and India.
     
  17. real_name

    real_name member

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    That was the case that the price of copper was high because of new markets, I remember a few threads here about it over the summer.
    There was a whole lot of fuss that the main supply (is it Chile?) country was sitting on stocks to artificially inflate the cost.
    Then a few weeks ago I was buying 1/2" copper pipe in Lowes and i noticed it had gone down in price again. Just as an indicator a 2ft length was about $3 in February '06, it went up to $12 in August.
    Electricity cable went down too, it got pretty high but not as bad as the companies bit some of the increase themselves, I'm told that was the case anyway.
    Add to that the fact that shipping is now cheaper as gas is a lot cheaper than over the summer and you have a scenario where ammo should be going down in cost, not up.
     
  18. Ala Dan

    Ala Dan Member in memoriam

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    Unfortunately, the ammunition market is very unsteady right now; meaning
    that the price you pay today, may not be the same as tomorrows price.
    Lots of factors enter into the equation for ammo company's~!:eek:
     
  19. Lou629

    Lou629 member

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    Yeah, like pure B/S and greed maybe? Just as with the price for gasoline that can never be fully explained away when it increases dramatically or decreases dramatically as is the case now.

    The price for gasoline is down by a third at the retail level, commodities markets for copper and brass, etc, are all down from their highs, and yet the prices for ammo, delivered to your friendly neighborhood store continue to escalate.

    There are currently a half dozen or so reasons (read:excuses) that they give for the increases with the price of ammo lately: "Oh! The price of copper!" "Oh! The price of brass!" "Oh! The cost of transportation!" "Oh! The war is causing a shortage!" "Oh! The liability insurance increases for gun related businesses!"....all of it pure Bravo Sierra.

    What they should be saying is:

    "Oh! We retailers and wholesalers want to raise profits and price gouge just like the really big boys at the oil companies do!"

    "Oh! And by the way, since we realize that we have a nearly captive audience in our customer base, we know we can raise our prices to the most that the market will bear, at will, just like the really big boys at the oil companies do!"
     
  20. Kharn

    Kharn Member

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    Lou629:
    If the cost of lead went up over 30%, expecting ammo to stay the same price is pretty unreasonable. You cant expect a manufacturer to absorb that cost and not pass it on to the wholesalers, who will in turn pass it on to retailers and then the customers.

    Kharn
     
  21. Vitamin G

    Vitamin G Member

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    Actually, i think its totally feasible considering that the cost of metals WAS up, PLUS the cost of actually trucking the product across the country (gas).

    When supply goes down or demand goes up causing the prices to rise, let the free market come up with a way to compensate and have demand for wal-mart ammo go down...
    RELOAD!
     
  22. Lou629

    Lou629 member

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    KHARN...

    Yes, i agree with you, but look at what the prices of commodities have actually been doing. When the prices of commodities and gasoline DECREASE by the same % ( the same prices that are covered in one or two of the excuses given in my first post ) AND the prices continue to RISE, then i don't see anyone being unreasonable but the wholesalers and retailers. You are being spoon fed a line of pure B/S and you appear to be defending them! Don't volunteer to drink the kool-aid!
     
  23. bender

    bender Member

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    in my opinion, anyone who shoots a lot should reload, as many others have already stated.

    It doesn't take a lot of room. I built a small reloading table back in the 1980s that I still use. Its only 36" wide, and maybe 20" deep. And I'm still using the same Lee 3-hole Turret press from the 1980s.

    It takes a little time to get the hang of everything... but you can practice loading "dummy" rounds - no primer or powder - to get the hang of seating & crimping...
     
  24. skynyrd1911

    skynyrd1911 Member

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    Copper is up.....I've been doing a little metal salvaging on the side. Copper & aluminum or the heavy hitters. I made enough money to buy a new rifle & scope in about two months. It's an easy way for me to buy ammo also.
     
  25. Dravur

    Dravur Member

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    Sorry Lou...

    but econ 101 is your friend. Wal-mart does nort raise prices just because they feel like it. They work with market forces just like every other business. When their costs go up, they pass it on to consumers. <also, think about that next time a lefty wants to raise business taxes.... Ask him where corporations get their money. It makes for an easy econ test.>

    Wal-mart sells on a margin. They need to make a set percentage from an item to allow it's sale. Some things they will put on sale and use as a loss leader to draw attention to their store. When Wal-mart raises it's price, it more than likely had to as the dirstributor had to raise their prices. When it comes to ammo, the cost of trucking a small, but heavy item has increased as well as the materials costs. When the cost of gasoline comes down, there is a lag in the market where items in the chain still cost more due to fuel expense as the expense for the fuel has allready occured. The lead got mined at a higher fuel cost, the brass was forged at a higher fuel cost.... When fuel prices drop, it does not go backward in time and lower the cost of fuel allready spent on these items. Does this surprise you? This same phenomenon happens to metals. The metals were purchased at varying prices. If the price 6 months ago was higher for the metals used to actually manufacture the rounds, then that gets passed to you, 6 months down the road when the rounds are put on sale. Did you think the ammo was magically made the same day that it was put on sale? The Keebler elves were working nights to make the freshest ammo? This is called lag and it is built into the market and the ammo manufacturers have to deal with it like everyone else and they have to pass their costs on.

    btw, Wal-mart's strategy is to offer the lowest price possible and sell a buttload of it. So, Wal-mart did not decide just to pump up the price of a box of ammo to teach a lesson to gun people. If they are going to sell something, they want to sell alot of it.

    Now, as to the cost of crude oil and "Big Oil". I know the conspiracy theories are spinning in your brain, but it really is simple, Oil is a commodity and is fungible. In other words, it matters not where oil comes from. Fuel, will go to the highest bidder, regardless of where it was found, barring shipping costs. The "Big Oil" companies that lefties like to rail against like Exxon for example make roughly the same amount on a gallon of gas no matter the selling price, taking out short term fluctuations. Oddly enough, Exxon, who leftists love to jump on for making obscene profits and demogogue like crazy made a 10% profit in fiscal 2005 and a 9% the year before.... They just sold a lot of fuel. Google, on the other hand, made a 41% profit in fiscal 2005. Funny, you don't see the lefties flapping their gums about Google making an obscene profit.

    Now, the one thing you don't hear the lefties yakking about is.... Who made the most money from a gallon of gas? Yep, the Government. Both State and Federal Government make the most out of every gallon of gas, and they have no expenses relating to its sale, where-as Exxon et al, have to take into account exploration costs, refining costs and have to worry about the futures market etc.

    There ya go, a quick econ 101 lesson.
     
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