Do you feel more sentimental towards metal guns?

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by KarateHottie93, Jun 10, 2022.

  1. KarateHottie93

    KarateHottie93 Member

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    With the exception of my TRR8 that I pawned recently (and plan on getting back very soon), a Rock Island 206 that I pawned for good after a botched RMA turned me off, and a Beretta 51 I gave to an old manager...I have a hard time separating from my metal guns. You could also include some cheap off brand relics from dead companies I've bought and sold along the way but I think you get the point here. I have a hard time separating from GOOD metal handguns. I don't like separating from any firearms but it's always been so much easier for me to let polymer guns go. I don't get why. I love them just as much at first. I think a lot of them are better guns in general. I find that a lot of the name brand polymer guns feel more solid and well built to me than most metal guns...and yes I know how dumb that sounds. For whatever reason though...damn I just can't let these three go.

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    Last edited: Jun 11, 2022
  2. LoonWulf
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    LoonWulf Contributing Member

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    not really.

    Ive gotten rid of more poly guns, but they are cheaper and easier on my budget. I like the heft and feel of metal, aluminum included, but beyond that I don't care what the things made of.
     
  3. Pat Riot
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    Pat Riot Contributing Member

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    If a gun isn’t accurate or reliable it doesn’t matter what it’s made of, it goes.
     
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  4. CDW4ME

    CDW4ME Member

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    Not at all, and the cliché of metal guns (1911's) having soul but polymer lacking one is as nonsensical as the notion of "caliber war". :barf:
     
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  5. TarDevil

    TarDevil Member

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    Guns... like airplanes... you place your life in their hands.

    My hands don't care what material lies beneath. Do I go home at the end of the day, that's paramount.
     
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  6. Mosin77

    Mosin77 Member

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    I agree with the premise of the post.

    I think if you are the type to be especially attached to your guns, you are more likely to have that extra fondness for a wood and steel example than for a polymer example. Whether it’s because it’s been in the family or your collection for a long time, because it’s beautiful and “they don’t make ‘em like this anymore,” because it’s in excellent condition and you know it would be very time consuming and expensive to find another of that model in same-or-better condition…. I think all these considerations can get wrapped in the mantle of “sentimental” when it comes to selling guns. In other words, reasons that are just a little beyond pure considerations of function, utility, and bang for the buck.

    And I’ve heard many, many guys say they’d never, ever sell a particular gun. I have never heard this in relation to a polymer handgun.
     
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  7. Remington1911

    Remington1911 Member

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    I don't know, I don't own a plastic gun other then the one that somehow survived my child hood that came out of a Marx toys detective set. Thing looks so real....you know like how "real" plastic guns look.
     
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  8. chicharrones

    chicharrones needs more ammo

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    For me, sentiment does not come into play.

    But I sure do appreciate the construction effort that went into a metal framed gun. Probably the reason I’m so drawn to revolvers. The metal kind anyway.

    Not to say that I don’t have poly framed guns, because I do. I just see my poly framed guns as the proverbial “tools”.

    Metal guns can be tools as well, but most of my metal framed guns weren’t bought to be tools. Most of my metal framed guns were bought and are fired for my personal enjoyment, not defense.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2022
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  9. mcb

    mcb Member

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    If a gun has sentimental value to me its because of what I have done with that firearm and with whom I have done those things and has very little to do with what the firearms is made from.
     
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  10. Choctaw

    Choctaw Member

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    Couldn't agree more.
     
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  11. KarateHottie93

    KarateHottie93 Member

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    Well...that concept does make a lot of sense. I don't think I've ever seen a polymer gun with a living soul.
     
  12. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    Metal tends to elicit more feelings of an heirloom type item.

    That is basically it though
     
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  13. Remington1911

    Remington1911 Member

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    And plastic....all things plastic elicit feelings of disposable, cheap, zero craftsmanship.

    I doubt anyone has looked at an old hand engraved revolver and not thought at the very least, that looks nice, someone put in a great deal of work on that one, that scene is well done. Show that same person a glock where someone has taken a hot iron to melt groves in the plastic and that same person will go, he melted it, are they really that cheap.....well no they are not that cheap to buy, but make, a bag of plastic BB's can be melted down to form a Barbie doll or glock, the plastic and molds are no different, and require just as much talent to make.

    That is why I don't "like" plastic guns, none of that has thing one to do with how they work.....it has everything to do with how I "feel" when using them.
     
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  14. Buzznrose

    Buzznrose Member

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    We have paper plates, every day plates, and “company plates”. All serve a purpose at our home.

    I have my “heirloom tools” that I’ll pass on and I have “travel/truck” tools that I use but if stolen I can live with it.

    I see guns in a similar way. Wood and metal guns are heirloom and if I like them, become safe queens and future hand downs.

    Polymer guns are SD/HD guns.

    YMMV
     
  15. Coyote3855
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    Coyote3855 Contributing Member

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    No sentiment involved. I choose steel or plastic guns based on their utility and my intended use. I'm sentimental about guns that belonged to my dad and uncle or that I received as a kid - some 70 years ago.
     
  16. TarDevil

    TarDevil Member

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    I've said this many times about my SR9c..
     
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  17. film495

    film495 Member

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    blued steel on anything that is a model that's been around for 100 years or so, new or old, original or repro, they all sing a special song...
     
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  18. doubleh

    doubleh Member

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    Sentiment only comes into play for when it is one that was passed on to me by a relative or friend. I have 103 year old Winchester 94 saddle ring carbine that was given to me by a good friend. I keep it simply for that reason. If it wasn't a reminder of our long friendship I would have absolutely no interest in it. I also have a Hi-Point C-9 that was gift from a grandson. I keep it for the same reason as the 94.
     
  19. Frulk

    Frulk Member

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    Last 3 or 4 handguns I let go were semi auto and poly. Very last one was a P22 that went to a friends wife.

    That I know of I’ve never sent a revolver down the road. I once gifted a SW 329PD to one of my best friends son. I don’t consider that letting it go. It’s still in the circle of trust. And I have a brand new, unshot one in the safe I replaced it with.

    Last rifle I think was a SIG 522 to the godson. It was tactical poly. I call it ‘The Hammer of the LBJ’s’ (Little Brown Jobbers). He uses it to thin the gophers on his aunts sheep leases in Wyoming. I made sure he had extra Black Dog Machine mags and 50 round drums to go with it. He is after all my godson.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2022
  20. Heir Kommt Die Sonne

    Heir Kommt Die Sonne Member

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    I believe its ingrained in us, the type of us that are more sentimental type, to prefer metal and wood. For years of human history, metal has been a very valuable resource to make tools and artifacts with. Anything thats metal, shiny, we view as precious because its hard to come by in nature. It represents skill to metal smith. So I believe we've just been evolved (if you want to use that term) to have a preference for metal and wood, those being the two craftsman resources that have existed longer than ever.
    Although polymer is a sign of a advanced industrial civilization, we haven't caught instinct to value it yet as polymer is so much more disposable than say wooden, glass or metal tools.
    Also I believe wood reminds us more of our natural roots than polymer does. Feeling in our hands the wood, same wood as the trees there are around us.
     
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  21. Night Rider

    Night Rider Member

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    No.
     
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  22. Otto

    Otto Member

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    Guns are like wives, if they look decent and perform well....I'll keep 'em.
     
  23. NIGHTLORD40K

    NIGHTLORD40K Member

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    Huh....if I ever buy a plastic gun, Ill let you know.;)
     
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  24. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    Not really all that sentimental about guns that I have now but I can get a little misty eyed about some of those that I let go down the road like: (all of the Ruger Security Sixes, the two Colt Trooper Mk.Vs, and just about every S&W revolver I ever had; especially the Model 57 and the Model 58 that I sold).
     
  25. shafter

    shafter Member

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    It's the metal of the man who owned it before that I'm sentimental about.
     
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