What caliber is best for a new gun owner?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Vector, Dec 5, 2010.

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  1. brandon_mcg

    brandon_mcg Member

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    +1 on muzzle control. I also find it much easier to teach on a rifle than a pistol. Putting a scope on a rifle also makes it much easier. just tell them to put the crosshairs on the target and explain trigger control, then you dont have to worry about align this with this blah blah blah.

    you always want the person to enjoy shooting.
     
  2. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer member

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    A rifle or pistol depends on what the newcomers interest is. If he's looking at self defense or concealed carry I don't see any advantage to starting with a .22 rifle then moving to a .22 pistol then on to a centerfire pistol.

    If their interest is more general, then yeah, start with a rifle.
     
  3. Ben86

    Ben86 Member

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    If the gun will fill a HD or CC role I suggest a 9mm of their liking. 9mm is a great recoil/power balance. The Glock and S&W M&P brand of pistols are a great place to start because of their simple operation and they are fantastic guns.

    That said it's great to start out learning on a .22. A .22 pistol of some kind would be great to start out with for practice. I suggest the ruger 22/45 and beretta neos. The ruger might be frustrating to newbies because it's a little tricky to put back together, while the neos is so easy to disassemble/reassemble. The ISSC M22 also looks promising.
     
  4. ljnowell

    ljnowell Member

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    If at 18 they cant readily learn firearm safety then they arent the kind of people that should be shooting them anyway. At 18 me and my friends were hunting in groups together.
     
  5. Shadow 7D

    Shadow 7D Member

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    what ever you got to shoot
    a .22 is never a bad choice
    9 is also good

    But if you want to start heavy, practice a lot of dry fire and recoil control so not to develop a flinch.
     
  6. sophijo

    sophijo Member

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    Ammo

    Ammo can be expensive. Pick a firearm he can afford to shoot a lot.
     
  7. madstabber

    madstabber Member

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    rifle- ruger 10-22

    pistol-ruger markIII
     
  8. Spec ops Grunt

    Spec ops Grunt Member

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    .22 is best bet.


    If you want a centerfire cartridge though, I would suggest 9mm Luger or 5.56.
     
  9. MacDuff

    MacDuff Member

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    .458 Winchester Mag! ;)
     
  10. therewolf

    therewolf member

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    Absolutely agree, 22. 22LR is very popular right now, and ammo is cheap.:)
     
  11. goon

    goon Member

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    Agree with rfwobbly. I have taken a lot of friends shooting for the first time and it always starts with a .22 rifle. The only better starting place I can think of would be a Red Ryder - and I ain't got one of those.
     
  12. nulfisin

    nulfisin Member

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    22 Caliber

    BUT a 12 GAUGE shotgun is where I would start. It's easier to learn how to "point" a shotgun if you haven't already had aiming a pistol or long gun ingrained into your mind. They are also great self-defense weapons, hunting tools, and fun to boot.
     
  13. charlie echo

    charlie echo Member

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    12 gauage

    the most fun anyone can have with gunpowder: skeet, trap, sporting clays, & slugs...all that blows through cash quickly.
     
  14. easyg

    easyg Member

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    I recommend a .357 revolver or a 9mm autoloader.

    There's really no reason to start with a .22 in order to learn how to shoot.
     
  15. kayak-man

    kayak-man Member

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    Except minimal recoil and cheap ammo
     
  16. goon

    goon Member

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    Yep. I still shoot .22 more than anything else simply because of the cost.
     
  17. natman

    natman Member

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    You heard right. Get a bolt action 22. You will need to learn how to form a sight picture, how to control your breathing, how to control the trigger and much more. The best way to perfect these skills is with a 22 where you can afford to shoot hundreds of rounds without beating yourself up or breaking the bank. The skills you learn with a 22 are directly transferable to a centerfire rifle and you'll find that a good 22 is pretty much essential anyway.

    Best of luck.
     
  18. therewolf

    therewolf member

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    xxy
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2010
  19. therewolf

    therewolf member

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    IMO, go for the fun rifles.

    Lever actions have that cool Wild-Western appeal, or you can get into a

    neat 22LR AR pretty cheap, too. They're all pretty accurate. If you decide to

    become a competition shooter later, you can pick up some super-accurate bolt

    action rifle later.
     
  20. HOWARD J

    HOWARD J Member

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    I used guns that I had to start the kids when they were 7.
    Marlim 39-A .22 lever action
    Colt single-action .22 revolver

    Later ---they went to Marlin 60 auto .22
    Ruger 22 auto pistol

    Later on---9MM
    38 spl.
    357
    41
    44
    Win 30-30
    6mm rem

    Forgot one: 9MM Uzi--16" & 2" barrel
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2010
  21. Ben86

    Ben86 Member

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    Me as well. People ask me why I don't reload, to which I reply "because I shoot .22 instead."
     
  22. red1973

    red1973 Member

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    I agree with all those who suggested a 22LR rifle. The reasons: SAFETY! Low recoil. Low muzzle blast/report. Inexpensive ammo. Generally more places one can shoot them. Low recoil and low report/muzzle blast are essential for those just starting in the shooting sport to prevent them from developing a flinch.
     
  23. Matt018

    Matt018 Member

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    Allot of people I know just shot a .22 when they started, As in they had, pistols and rifles chambered in them. The reason being is that they could have allot of trigger time, Not worry about having ammo for one gun or not having ammo for another when they were just learning, And once they became comfortable in shooting and maintenance and such they would upgrade to a larger caliber pistol/rifle.
     
  24. M1key

    M1key Member

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    I learned rifle safety at age 7, shooting my dad's 22 Stevens single shot. Even got to shoot his Winchester 30-30.

    Pistol safety, under adult supervision, at age 10.

    And today, I'm as dangerous as I was back then. :eek:


    M
     
  25. gym

    gym member

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    9mm
     
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