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3-D Printed Gun Only Lasts 6 Shots

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Tech Ninja, Dec 3, 2012.

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  1. Trent

    Trent Resident Wiseguy

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    Yeah, which is what has all the anti's panties in a twist.

    If you build your own lower you skip the 4473 / background check.

    The rest of your stuff can be ordered shipped right to your door.

    They're worried about felons building "untraceable" guns. Which, granted, is possible, with or without 3D printing. However, this problem cannot go away, ever, for reasons mentioned above (AK "shovel", homemade guns, etc.)

    It is a fact of human nature that mankind will build weapons. Period.

    It's always been that way, and it's always GOING to be that way.
     
  2. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    That's easily done.............If you can afford the CAD CNC equipment.

    This is a video of "printing" an engine block (119 hour process, $800K machine):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QsmiIeAkE-o
     
  3. Wes B

    Wes B Member

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    I understand that, but the whole thing is as impressive as someone making their own stock for a bolt action and doing a trigger swap.

    So, again, I will think this is impressive if someone prints a plastic upper that holds together.

    And yes, I get that the lower is the part defined as the gun. However, I have never really understood that part. It's just a trigger assembly, magazine well, grip, and stock.

    Doesn't the bolt carrier group fit into the upper receiver? That's the bit that makes the gun go bang.

    So, requiring the lower to go through an FFL is, in my mind, the equivalent of requiring a Timney or Jewel to go through an FFL and/or a replacement stock for a bolt action to go through an FFL.

    Anyways, I still thing this is just drama for the sake of having drama. It was the stock that broke, same thing would have happened if they printed a plastic stock for bolt action rifle. Ok, maybe not a .22 but for dang sure if they did it for a 45/70.
     
  4. W L Johnson

    W L Johnson Member

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    And the Wright Flyer 1 only flew for 12sec and 120ft on it's first flight. Did they give up because it didn't cross the Atlantic?

    Got to start somewhere.
     
  5. Trent

    Trent Resident Wiseguy

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    I still say they're barking up the wrong tree with the AR-15.

    The original system was designed around aluminum. Building the same exact design to the same dimensional specifications out of plastic will have predictable results. Change the specifications and you have a new design; "not quite" an AR-15, isn't.

    Now, build something up around something which was originally designed around polymer, and you'll have something.

    There are quite a few firearms build around polymer. FS2000, PS90, Steyr Aug, etc.

    Glocks and other polymer framed pistols would be an interesting experiment but they have substantial metal reinforcement at key parts of the frame (to keep the slide from violently flying off towards your nose...). To do those properly you need a pretty sophisticated mold to hold precisely crafted steel reinforcements at precise points (introducing intersting flow issues in the mold, I'm sure). On top of that.. you some REALLY high strength polymer, not cheap plastic. :)

    So the relevant question is, what's the strongest polymer material that you can buy, and print with?

    And is there an existing design which will work at those strengths? If not, what reinforcements or alterations are necessary on the stress points to MAKE the design work?
     
  6. bigfatdave

    bigfatdave Member

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    Probably

    makes sense to me

    So why not start the design from scratch, focusing on making it work with available plastic and common washers/pins anyone could get from the hardware store?
    I'll note that washers or other metallic reinforcement could be easily added to a laminated design.
     
  7. mljdeckard

    mljdeckard Member

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    .....it's a start. :)
     
  8. we are not amused

    we are not amused Member

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    Personally, since I believe every one should control a weapon, I find the concept of "printing" a gun to be fascinating and exciting advance!

    A couple of people have brought up the WWII "Liberator" as an example, and I agree! Anything that make Totalitarians nervous makes me happy.

    The concept of 3-D printing is very new, and was considered science fiction just a few years ago. While most 3D printers only work with plastic, some are now capable of working with metal as previously noted. Some are even affordable for the home hobbyist.

    While no 3D printer is currently capable of completely making a gun from scratch, the technology is still in it's infancy, and advancing fast.

    As far as "illegal" guns being made, I would worry far more about the home hobbyist with a metal lathe and metal shaper than some one with a plastic 3D printer.

    As far as the hysteria over "plastic guns" being x-ray invisible? I merely point out that has been a staple of the anti-gun whackos for a long time.
     
  9. gym

    gym member

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    The key to it in my opinion is to find a better sustance to use in the printer. Someone will come up with a more durable material that can be used to copy the parts with.
    Once that happens then you may have a real gun.
    But still these could get through metal detectors and be usable, even if only for a short time. A group of 3 or 4 men would have 15 or 20 ronds to fire, in a secured location, if they could get the ammo in. perhaps a courthouse, or airport?
    I am sure whatever they are using can be improved upon.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2012
  10. Prince Yamato

    Prince Yamato Member

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    That's pretty darn impressive. The application potential for this is immense. Personally, I could see this being more feasible for handguns. Imagine having the ability to print handgun parts in your home. XYZ part needs replacing? Load the file and print it. Voila! Replacement part.

    Once the printing material is strengthened, I could see a future application whereby manufacturers would sell you a part file online for a couple of dollars, you download it, and print it once. Kind of like how you can purchase sheet music online.
     
  11. barnbwt

    barnbwt Member

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    I wonder how long it will be before the BATFE shuts down this Tech Shop place:

    http://www.techshop.ws/

    A publicly available shop with everything you need to make anything. Sounds too laissez faire for our Govt to trust us with it (these days).

    "What gunpowder did for war the printing press has done for the mind."
    --Wendell Phillips

    The internet has greatly democratized the First Amendment; I believe RP has the opportunity to do the same for the Second. Cost of a ready-to-go Makerbot setup is down to <2000$. Unassembled/used kits go for ~500$ on Ebay

    TCB
     
  12. Trent

    Trent Resident Wiseguy

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    Interesting, I didn't know a cottage industry like that even existed.

    A lot of the equipment needed to mass produce anything of substance and durability is well outside of the means of a normal individual (heat treating, laser cut steel tables, etc.) The 3d water-cutter CNC mill that my uncle uses at the Coast Guard base in N.C. is a good example. The thing can fabricate all SORTS of neat stuff (like parts for his aging Dodge truck engine :) ), but the cost of it is well beyond the means of mere mortals.
     
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