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Gouging has already started....

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Rapidrob, Sep 14, 2004.

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  1. Rapidrob

    Rapidrob Member

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    I called/e-mailed many persons and companies the sell high cap magazines. I asked about avaibility and pricing on certain mags. And low and behold price gouging has all ready started. I found one fellow selling a Steyr M9 high cap for $150.00 and Glock mags for all most $ 200.00. Making a buck is American, but price gouging is just plain greed. I'm going to compile all the responces to my questions and post then as "buy from", "Don't buy from"
    I'll keep you posted.
    Rapidrob.
     
  2. Kenneth Lew

    Kenneth Lew Member

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    This is the United States of American! You are free to put any price on whatever the hell you want! You are also free to walk away. Unless you were engaged in a transaction with the person and got screwed, don't complain.

    Kenneth Lew
     
  3. rick_reno

    rick_reno member

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    I haven't seen that - I got an email from SigArms notifying me that they are now selling regular capacity magazines for the P226, P228 and P229 - prices appeared to be reasonable at about $50 each. You can purchase them here

    Note: I have no affiliation with SigArms other than I'm on their mailing list.
     
  4. Redlg155

    Redlg155 Member

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    True...It is a free market and anyone is able to pick or choose at his own discretion. Still..it doesn't take the bad taste out of your mouth when you see people trying to take advantage of a situation.

    However, I don't see the logic of asking inflated prices for pre ban items since they no longer hold any new significance, other than being 10 years old.

    What does please me are the numbers of prior pre ban owners willing to sell their recievers to states where their state laws never sunset, and doing so at a very reasonable cost.

    Good Shooting
    Red
     
  5. Skofnung

    Skofnung Member

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    The gougers will not sell many. I have seen Glock mags going for ~$20 online so far, and as time marches on, the prices will likley get a little lower. Ar mags have already dropped to $10.50 or thereabouts for LEO trade-ins over on ARF.com.

    Free markets work. Supply will be forthcoming, and the gougers will have to lower the price or keep their wares. That, and folks remember those who act like sphincters. They will get theirs.
     
  6. bushjumper

    bushjumper Member

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    Keep in mind that prices are going to fluctuate for a while until things settle down. Theres a BIG influx of demand right now.

    Before the ban, Hi Cap factory mags NEVER sold for as cheap as they are going for now. A mag from glock would run you around 40 bucks. Now people call it gouging if they go for more than 20.

    I just don't see us ever getting the LEO prices on this stuff.
     
  7. Daniel T

    Daniel T Member

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    I got an e-mail from CDNN today...

    So, let people gouge all they want, they won't sell anything when companies like CDNN are selling mags for these prices.
     
  8. TaxPhd

    TaxPhd Member

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    "Gouging" doesn't exist. It is a concept invented by liberals who don't like how a market economy works.

    Goods will trade at an agreed upon price by buyer and seller. Unless the seller holds a gun to your head and takes your money by force, the buyer has agreed to the price.

    If the price is too high, don't buy. But to buy and then complain that the price is to high and that you were "gouged" is ridiculous.




    Scott
     
  9. Fred Fuller

    Fred Fuller Moderator Emeritus

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  10. No4Mk1

    No4Mk1 Member

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    Quite right. However, what most people call gouging is when market prices are inflated by an artificial limit in supply, usually caused my government meddling in the market. (i.e. 1994 ban....) When the free market is allowed to operate unencumbered, supply shortages rarely exist for long.

    Now, I'll just don my asbestos and wait for some anarchist or socialist to come along and flame me....:p
     
  11. Texian Pistolero

    Texian Pistolero member

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    The real gouging took place under the ban.

    Just wait and let the market adjust.

    Why not wait and buy in October?

    If Bush wins, wait and buy in January.


    You don't want to get in a squeeze with a Kerry victory.

    But even then, Congress gotta act, and that takes some time.
     
  12. jdkelly

    jdkelly Member

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    Yeah RapidRob,

    What do you think, you have 1st Amendment rights?:)


    Respectfully,

    jdkelly
     
  13. HankB

    HankB Member

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    Makes me want to hope he actually paid $100 for the Steyrs and $125 for his Glock mags . . . . :evil:
     
  14. Okiecruffler

    Okiecruffler Member

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    There is such a thing as gouging

    It happened a short time ago in Florida where the fellow was charging 10 bucks for a couple of C cell battteries. It happened to me after 911 when my trusk was on empty, I had to get to work and was forced to wait in line to pay 2.99 a gallon for gas.

    These high prices for mags are just some shmucks trying to make a bigger profit while demand is high. Problem is, there are too many honest companies out there who were waiting for this thing with truck loads of mags.
     
  15. TaxPhd

    TaxPhd Member

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    Don't want to pay the $10 for batteries? Then don't. But again, there is no such thing as gouging. It is simple supply and demand. The laws of economics don't care if there has been a hurricane, or anything else. Supply and demand create an equilibrium price. Pay it or not, but you aren't getting gouged.

    The people getting "gouged" in Florida hurricanes are those that didn't buy batteries when the market determined equilibrium price was $2, rather than $10. But sorry, a persons lack of preparation doesn't equal "gouging."




    Scott
     
  16. Daniel T

    Daniel T Member

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    Easy for you to say from Colorado. Maybe someone needs to buy those now $10 batteries because the house they used to have the $2 batteries in doesn't exist any more. Or, for that matter, the house they used to have 100 gallons of potable water stored in doesn't exist any more.

    What do you do then? Live through the aftermath of a hurricane, deal with price gouging, then tell me there's no such thing.
     
  17. TaxPhd

    TaxPhd Member

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    If the market determines that the price for batteries is $2, no gouging and all is good. But if the same market determines that the price for batteries is now $10, then it is gouging and all is bad.

    ***??

    The market has determined the price in both situations. But if the price is higher than what it was previously, then it is gouging. Some of you really ought to study economics.



    Scott
     
  18. Daniel T

    Daniel T Member

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    Trying reading my post again and addressing the context.
     
  19. TaxPhd

    TaxPhd Member

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    Supply and demand doesn't care about context. It doesn't care about the circumstances that created it. It is what it is.

    Is the context of your post trying to say that if someone goes through an unfortunate event, the laws of supply and demand should be temporarily suspended?

    I am really not trying to be obtuse here, but I just don't get it.




    Scott
     
  20. 2nd Amendment

    2nd Amendment member

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    The situation matters not. If I have batteries and I want $10 for them and you need batteries and have $10...that's a deal. What they sold for before, or after, is immaterial. Now personally I thought the price hikes on gas after 9/11 were offensive from a moral standpoint, and think the same about the battery thing, but that's how the market works. I much prefer it to how government would have it working.
     
  21. TaxPhd

    TaxPhd Member

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    2nd Amendment,

    Agreed. It may be morally repugnant, but then market prices are not a moral issue.




    Scott
     
  22. TaxPhd

    TaxPhd Member

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    Your comment on how govmnt. would have things working is interesting.

    What happens when govmnt. sets a price ceiling, such as on generators in Florida following a hurricane? That's right, shortages. At the prices mandated by govmnt., more people are willing to buy than the market is willing to supply at the artificial price. Same thing with rent controlled apartments in New York.

    It may be an unpleasant situation, and you may have to pay more than what you think you should have to pay, but I'll stand by my argument - there is no such thing as price gouging.




    Scott
     
  23. Diamondback

    Diamondback Member

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    While it's certainly true prices are influnced by what the market will bear aka " the law of supply and demand"........comsumer satisfaction can greatly determine future price structures. During times of emergency shortage, unforseen circumstances, natural disaster ect. merchants that inflate prices short term to reap quick profit usually pay dearly over the long haul and often create ill will and rally the wrath of their consumer base. Once the temporary influences that "allowed" for an inflated price structure subside and supply rises and cost/demand drop, then level, the consumer is no longer held captive by TaxPhd's market forces. Consumers are free to trade and spend their dollar with whoever they wish. The buying public can "repay the favor" so to speak to a merchant that inflates prices during emergencies and invokes the mighty "law of supply and demand" during an individual's unforseen circumctances by : not trading with said merchant in the future and/or organizing boycots. That's why it's important to "tell your story" to others and name said merchant. Okiecruffler, who was the merchant who treated you such in your time of need ?

    Those that "hide" behind the "law of supply and demand" to increase short term profit at the expense of anothers wellbeing ( and I an NOT talking about magazines here.....but rather batteries, gas, food , water ect. ) strike me as those that might kick a rock off a cliff endangering folks below defending such behavior with the "law of gravity" !

    If it walks like a duck......it's probably a shmuck trying to gouge you ! Fight back.....name names and tell your story. Cooperate......buying coopreratively influnces the marketplace !

    -my insignificant .02...regards.
     
  24. Jon Coppenbarger

    Jon Coppenbarger Member

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    I have a very close friend who is one of the largest magazine dealers in the west and made alot of money during the ban , even on me sometimes .
    Now wow is he crying the blues and telling me Iam selling everything too low on some deals I have passes on to folks lately.
    He got mad when I told him that my beta-c mag price for the ar15 is only $230 for locals plus tax or I just add $11 for shipping in the lower 48.
    And when I bought 350 new leo ar15 mags and sold them all for $11 dollars each and the last batch for $12 each he flipped and acussed me of flooding the market. He still has his mags for $24.99 for new ones and most likely will not sell them for a long time.

    Then Iam sitting on 20,000 rounds of 30-06 still in the clips and bandoleers in the cans in the original crates from lake city and plan on selling them for $17 a bandoleer he said that is way to low but you know what there is always something to sell and Iam not one of those who plan on keeping anything around forever.

    Our phones have been ringing off the hook since monday on folks wanting to buy rifles and parts from us as we are 1 of only 3 rock river stocking dealers in the state.
    And you know what my reputation means more to me than gouging future or existing customers. So I get them the fair prices and they or some of them come back to shop again.
    Iam always leary of folks who say Iam the best or my prices are the best and the one's who buy from them without checking well thats their loss.
    So that is why alot of us are telling anyone who ask's where to go and buy something during this time as we are all a comunity and should help each other.


    jon
     
  25. TaxPhd

    TaxPhd Member

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    Diamondback,

    You make a good point. And if you will review my posts, you'll notice that I didn't say that merchants should do it (raise prices), or that doing it was the best way to maximize long run profits.

    But the market is wonderful thing. If one merchant is trying to sell batteries at the market established price of $10, and all the other merchants around are selling batteries at the "Good Neighbor, I don't care about supply and demand" price of $2, then guess what? The $10 seller isn't going to have sales, and the price will move towards a new market equilibrium.

    And, surprise surprise, still no gouging.

    Perhaps all of you that believe in the existence of gouging ought to tell us when you think the laws of economics should be repealed, and how you would accomplish this, without any of the unintended consequences that come as a result of artificial price floors and ceilings?



    Scott
     
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